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Press Telegram: Saturday, May 9, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - May 9, 1959, Long Beach, California                             2 GUARDS CHAT NEARBY Auction Burglars I Grab Stamp Collection :DUBLIN stole, worth of rare stamps Friday night from an auction house where two-guards sat chatting in a nearby room. But the thieves passed up the Maurice Bnrrus collection stored near the stolen stamps in Shanahan's auction house. Paul Singer, manager of Shanahan's, said the robbery represented "probably the greatest theft of its kind in history." A suitcase containing about 5 per cent.of the stolen stamps was found this morning on a Dublin dock. PROVES MY POINT that the idiots-who stole these stamps were Singer- said., "They didn't know, what'they got. It will.take 30 years for any of the of stamps that were .taken-to be sold." Singer said that the two guards who were in "a near- by room" to protect the for sale at auction today, told him they didn't hear a sound. The thieves broke through a ground floor window and broke into cabinets on the ground and second floors. The stamps, from what Singer called the "Austrian- Italy were bought through an agent who refused to disclose the name of the owner. RUSS FIRST AT GENEVA, CALL ON ALLIES TO LEAVE BERLIN Excursion Disaster Toll May Reach 150 CAIRO, Egypt and navy frogmen to- 'da'y recovered an additional 40 bodies from the sunken LB. County Aid Nabbed as Embezzler Estates Guardian Charged With Theft Conspiracy Phillip A. Adkins, deputy public'administrator of Los Angeles County, was arrested at his.Long Beach home late Friday on charges of conspir- acy to .commit grand theft from Estates entrusted to the county's care. He was booked into County HOME 4 Talks The Southland't Finett Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, MAY 9, 1959 20 PAGES Vol. LXXII-No. 83 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) hiilk of the riverboat Dandara; which capsized Friday a holiday picnic crowd of about 300 persons ward. These were in addition to Germany E; Frees Yank Civilian Pilot HELMSTEDT, Germany 4-Co_mmunist East. Germany today Emory A Vaughan, an American civil ian "pilot who had been de taiiied since March 27. The 32-year-old pilot from Portsmouth, Va., arrested by the Communists when his sports- plane; strayed across the. Iron Curtain, 'was freed at .this West. German frontiei post! in the custody of thi American .Red Cross. Rqbert'.StSrey Eu ropeans operations directo of. the AWrican Red Cross crossed the-, .border to'.'mee Vaughan -and guide, him injtc Helmstedt.- .Wilson earlier ar Vaughan's releas in negotiations. with the Ea's German Red Cross. .AS. HE CROSSED the bor der to Western Germany Vaughan said to newsmen: have nothing to say." said; "Vaughan wa well and is in goo health." The American received ma and packages through the Re Cross he was held i the East, Wilson said, a'ddin tha.t the East German Re  sertions that the most urgent problems for the conference were a peace treaty with Ger- many and liquidation of the Allied occupation in Berlin. "IT IS FOR a positive solur tion of these important ques- tions that the Soviet tion has arrived said. "Our intentions., are serious. We shall make, every effort for this conference to be crowned with success. "The Soviet government is confident that at present (Continued Page A-3, CoL 6> A COT, A CHAIR and a campfire are shared by a group of Chavez Ravine evictees who spent the night near the Homes from which they were evicted Friday to make room for the Los Angeles Dodgers' new ball park. Although city officials said arrangements had bee'n made for them elsewhere, they refused to leave. FESTIVAL HAS ITS SCANDAL Starlet Sheds Swim Suit, Poses in Nude CANNES, France French movie starlet attending the Cannes Film Festival.obligingly posed in the nude for 200 photographers .today. It was the festival's first PHILLIP A. ADKINS Grand Theft Suspect Ike Golfs, Grumbles About His 'Old Bones' GETTYSBURG, Pa. MB Grumbling a bit about his "stiff old as he made practice swings, President Eis- enhower set out early this major scandal .and contrary to the vow of festival organ- izers that this year the annual film contest was going to be dignified. The posing took place on the island of Lerins, about a mile out in the Mediterranean, where stars attending the fes- tival had gone for a picnic. ing a- two-piece swimming suit. Then the photographers saw another sight through their view-finders Nathalie minus her brassiere. "I lost she explained. Somehow, too, she lost the bottom half. There was a vir- tual explosion of flash bulbs and the festival had its scan- LOS ANGELES men, women and children uddled around a campfire early today in protest against eviction from the Chavez Ra- vine site of trie hew Los An- eles Dodgers baseball sta- dium. They awaited the arrival of city'bulldozers to raze more lomes. Fifteen THE Nathalie Nattier, started by posing on [morning on a round of rocks. She was wear- Ejhioke Recorded in S. F. Boy Area SAN FRANCISCO An earthquake was San Francisco today; but ap >arently caused no damage The seismograph at. the Jniversity of California in Berkeley recorded the quake at a.m. Dr. Don Tocher, seismolo >ist, said the epicenter was 18 miles southwest of Berke eX-. 66 PARTIES FOR 75TH BIRTHDAY MISSING DOG 'WORTH A MILLION' Tina-Harden 5, and twin sister, Nancy, pose next to poster tacked up near their New York home in attempt to find missing pet dachshund. The girls say the dog, Sepplij is worth a million dollars to them, but they could scrape up only as reward. for. its return', Poster carries photo and full description of the 10-year-old pet, missing since April 6, (AP Wirephoto) Wi felt in residents were evicted from three condemned ibmes amid screaming, cry- ng and cursing -Friday. Manuel Arechiga, 71, jitched a makeshift tent for lis wife, Abrana, 63, their two daughters and five grand- children. JOINED BY FRIENDS and relatives, they sang songs around the campfire through the night. The Arechigas had been evicted Friday and their home for 36 years bulldozed to rub ble. City Councilman Ed Royba! visited the campsite during the night. "This is not morally right and is very he said 'I will bring it up in City Council on Monday in an ef- fort to determine why this decision to move these people (Continued on Pg. A-3, Col. 8 'K1 Gives Germans H-Threaf LONDON (M Moscow Radio said today that Soviet remier Khrushchev told vis- iting West German editors eight hydrogen bombs would be enough to put West Ger- many out of action. The broadcast quoted Khrushchev as saying "ob viously not more" would be needed to take care of the rest of Western Europe. Moscow reported the talks between the Soviet premier and the German delegation took place Tuesday. IN THE SAME talk, Khru- shchev was quoted Friday as telling the editors that the So- viet Union would have "losses arid great ones" in event of war, but "the Western powers Adenauer Visit by Herter BONN, Germany S.; Secretary of .State Christian Herter flew-off to .Geneva to- day after achieving "a full larmony of views" with Chancellor Kohrad Adenauer. U. S. Ambassador David K. E. Bruce, who sat in on all the talks, said .the two saw. eye-to-eye on international is- sues and were "in real agree; ment" on'proposals tad- tics to be employed, by the West at the foreign ministers conference opening Monday. i ON ARRIVAL, Herter said the West was in full agree- ment on proposals to carry to Geneva. Herter said he looked for: ward "to having same close and friendly relationship with Chancellor Adenauer which Secretary Dulles en- joyed." HERTER STOPPED here briefly before flying on to Geneva. "Our two countries, along with the United Kingdom and France, are in full-agreement on an important and; far- reaching Western position which is designed to make a lasting contribution to peace in Herter told the wou'ld be literally wiped off gathering at the'airport the face of the earth." He said NATO's bomber force was out of date and the United States also was lag ging' behind the Soviet Union in rocket technology! WEATHER Sunny with high clouds today. Slightly wanner Sunday. Truman Feted From Coast to Coast NEW YORK na- tion saluted Harry S. Truman on his 75th birthday 'Friday night. It was usually voluble Truman ad- mitted he was at a loss for words. "I don't know what there is to he said. "No coast-to-coast man in my recollection has Tex) told him "Harry, party where the fast-stepping had a treat such as you have ittlpr nffln from Missouri eiven me tonight. I can't talk ittle nfan from Missouri leard himself described as a man who grew to greatness. The tributes came from Democrats and Republicans, iberals and'conservatives, the great, the not-great, friends, was song and laughter, and Truman himself almost lost his glasses laughing at off- beat comedian Mort Sahl. When it was all over, the of them were linked by closed-circuit television. Here in New York, House Speaker Sam Rayburn given me tonight, politics under circumstances like this I will always re- member." THEN HE SMILED as he admitted that he might "take family and old rivals. There a hand in 1960 it's in my blood, I can't help it." He didn't elaborate. His birthday party was marked by 66 parties in cities across the country. Sixteen man that President Roosevelt' was dead. Of Truman 4w CD- his- tory-'is going to be kind to you. They are going to- for- get the few times that you have not taken dead aim, but have shot from the hip.'They are going to remember you for the great things you have done." ONE OF THE MOST dra matic moments came when Eleanor. Roosevelt described the April'day in 1945 when she tokJ Vice President Tru- "The character of my I was proved on that terrikia day., He was frightened ;W 'should have been. For man -had -ever been ptaead wo abruptly in such a seat sponsibility. "And yet there w: in him the slightest that he would try to evade what fate had thrust upon WM. I knew, then he WM nun. Later t thrilled teuton him grow to (ContUuad Paji 5)   

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