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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: May 6, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - May 6, 1959, Long Beach, California                             SCENE THAT TUGS AT HEARTSTRINGS Churchill Makes Hospital Call on Marshall and Dulles 2 ABDUCT MANAGER, LOOT ONTARIO BANK PRESIDENT EISENHOWER and his White House guest, Sir'Winston Churchill of Great Britain, chat with John Foster Dulles during a visit at Walter Reed I .Hospital where Dulles is under treatment for Wirephoto.) ARRAIGNMENT TODAY Mother, Lover Tell Murder of 2 Boys .SAN DIEGO mother and her unemployed boy friend calmly told officers Tuesday how they planned and carried out the murder of her two young ons. The couple, who had been San Diego only two weeks ere quoted by sheriff's dep- ies as saying they killed the oys last Saturday "because ley were bad" and left their odies in the mountains east here. Kenneth Archie Merriam i, an unemployed painter Id officers and reporters hi rangled the boys at the sug estion of their mother, Mrs anda Brogdon, 3j3. "She talked me into Merriam said. "It's a shame.: He had been asked to ex ain why he strangled Davi Vayne Brogdon, 3, arid Vir il Brogdon Jr., 5. VIRGIL BROGDON JR.  ut the bodies in the back heir car, and drove to th home of Merriam's siste vlrs. Margaret Schmitter, uburban Spring Valley. When Mrs. Schmitte earned what had happene he telephoned the sherifl office, saying: "There are tv dead kids in the car an tiey're going to get me." Mrs. Schmitter said lat she served Merriam and Mr (Continued Page A-5, Col. The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 1959 Vol. 80 _________.____.__ CLASSIFIED HE 2-5958 PRICE 10 CENTS 52 PAGES TELEPHONE HE HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) WASHINGTON It was visit that tugged at the eartstrings timeworn Sir inston Churchill paying a ill on iends. two gravely ill old CHURCHILL now is 84 put it at lis news conference Tuesday showing the wear and ear of advancing age, al- hough still mentally alert. So t was something of a physical effort for him to go to the lospital frojn.the White -louse. He arid the President first spent about two minutes with Marshall, who recog- nized them but could say ittle. Mrs. Marshall told the visitors, however, that her lusband was delighted they lad come. Newsmen were not permit- ted to accompany Churchill and Eisenhower. But White House Press.Secretary James C. Hagerty did and he later gave reporters an account of the sessions with Marshall and Dulles. It was Hagerty who plied the.picture of deep emo- picture of the Presi- dent escorting one somewhat enfeebled old friend on the (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) Find Stolen Tot in Store; Girl, 16, Held Baby-Sitter Admits Kidnap; Abandons Baby in Dallas DALLAS bright- eyed kidnaped New Mexico baby was found abandoned and unharmed in a down- town Dallas drug store today. The baby-sitter who abducted him was arrested. The child is the'18-month- old son of Mr. and Mrs, Paul Johnson of Placitas, a moun- tain village 20 miles north- east of Albuquerque. The child and a 16-year-old baby- sitter had been hunted by the FBI and other officers since Monday. The baby-sitter, Betty Smithey, a New Mexico girls' welfare school inmate, was arrested 'a short time 'after the baby was found, and free- ly admitted she fled with the child. FEDERAL i dn a'p'iri'g charges were filed against Miss Smithey in Albuquerque by the FBI Com- missioner Owen J. Mowrey, charging her with unlawfully taking the child from Placitas to Dallas. When Miss Smith- ey will be returned from Dal- las is in the hands of the U. S. marshal, the FBI said. Biting her fingernails nerv- ously, the young abductor told police, "I don't know why I did it. I just took it." The baby, Mitchell John- son, who could be mistaken Warped Loyalty to Pal Blamed in Hewlett Case INQUIRY John Rv Hehdrickson 40, appears Before Commissioner Jpseprj Karesh (left) in San Francisco Tuesday in connection with ment of Long Beach Wirephoto.) A warped sense of. loyalty to a pal apparently led banker George.A. Hewlett into cover- ing bad checks -for manufac- turer John R. Hendrickson, federal officials disclosed to- day. It was an arrangement that cost the bank and its insurers and Hewlett his life. The 40-year-old Hewlett, who less than three weeks ago was promoted to assist- ant vice president of U. S. for a girl because of his long National Bank of San Diego, hair, appeared healthy unharmed. resigned last chologist at school, girl to children. WIFE NAGGED "Poor Fisherman1 Wafts Into River DETROIT Police said Jamie Jones, 40, got so irritated when his wife nagged him as a poor fish- erman Tuesday he de- liberately walked off a De- .troit River dock into the water. He was out, treated at a hospital, and released. The child's mother, who and put a bullet through his heart Friday night when he week the as psy- welfare had look employed after her the found out auditors wsre.wise to his embezzlement scheme. Evidence indicates Hewlett once made the mistake of MRS. JOHNSON, when notified of the finding of her child and the arrest of the girl, expressed compassion for the confused girl. "It's tragic. She's basic- ally Mrs. Johnson told a newsman. The Smithey girl went to the New Mexico school as a runaway from the home of her sister in Chandler. Ariz. She has an aunt living in Dallas. The girl told police she had planned an escape from the Johnson home and that she thought if she took the child (Continued Page A-5, Col. I) four covering an insufficient-funds check for Hendrickson, Asst. U. S. Attorney Donald Con- PANEL TOLD TO DISREGARD RACE stine told a federal hearing in San Francisco. AT THE TIME, Hewlett was cashier of -Long Beach National Bank, which Jasl month was merged with U. S National. That one mistake led to a pyramid of others, Constine said. "It apparently just grew and grew until he found his position Constine said. THESE WERE the other developments as FBI agents continued their check o (Continued Page A-5, Col. 2) Licenses of Suspended SACRAMENTO E ant. drivers are finding ou hat Robert I. McCarthy, tate director of motor vi icles, means what he says When took over the jo e instituted a program i river's-1 i c e n s e suspensio ch he said would affe bout persons a mont The department announce oday that by May 1, just 2 lays after the plan went in ffect, drivers' licensi lad been lifted for traff violations. "Let this be the answer 11 those who wondered if w meant 'business when w ailed this an all-out war o .utomobile M Carthy said. Negro Coed Testifies to Jury on Assault by 4 White Men WHERE TO FIND IT Democrat Harold J. Grady Tuesday routed former Mary land Gov. Theodore McKeldin in Baltimore's mayor election See Page A-2. Fla. A 19-year-old' Negro coed frorri Florida A. M. Univer- sity told a specially summoned Leon County. Grand Jury to day her story of being seized at gunpoint raped by four young white men. The girl v jroughttothe courthouse by sheriff's dcpu ties from University Hospital, where she has been kept under sedation since the at- tack last Saturday morning. She was before the grand jury less than half an hour, She was attended by a1 nurse, the hospital adminis- trator, her mother and broth- er. Her home is in Tallahassee. Sheriff Bill Joyce informed newsmen about her appear- ance before the jury. Several other witnesses preceded her into the grand jury room. Circuit Judge W. May Walker told the 18-member all-male jury it was "to func- tion without regard to race, color or creed according to the law applicable to the case." A gallery packed with Negroes looked on as Walker administered the oath to the jurors. After hearing the brief charge from the judge, the jurors filed into an adjoining room for their secret delib erations. The grand jury is considering other cases in addition to the rape charges and there was no indication how long it would remain in session. Beach B-l. Hal A-25. A-2S. C-5 to 11 A-M, 27. A-22. Death B-2. A-24. B-3. Shipping A-19. C-l, 2, 3, 4. B-4. Tides, TV, C-12. A-25. B-8, 9, 10. Your A-2. Picasso 'Nude1 Sells for LONDON (ffi A nu et to Picket mmy Show Lines to Be Set Up in 3 Cities, Strikers Reveal NEW YORK (M The TV mmy award ceremonies to ght will be picketed by tech- cians engaged in a dispute ith the National Broadcast- Also Captives for 12 Hours Taken for Drive Before Thggs Set in Vault. ONTARIO UP) Two masked gunmen held a bank manager, his wife and his father hostage for 12 hours and then looted the Bank of America of, today. After locking 16 employes in a storeroom, the holdup men escaped, carrying the currency in the bank's money sacks. They forced Manager Frank Colella, 42, to admit them to the bank at 4th and Mountain g'Co., a union official said xlay. The picket lines will be set p. in New York, Hollywood n'd Washington, D. C., all .of hich will be points of origin r the'program. Sen. Mike Mansfield (D- scheduled to appear om the- Mayflower Hotel .in Vashingtori, .has sent word lat he will not cross the icket line, the union official aid. The official, G. Tyler Byrne, Sts. just before 9 a. m. They waited until the' time lock opened the vault COLELLA TOLD police that a man knocked on the door of his home at p. m. Tuesday and announced: "This is Sgt. Murphy.of the police." When he opened-the door, Colella said, a man with a silk stocking over his head and a gun in his hand pushed his way inside. In the house with Colella ifector of network affairs of were his wife, 'Winifred, 42, he National Assn. of Broad- ast Employes and Techni- 66. ans, said the union had noti- eld Mansfield in advance of he intended picketing.- SAID Vice Presi- ent Nixonj also scheduled o appear, likewise had been dyised of picketing plans. The union, has received no an- wer. from him, Byrne said. In New York, seven former ;mmy Award winners, a tech- lical director and six camera- men, are expected, to be .mong'the pickets qutside the Ziegfeld Theater] Byrne said. Some NBC techni- Jans have been off the job ince April 27 in a dispute as o what. extent the union's members should be used in aping TV shows overseas for iroadcast in the United tates. Supervisory, personnel lave been handling the shows. and his father, E; R. Colella, The gunmen told "We're to the bank in the morriipg." 9 3f V .AFTER ABOUT 15 minute's, Colella said; .another masked man entered and asked his jartner: "Everything all right, Cojella said the men ad- dressed each 6ther .as "Joe" at all times. About 11 p.m.'the bandits ordered the Colellas upstairs WHEN THE program rolls .onight (10 o'clock Long Seach most eyes are ixpected to be on Fred As- taire. The ageless Astaire is the favorite of .the Vine St. bet- tors to become Emmy's man of the year. His single pro- gram, which took months of rehearsal time to get that re- laxed look, has nominations in three major categories. Most of the so-called ex- perts figure that Astaire will be called to the podium three the best single program, best special musical or variety program and best single performance by an actor. Railway Strike Hits Paris Area PARIS A 24-h our strike by railway engineers today virtually shut down rail traffic between Paris and its suburbs. .o bed. They stood guard .on .he stairs. "I1-, didn't sleep all Colella related. About 5 a.m., the gunmen >ot the family up and allowed :hem to eat breakfast. THEN THE robbers ordered the Colellas into their car and forced them to drive around until time to go to the bank. "I almost had heart failure when a friend honked at said Colella. Colella said he saw several police cars during the mean- dering drive but was afraid to signal them! Upon arriving at the.bank, Colella admitted the gunmen and told "employes who had arrived for work: "This is a holdup.-Do every- thing they tell you." THE BANDITS herded the employes into a storeroom, locked them in and waited for the time lock to open .the vault. Then they drove off in Colella's car to a motel where they had parked .their, get- away car. Police said, it is a 1955 or 1956 blue Buick. Colella said both men were white and about six feet tali. He said one was about 42, the other about 30. He. added that they were courteous but businesslike all through the night. CRASH TURNS DOZEN LOOSE San Bernardino Freeway Shut 2 Hours as Steers Stampede LOS ANGELES steers ran loose on the busy San Bernardino Freeway after a cattle-truck collision, caus- ing: At'least five accidents, one a three-car affair that sent three men to a hospital. A roundup the likes of IT BEGAN when a truck carrying 20 steers collided before dawn with the rear of a truck carrying sewer pipe. Twelve animals escaped.. Three were killed by motor- ists. More than 40 officers from which seen. The closing of the freeway for two hours. the range has never various nearby communities joined highway patrolmen in a roundup that led them down side streets, through back- yards and business districts. AN ALHAMBRA policeman chased two for more than two miles, but finally lassoed both. Other officers corraled three others behind a home after three-mile chase. Two professional cowboyi from the Union Stockyards were called to help police with the roping and bulldogging.   

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