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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - May 11, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Refinery Tank Blazes After Mystery Blast L B. WIFE SHOT, MATE AT BAY A BIG SMOKE. CLOUD rises oil tank at the .Golden Eagle Refin- ing Co. in Carson today.'Fire started Sunday after an 4 Begin Parley After By JOHN HIGHTOWER GENEVA WV-The Big Four foreign ministers opened their conference on Cold War prob- lems tonight, hours late, after running aground for a time on the question of how! the East German government' should participate. U.S., Secretary ,of. State British Foreign 'Secretary 'S e 1 wy n Lloyd, French Foreign Minis- ter Maurice' Couve de Mur- ville and Soviet Foreign Min- ister Andrei-A. Grornyk6 filed into a conference room.in the Palace of contained a round table for the Big 'Four' and" separate tables for the East and West German representatives. In a day of private consul tations, the 'Western powers headed off Grbmyko's attempt to get full.participation rights for Communist East Germany. Until late afternoon it seemed likely the formal opening would have to be put ofi until Tuesday. THEN AN informal session of'the four ministers finally came up with an agreement giving the East and West Ger- mans limited speaking rights in the conference but no seats at the main table. They also decided on the confer ence room furniture (Continued Page A-6, Col.. 1) An' 'fuel oil tank demolished in a spectac- ular explosion_at the Golden Eagle Refining Co. in Carson Sunday night was not ex: pected to burri' out until late today. Eight fire companies which fought the blaze contained it to the. one tank, keeping it from spreading to eight other tanks on the property at 21000 S. Figueroa St. To keep the flames from reaching one tank only 350 feet away con- taining high octane gasoline, firemen'sprayed "a curtain ol water" around the blazing uel oil. Damage was estimated al early. 9 Die, 1 Hurt in Bomber s Crash-Fire WHIDBEY ISLAND NAVAL nk when the explosion. oc- shooting flames eet .into; the air. Albert R 'refinery superintend nt; said because of this no ne was injured. He said he ad no'idea what could have et off the blast. Police roped off the'streets urrounding the refinery anc sidents of a housing trac cross the street from the re nery were alerted that they might have to be evacuate eing filled, with the oil abou ive feet deep, when the ex ilosion occurred, Jones saic ,Asst. Chief G. E. Brunton who commanded the 50 fire men at the scene, said th ank's sides collapsed inwarc .f fee lively damming the blaz ng oil and preventing it from preading. AIR Nine.crewmen were 'killed am one critically injured toda; when a Navy patrol bombe crashed and burned on take off from this Puget Soum island base. The Navy said seven bodie were recovered from th charred wreckage and tw others were unaccounted for Names of the victims wer withheld, THE TWIN-ENGINED P2V Neptune had just lifted of Ault Field when fire flashes from its right engine, the righ wing 'dipped and the plan crashed, exploded and burhec in thick woods near the run way. The patrol bomber was as signed to the heavy attac training unit, Pacific, sec here on Whktbey Island abou 60 north of Seattle. I carried a crew of; 10. Journalist' l.C. Lee Bla said rescue crews arrived 'a the scene in time to pull on man out alive but critical I burned, NO ONE -was.1 ;near .-the 'rain-Truck Crash Kills 8 in Poland WARSAW, P o land light, persons were killed an 19'seriously injured Sunda when a train crashed into truck at Hajnowka, in north east Poland. 65 Million Jobs in U. S. Sets Record WASHINGTON UP) The lumber of Americans at work ose by over a million in April o a total of 65 million, a rec- ird for the month. Unemploy- ment declined by The mprovement in both employ- ment a'nd unemployment were double what, is seasonally ex- iected in'April, .The employment total is the lighest recorded for any. April tnd compares with peak erri- >loyment of' in July 1957. Secretary of Commerce Lewis Strauss and Secretary of .Labor James :.P. Mitchel said in a joint statement the figures demonstrate a rapidly accelerating: job recovery. Employment rose to ari increase of over 'March. This'. is more jobs than in April last year. UNEMPLOYMENT declined to dipping by 000, from' March. This is a decline of from the recession conditions i.n April of last year.. The. 1957 figures in April were employed and unemployed. In the first four months ol this.year unemployment has dropped by. over one million The Commerce-Labor monthly job report, attributec the April improvements to an unusually large pickup in con- struction and brisk hiring in hard good manufacturing to- gether with the spring expan- sion in agriculture. The. seasonally adjusted Ex-Janitor Bursts Into Office Here Volley of Shots Fired; Hold Up Capture By WARREN WALTERS An enraged ex-janitor burst into a Long Beach office this fired a volley pi shots at his estranged wife and then held police and other employes at bay for -20. mint utes -while' he threatened to blow them up with nitrbglyc- erin; Police surrounded the office of .the 'Nielsen: Pump Works, 3204 Cherry Ave., after learn- ing the- gunman had; barri- caded himself in the office and refused to come Out until his wife 'Mrs, Mary Williams, 47, a stenographer of 4622 Banner Dr., lay wounded while her estranged husband held other employes off with a pistol, a rifle, a 7-inch knife and the aottle of clear liquid, t t IN THE VOLLEY, of shots she was hit three times. Other- bullets pounded into the walls and doors of the small office area in the building. No one else was wounded. Arrested was Dayton Wil- iams, 53, formerly a janitor pump firm. Witnesses in the office said e surrendered only after he jelieved his wife was dying. Tw.o valiant Long Beach po- Finesl Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, MAY 30 PAGES CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 Vol. 84 PK1CE 10 CENTS HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) rELEPHONE HE 5-1I6I More Twisters Rake Midwest lice officers played a key role in capturing OFFICER JOHN SKELTON distracted the estranged hus- band's attention while Motor Officer Don Sternberg movec in the back door. While Williams held'-the pistol in one hand arid the A NEIGHBOR-LOOKS at horae'of Julius was: moved off' its foundation in'Ashwaubenon, Wis., south of Green Bay, by a of many that hit in Midwest and Southwest Sunday. Five'mem- bers of the family, inside at the.time, escaped injury. Alberts' garage disappeared and the car inside was found twisted and battered in behind- the PressWirephote.) Spinning rf d s t p. r'm s rate of unemployment in the labor force dropped to 5.3 per cent in April by comparison with per cent in March and around 6 per cent during the winter months, HITS WHIPPING POST Delaware's Governor Vetoes Lashing Bill DOVER, Del. (ffh-Gov. J. Caleb Boggs today vetoed a bill which would make public lashing mandatory for con- victed robbers and is calling for abolition of the whipping post altogether. He described this form of punishment as "barbaric and inhuman" and said it .was no deterrent to crime. The House, voting 22-3, passed the Senate's version of the bill April 29. The bill provides for 20 to 40 lashes for the first of- fense and no fewer than 30 for.each conviction thereafter. Passage of the bill was prompted by alarm over an in- crease in the crime, especially arnied robbery. Colonial times, DelaWre has had the whipping, post. Men have been punished stake for wife-beat- ing, theft and certain other offenses. But the whipping al- ways was done at the judge's discretion. In seven.years, no one has been whipped by a judge's decree. The governor said that he delayed his action so that the public might express its views. It has done so, he stated, speaking out three to against the bill. rifle in the other, Sternberg drew his service pistol. Der tectives said at this point W'il-i iams surrendered meekly.' He was booked at city jail on a charge of assault with intent to commit murder. Mrs. Williams was taken, to Community Hospital in what attendants described as serious condition with a bul; et lodged near her stomach, a.' wound on the little finger of her right hand and another in her thigh. i AL RENEE, an accountant for the firm, said Mrs. Wil- .iams pleaded with her estranged husband not to shoot when he first burst into the office. He said Williams fired sev- eral shots before leveling the .22-caliber pistol at his wife and' firing. According to Renee, the woman continued her plead ing as she lay on the floor. She moaned: "Please get a doctor." Along with his other arma- ments, Williams a bottle of clear liquid attached to his belt. AFTER WOUNDING.'his wife, he herded the other' em- ployes toward the back of the office and brandished the bot- tle threatening, "If you try to help her, I'll blow you'up.' After the capture, police found the bottle contained nothing but water. Detectives said Williams burst into the office about a. m. -He dropped his guns about 20 minutes later. DETECTIVES SAID the couple had been married for seven years and were sep- arated two months ago. Reportedly, Williams .trav- eled to Oregon after the sep- aration and later returned to Los Angeles where.he got a Illinois'today, killing one per- son at Ami Arbor and causing severe damage. Monticello in central Illinois was hit also. The-; tight twisting winds chewed into the central Great Lakes -region after weekend tornadoes -ripped into si x states in the plains and mid- west killing 6, injuring 21 and causing heavy property damage. The Ann Arbor storm, de Scribed, .by. witnesses as a small tornado, .ripped' part of the roof from Yost -Field- house. At the big. University of-. Michigan Stadium press box windows were blown out. One woman was reported killed by a fallen electric line in the Burns Park area. Two houses were set afire. APPARENTLY, only the Monticello area was hit in Illinois. Striking just before dawn the Illinois twister cracked wall and damaged the rooi of a one-story plant, upset two parked truck trailers shattered a dozen plate glass windows in town and snappec utility .lines. A- number of roofs were (Continued Page A-6, Col. 6) Lindsay Says Check s Innocence a purported embezzlement from unclaimed estates also indicates he-is "innocent of any wrong- Lindsay said.today in an exclusive interview with The Press-Telegram. job. He refused correct address. to give his Weather- Mostly clear tonight and sunny Tuesday with variable high clouds, but night and early wonting low Littk change in temperature. By BOB WHFARLEY :The; vcanceled'check that Sgt. Phil Lindsay'and Philip ;A'! Ad- kins, deputy county public administrator, were arrested .over-the week- end on' suspicion" of corisplr- ng to commit grand Investigators said r Adkins confessed, looting estates ad- ministered by him, and pay- ng the money to fictitious leirs. Adkins, 42, has repu; dialed "the confession. Lindsay, 45, of 1750 Redon- do Ave., a veteran of 17 years on the Long Beach police force, was arrested after in- vestigators found a canceled check endorsed in the name of an apartment house-he "1 CASHED the. check as a favor for he: told this newspaper at an inter- view in the office of his at- torney, Sam Lack man. "I col- lect a good deal'of money in apartment rent on the first oi (Continued Page A-6, Col. 4) ilthPuts Parents of 6 in Jail LOS ANGELES (Jfi A urriiture.facto'ry manager who earns a month and his wife.are. under arrest m charges that the filthy ondition of their Wilshire district home endangered the health and safety of their six home at. 223 N. Lucerne Blvd Sunday-night on a report tha w a s assaulting a PHIL LINDSAY 45-year-old police r sergeant dropped from, the force Saturday, poses today with his attorney, at an interview at Lackman's Photo) children. Police were called to the man woman. OFFICERS SAID the home was.neat and trim on the out side but chaotic inside. The; said the rooms were littere lack Belgian flag flew, .side iy side with the U. S. Flag at lozens of locations. Picked troops stood at atr: ention flying the flags of the '9 American states. A crowd >f some 300 persons, many of hem holding small Belgian lags, also gathered, The King arrived after. I ive-hour stopover at Langley Air Force Base, Va. There he ested, changed his: clothes and made a tour of inspection of the base. WHERE TO FIND IT Escaped German prisoner: of war surrenders to FBI; after 14 years. Story Page A-4.. Beach B-L Hal A-t. O4 to i. B4, 7. B-8. Death B-2. A-8. B-3. Shipping A-S. C-l, 2, t, 4. A-10. TMes, TV, C-10. B-4, Your A-J.   

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