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Press Telegram: Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 30, 1959, Long Beach, California                             3 CHILDREN TRAPPED Mother Swims for Aid os Car Plunges in Creek MEDICS TAKE CANCER FROM GODFREY LUNG HOME The Swlhland't Finett Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1959 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5851 Vol. 75 70 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1181 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) WALTER, SHARON AND KENNETH BRIDGES (from left) warm up at hospi- 'tal with hot chocolate after ride along swollen creek in partially submerged 'car. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bridges saved Volunteers Out of Water HYNDMAN, Pa. W> "It was a horrible experience, but thank; God my husband and children are all right." So exclaimed Mrs. Nellie Bridges of Corriganville, Md., Wednesday after she dived into: a rain-swollen stream to summon aid for her "husband and three small children, trapped on their partially sub- merged auto. Mrs.-Bridges, 41, who was driving, said she missed, a curv.e on a country road near Pennsylvania-Mary (and line "about 20 miles southwest of and the car plunged into' the creek, Mrs! Bridges said: 'iWe were in about 5 feet of in mid-stream. The wafer was very cold but kept' on going. I hadn't swam for, more than 23 years, long before I was married. But I I had to reach shore." i House Upholds Ike's Vetoing of RE A Bill WASHINGTON House today upheld RAN about a half-mile President Eisenhower's velo of a rural electrification 0 a lamuiuuac BJIU puuucu on help. Two volunteer firemen warn to the car and The vote was 280-146 in favor of passing the bill in upholding the resident. Six Republicans rid 274 Democrats voted to he father and children President's veto. This short of the Bridges, 51, a to override. THE HOUSE passed Jaltimore Ohio the bill originally on April rackman, told his rescuers he md the children spent a har-owing hour. He said the President vetoed the bill last Monday and the Senate overrode the veto five Democrats opposed t and 16 Republicans supported it. Current C3rncu tnc unto SDOUI 00 feet downstream before it wedged against a rock. Kenneth Ray and by a vote of 64-29. The House decision kept ntact Eisenhower's record only Democrat who hanged his position today was Frank M. Clark of Penn- Cay, 3-year-old twins, having had a veto Walter, 4> were taken to Memorial Hospital at Cumber-arid, Md., for Eisenhower promptly issued this Vote Walter had some water in his urigs. The parents am deeply gratified by the vote this morning in Halt Cut :reated for of Representatives the THIS BILL was the Marines Liner Blasted by the President UP) Sen tf_ m %M %O took office early in voted unanimously to Australia bill would to halt a reduction in th Italian liner Australia from Secretary Corps ordered b tfie fire-s wept Ezra Taft tanker Farmand in the power to veto loans leaders in defianc Ocean today and put for rural Congress. a 'doctor to treat eight telephone tacked on to a bi Democrats joined supplemental mone a rider by Sen, Mik 20 LASHES (D-Mont) t h a tie up Navy personne Delaware unless the Leatherneck strength is increased to 200 Whipping of a similar voice vote th Senate Wednesday added by Sen. Russsll B. Lon DOVER, Del. UPl Delaware's legislature, concerned by an increase in (he crime rate, has passed a bill that would require whipping mandatory for people convicted of Army of o The bill says: 20 to 40 lashes for the first offense up army operating fund. not less than 30 for each subsequent The house passed the senate version Wednesday by provided mor vote of 22 to 3. Gov. J. Caleb Boggs, however, than asked by Presider comment when asked what he thought of the -He said he would study it over the weekend arid last year and d a decision early next week about signing it into that the Army be mair If he does sign, it will be the first time in the at and the Mi of the state that whipping has been mandatory at ment for a civilian defens In the old days whipping was used to punish have been reducin beating, theft. and a variety of other crimes, but. it forces, aiming at a always imposed at the discretion of the judge. The of and Marir ent sentence for robbery, for .example, is a fine of not of by the en than and imprisonmnt. for 3-to-25 years, plus current fiscal year nei mon than 40 lashes if the judge 30. Allies Close BerlinMeet, Claim Unity Parley Adjourned Early as Package Deal Completed PARIS for- eign ministers ended their pre-Geneva consultations to- day with unexpectedly quick agreement on a common front for their talks with the Soviet Union on Berlin and other problems, of tense Central Europe. The four-power meeting, which opened here Wednes- day morning with tentative plans for a three-day stand, was adjourned shortly after noon. The foreign ministers, how- ever, arranged a brief new in- formal meeting late today to clear up some unsettled ques tions of strategy, raising the question whether their claimed unity was in fact complete. THE JS E C R E T Western package proposal contains concessions and counter-concessions that the West expects of the So viet Union. But .a U. S. spokesman emphasized, "We are not going to Geneva with the idea of falling back." Drawn up by foreign min- isters of the United States, Britain, France and West Ger- many, the package will be presented to the Soviet Union at a foreign ministers- con- ference opening in Geneva May 11. _ Spokesmen for 'delega- "MISS Barr, tions at the Paris'conference tenced to 15 agreed that complete accord had been reached by the min- isters. A .final communique, (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) Stripper Jailed, Mosk Ready Cohen Vows Aid to Sue L B. for Oil Funds New Tidelands Action Awaits Commission Ruling By HARRY FARRELL Special to Preis-Tefegram SACRAMENTO Atty. Gen. Stanley Mosk has ad- vised the State Lands Com mission the state has "liti gable rights against the city of Long Beach" in connec- Tumor Fouricl Malignant; Condition OK 5-Hour Operation Performed; Upper Lobe Is Removed, NEW YORK (fft Part of Arthur Godfrey's left lung was removed today along with a malignant tumor there. A statement issued shortly after 2 p.m. said of the radio- TV star: "Mr. Godfrey was operated on this morning for rempya! of a tumor in his left lung. The upper lobe of the long was successfully removed with the contained tumor. "He withstood the opera- tion well. His general condi- tion immediately post-opera- tive is good." THE STATEMENT was is- sued by Alvin J. Binkert, ex- ecutive vice president of the STRIP TEASER Candy Barf talks with Mickey Cohen in Hollywood early today after her HOLLYWOOD UP) Strip- teaser Candy Barr was ar- rested early today because her bond was dropped. But Mickey Cohen said he'd help get her a new one. The blonde, green-eyed stripper was arrested at a Sunset Strip night spot be- cause a Dallas, Tex., surety bondsman dropped the bond under which she was free. 27, was sen- years in state prison last year on a charge of unlawful possession of a narcotic She had been appearing at the Largo 2 El Toro Jefs Hit; Pilots Die Two Marine jet pilots died in the 'flaming wreckage of their A4D2 Skyhawk fighters early today when the planes apparently collided in air while making instrument land- ings on fog-shrouded El Toro Marine Air Station, The victims were identified as Capt. Edward J. Kiely, 31, of 1106 S. Cedar St., Santa Ana, and 2nd Lt. Richard S. Fisher, 22, who lived on the El Toro Base. Capt. Kiely is survived by his wife, Barbara Jeane, and children Theresa, 4; Karen, 2; and Cynthia, 1. Lt. Fisher was the son of Mr. and' Mrs. Duane Fisher of Hobbs, N. M. The public information office at the Marine base said both pilots were returning from a cross-country routine training mission. They were making a round-control led instrument approach when they received nstructions for a "wave-off rom the ground control radar operator. SECONDS LATER, the operator lost radio contact with the two craft. Immedi ately, there was an explosion and a burst of flame, Marine observers reported. The burning wreckage was found one mile southwest of El Toro Marine, Base runway a citrus grove. The exact cause of the crash is unknown and is under investigation by Marine air officials. here white out on bond pend- ing an appeal. AFTER HER last' show early today officers of the sheriff's fugitive detail picked ler up on a Dallas warrant and took her to the Hall of Justice for booking. She was wearing a modest gray suit when arrested. Cohen, onetime Los An geles. gambling figure, was in the audience..He followed her downtown' and produced a bail bondsman to seek her a new bond. Cohen describes himself as a "friend" of the dancer. A judge must decide later todaj if she can be freed and wha bonef should be required. MISS BARR'S Dallas law yer, Lester May, said in Dal as bondsman put up the bai nit Hollywood deputies sai the term of the bond'had ex pired. rroops fo Hit Rebels PANAMA UP) Panaman- n troops today were re- orted preparing to go into ction "at any minute" against nvaders from Cuba holed up n the north coast 20 miles rom the entrance to the Pan- ma Canal. A screen of U. S. fighter lanes was ordered up over 'anama's north coast today 3 detect the approach of more invaders reported cross- ng the Caribbean from Cuba 'he Air Patrol was requested y. the five-ambassador team erit by the Organization of American States'to help end he vest-pocket attempt to jverthrow Panamanian Presi dent Ernesto de la Guardia. An informed source who May said of Criminal the marijuana conviction, i granted a 90-day stay fo appeal to the Supreme Court He said he currently wa working on the appeal an would have it ready by th May 18 deadline. when the Court Appeals uphel Head of FBI in L A. Stricken, Is Critical LOS ANGELAS WV-D. K Brown, head of the Los An geles office of the Federa Bureau of Investigation, su fered a heart attack Wednes day night. He was taken t St. Vincent's Hospital, wher his condition was said to b critical. It was the second heart a tack for him in the last tw months. The first attack wa last February. on the fringe of the city's tidelands. The municipally owned property in question is in the :urning-basin area of the Long 3each Inner Harbor. In a letter made public as ;he commission met today Mosk said he is ready to sue the city to establish the state's rights if the commission so directs. 'We have concluded the attorney general con tinued, "that no actions relat ing to this question should be commenced against any other persons at this time." IN EFFECT, Mosk was thus tion with disputed territory Columbia-Presbyterian Medi- cal Center, where the opera- ion was performed. The surgery lasted five lours. Godfrey then was taken to a recovery room. He will.re- main there, until attending physicians feel he has recov- ered sufficiently to be -re- turned to his own room. The operation was begun at a.m. and'was completed at p.m. THE ANNOUNCEMENT that Godfrey's chest tumor was cancerous was made by the hospital at a.m.'. an unusual action for a hospi- tal but probably done because of the prominence of the'pa- tient. Ordinarily information concerning operations is with- held until their completion. The hospital made no com- ment as to the possibility "of recurrence of the malady for Godfrey. The American Cancer So- ciety in its 1959 publication, f. "Cancer Facts and says 34 per cent of lung can- cer victims are saved if the diagnosis is made early and (Continued Page A-5, Col. 2) reported the imminence of st- ack on the invaders said the had held off "special tac- advising the commission not p press lawsuits against irivate firms who hold Inner Harbor property. These firms nclude the Southern Cali- brnia Edison Co., Ford Motor Co. arid the Union Pacific Railroad. The commission took no: action on Mosks' recommen-: dations today. It set further consideration of the matter for its next regular meeting, May 28. However, Chairman Bert Levit state director of fi- nance, announced a special meeting may be called earlier in 10 days to two decision on what action if any the commission may take. IF THE STATE should sue1 cessfuliy assert a claim to the (Continued Page A-5, Col. 3) 5 Top Gymnasts Killed in Crash MADRID, Spain of Spain's top gymnasts were among 28 persons killed in Spanish air- near Madrid WHERE TO FIND IT The State Senate has ap- proved Gov. Brown's labor reform bill 30-6 and sent, it to the Assembly. See Page A-4. the crash of a iner on a hill national guard previously for ics" to protect the in- habitants of Nobre de Dios, .he coastal town taken over >y the invaders who landed ast Saturday from Cuba. THE COMMITTEE of am jassadors recommended that he OAS Council in Washing ton urge Prime Minister Fidel Castro's Cuban government to "exhaust all measures to prevent a new invasion from iwing carried out." In a dispatch from Havana, the New York Times reported that Panamanian rebels are plotting a symbolic grab of the canal if they overthrow De La Guardia. The United States has permanent juris- diction over the waterway and the zone on each side of it under a treaty between Panama and the United States. Wednesday. The twin-engine DC3 of the ;overnment-owned Iberie Air- iner was en route from Bar- celona to Madrid. Oificials alamed bad weather for the crash. Beach B-l. Hal A-21. A-21. C-5 to 11. B-10, 11. A-15. Death B-2. A-20. B-3. Shipping C-5. C-l, 2, 3. A-18. Tides, TV, C-l 2. Vital C-5. A-21. B-5, 6, 7. Your A-2. IGNORE HUSBANDS Weather- Low clouds and fog tonight, but mostly sun- ny Friday and cooler. Maximum temperature to notm today: 69. Roadblocks Resumed by Wives in Strike OKMULGEE, Okla. were continued for the third day today by wives of striking Phillips. Petroleum Co. workers. The women, ignoring pleas by their husbands and union leaders to "go have stopped at least 25 refinery tank trucks at three access roads to the refinery. The strike by 103 Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers Union members is now in its 76th day. Only two trucks maneuvered through the blockade since Tuesday. The women started their human blockades 100 yards from the plant after the union denied their request for permission to join the picket lines at refinery gates. "We're not trying to be smart or show up our hus- said one of the women. "We merely feel that after months, something must be done to try to bring the company to terms." Plant Supt. tucian Vautrain has said the blockades "a violation of but the company has had no other comment.   

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