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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: April 22, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 22, 1959, Long Beach, California                             PAIR ON PIER GIVES UP just Bluff, Say Felons About Woman Hostage U. S. REJECTS RUSSIAN NOTE ON NATO A-ARMS Kremlin Rips HOME MRS. LOUISE San Francisco housewife, and Douglas Harrison 'relax on fishing pier adjacent to San Quentin Prison after they were released 'by two escaped convicts who held them hostage six P Photo) Dancer Freed IjyPanama MIAMI from a Pahamian jail, British bal- lerina Margot Fonteyn flew to Miami today but she refused to discuss charges against her husband of plotting a revolt in Panama, The government releaset her after holding her for 2 ier before surrendering Tues- lay, say theye were bluffing. "We really didn't want no hostage, just a car to get said Billy Joe Wright, 26. Mrs. Louise Gschwend (pronounced Gish- 54, agreed. "1 hope these boys get a she declared. "They didn't hurt me. They gave me a break." "I don't think they ever would have killed she Seat Herter as State Chief WASHINGTON tian A. Herter was sworn in as new secretary of state to prpmptly country. expelled from the 7; A; Ijttle .over .an hoiir after arrival' in Miami aboard a Paviagra plane, Dame Margot b'oarded National Airlines' Bight 400 for a 4-.hour trip to- Idlewild Airport ini New York. REPORTERS WHO met the ballerina received d i m p e d sbiites but virtually no '-an- swers to their questions. A.' good-humored "no corn- merit" was given to queries about her treatment in ih- arrja, her husband's where- abouts and her feelings about predicament. telephone calls from London were awaiting Margot on her arrival anil; she took them in an air- poft office. Later, she scurried around seeking additional 'reservations. JUST BEFORE the takeoff fpf New York, she finally re- plied to a question as to her future plans. She said she would open June 2 in the added. At the beginning of the or- deal, she continued, "1 was scared. I felt sick and I was faint. When I almost faint ed, .one of the boys wrapped my coat around me." THE TRUSTY who did that was William D. Werner, 24. Eloth he and Wright had jail- break records. They broke away ifrom work parties outside the bleak walls of the huge pris- on 20 miles north of San Francisco, Wright fleeing from a grass-mowing party and Werner from the prison quarry with guards in hot pursuit. They slid along a fence un til they came to a wall anc that the West could torpedo the Geneva foreign ministers meeting on German issues by going ahead with NATO de fense measures. The Big Four ministers wil meet next month. State Department Press Of icer Lincoln White declared n a statement that what the Soviet government seeks is to get the West to "discontinue he defensive measures it has undertaken against the threat day. President' Eisenhower posed by Soviet armed pledged him full backing. might." With the President anc virtually the entire cabinet ooking on, Herter became the nation's 54th full-time foreign policy chief in a brie White House ceremony. 'God bless Eisen hower said. "All the people of the United States hope for your success." EISENHOWER said he and cancer-stricken John Foster Dulles "were as one in decid- ing you were the best quali- fied to take over the office of secretary of state." "SOVIET achieve this EFFORTS to White Ballet Undine at Covent Gar- dens in London. She added that she didn't know just when she would leave New York. then slipped between them Failing to find a car, they ran down the half-m i 1 e-1 o n g wharf that juts into San Fran Cisco Bay near the prison en- trance. Mrs. Gschwend, a- beauty operator, was fishing there with Doug Harrison, 62, a ho- telman and friend of 35 years. Her husband, Walter, was orking as a hotel bellman. 1 live in San Francisco. Herter, standing erect with- out the crutches ,he some- imes uses, told Eisenhower, You can't know how much t means to have your confi- dence." Shaking Herter's hand, Ei- senhower said "You know you have that." His tones amounted to a pledge of support. THE CEREMONY the cabinet room. Eisenhower escorted Herter there from his office. said, "can only be regarded in the West as completely hypocritical so long as the Soviet Union itself fails to in- dicate its willingness to en- gage in controlled disarma- ment. There is no evidence that the Soviet government is ready to halt its own produc tion and deployment of mod ern weapons." Asked whether he was say- ing that the Western powers were going ahead with their decision of December 1957 to arm NATO with nuclear mis- siles, 'White said that "of course the decision of the NATO Council is being imple- mented." (ILLS FOR Russia has long raised ob- jections to putting nuclear weapons in the hands of West German forces. The Moscow concentration on this ques- tion indicates that Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei ANTI-CASTRO DEMONSTRATORS SQUELCHED Police guarding the tumultuous welcome for Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro at New York's Pennsylvania Station Tuesday close in to squelch one of a group of six anti-Castro demonstrators. These were be rthe only about U. N. Host to Castro for the Day NEW YORK Prime Minister Fidel Castro, in battle fatigues, arrived at the United Nations shortly after noon today for a visil with Sec. Gen. Dag Hammar Red Chinese Turn Tibet Into Prison Thousands Whipped Daily; Nuns Sent Into Army Camps By M. M. GUPTA KATHMANDU, Nepal, Communist Chinese troops have turned Tibet into a vast prison with thousands Tibetans being whipped each day in the streets and Buddhist nuns sent to army camps for the pleasure of the troops, refugees fleeing to Nepal reported today. They said that nearly Tibetan monasteries were damaged or destroyed by Communist artillery in past month and nearly monks killed, arrested and about lamas forced to flee homeless and nungry into the mountains. Tunnel Blast Kills 3 at Oroville Dam Site OROVILLE men .were killed and two injured Tuesday when dynamite ex- ploded in a small tunnel at "the site of the Oroville Dam ;on the Feather River. Donald Goode, 40, job su- perintendent from Granc Junction, Colo.; Robert Ar nold, 45, and Chester Zurich both of Oroville, were Wiled. Frank Snipe and An drew Cannifax of Oroville Injured. WHERE TO FIND IT Mrs. Herter is heiress, bu doesn't show it. Story Pag A-3. Beach B-l. Hal A-27. A-27. C-S to 12. B-14, 15. Death B-2. A-2S.' B-3. 'Shipping C-t. C-l lo 5. B-l2, 13. Tides, TV, A-28. Vita! .C-t. A-27. B-5, ft, 7. Your A-2. HARRISON RECALLED at "Louise let out a scream nd I saw they had a knife As the President left he shook hands with some of his cabinet officers who were lined up on the side of the room with Herter. In .addressing Herter, Ei- senhower said that he and the 64-year-old former Massachu- setts governor were "hoping and praying for Foster's (Dul- les) early recovery." Mrs. Dulles attended the brief ceremony. Also present myko will raise it as an issue at the foreign ministers con- ference opening in Geneva May 11. THE 15-NATION North At- lantic Council decided at Paris in December 1957, that NATO forces in Western Eur- ope should have missile bases with stocks of U. S.-con- (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) He also planned to speak to U. N. correspondents. There were shots of "Fidel Fidel" from a crowd of abou 250 as the Cuban leader's mo torcade drew up at the sec retariat building. CASTRO Pierre de WAS MET Meulemeester ome any closer er' but I think her neck." He added that 'right "told officers 'don't or I'll kill they were ust bluffing all the time." Wright and Werner, with Garrison carrying messages Continued Page A-6, Col. 5} was the former younger brother, secretary's Allen Dul- les, who is director of the Central Intelligence Agency. FROM HIS hospital bed, former Secretary Dulles coun- (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) Suspect in Hit-Run Rams Sheriff Car A hit-run suspect was hurt this morning when his fleeing auto smashed headon into a sheriff's car near the city lim its on Cherry Ave. Kicking and screamini wildly, Richard Ray Daries 25, of 2318 San Anseline Ave was rushed hy ambulance to Community Hospilal. He suf- fered head injuries in the col- lision, officers said. Daries' auto crashed into a sheriff's patrol car driven by Deputy Roger J. Cahan in the block -of Cherry Ave. Cahan was not hurt. AT THE NEPAL-TIBET a few miles north of 'Good-Looking Kid1 Knifes Woman, 65 COLORADO SPRINGS veteran police hief describes him as "a good-looking kid nice per- onality fine intelligence." That's the way 15-year-old Richard.Walter Skeels ooks on the outside, Chief I. B. Bruce said today. Butf rom inside this boy; 5- eet-6, 130 pounds, came a hocking confession, Bruce aid. The youngster admit- ed Tuesday night stabbing a 114-inch hunting, knife 43 times into the body of Mrs 7Iorence D. Martin, 65, city Belgium, actingiV. N. chief o protocol; Minuel Bisbee, Cu ban ambassador to the U. M and Robert.o Huertematt U. N. commissioner of publ assistance. They escorted hir :o Hammarskjold's. office t the 38th floor. Castro was e pected to remain at the U. N. most of the day. An unusual security force was mustered to watch over the Cuban leader. It included 90 U. N. guards 40. more than the normal shift. EARLIER at his hotel, the prime minister met with Cu- ban newsmen and photogra- phers. His press secretary, (yas Truck Burns Up; Man Cut A 21-year-old truck driver escaped with a cut hand a noon today when his gasoline tanker flipped over and burs into flames at Willow St. and the Long Beach Freeway. Julian L. Arnold, 4111 E. llth St., an employe of the itan Oil Co., was traveling ast on Willow St. and at- mpted to turn onto the ramp o go south on the freeway. welfare alone. "One worker who of the most viciofi murders I've ever sai etray Tibetan patriots. "Every Tibetan was a pris- Thote said. whole country was turned, nto a vast prison. Dusk-to- lawn curfews were imposed alt over Tibet and did no't allow normal living. "THOUSANDS of peaceful, nnocent Tibetans were being whipped daily in open places in the course of questioning and. inhumane methods were being applied for confession. Mostly the people preferred Mrs. Ernestina Ottero, barred American reporters, saying it was a "private conversation" which would produce no ews. Castfo was given an en- thusiastic welcome to New York Tuesday. "I was going a little too he told officers. THE SEMI-TRUCK and railer, loaded with gal- ons .of gasoline, rolled over complete revolution and ame to rest on the driver's side, partway down an em- BILLY JOE WRIGHT one of the two escaped San Quentin convicts, is led from fishing pier hy POLICE SAID the chase started when Danes' car struck two autos at Cherry Ave. and Del Amo Blvd. The other drivers were not hurt. Long Beach Officer H. C. Deck took off in pursuit. Deck tried four times to force Danes' car to the curb, but each time the fleeing auto pulled away from him. Police said Daries had to be strapped to a stretcher for the ride to the hospital. He later was transferred to MECHANIC an officer after surrendering. (AP Wirephoto) [county General Hospital Drinks Brakt Fluid in Soda Pop Bottle VANCOUVER, B. C. garage mechanic crawled under an auto- mobile Tuesday, a soft- drink bottle in hand to ease his thirst. Under the car was an other pop bottle, with brake fluid in it. Doctors pumped out his stomach but declined to re I lease his name. Bruce. "He wanted money arid thought she had it." Skeels lived a block an a half away from the widow' lome with his mother and stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. John Fitzpatrick. "HE DID IT for one dol- Bruce said. "We found the bloody bill in his the chief went on. "He doesn't show a bit of remorse and is quite calm." The youth was arrested when he went to a hospital for treatment of a deep cut on a little finger. Under questioning of Bruce, Skeels quickly spilled the story of the robbery-murder Monday night. Officers found Mrs. Mat- to confess as desired by the Chinese than stand tortures and longer." "Large numbers of nuns, who locally are called "en- have been forced-to live in army camps at the pleas- ure of the Chinese. Several nuns reportedly committed suicide to escape Chinese brutalities." lankment. Arnold clambered out the passenger side. The burning truck and its oad sent a cloud of black 3moke several hundred feet nto the air. Firemen quickly controlled the blaze and a minor grass fire which re- sulted. Weather- Cloudy tonight and early Thursday. Mostly sunny Thursday. Not much change in tem- perature. Maximum tem- perature by noon today: 72. tin's slashed body in the liv- ing room. They went to in- vestigate late Tuesday after fellow workers became alarmed at her absence. No charges have been filed against Skeels. 60 Yanks Give Blood for Wounded Chinese TAIPEI, 'Formosa ty men of the U. t. 7th Fleet donated Chinese blood Tuesday for Nationalist soldiers wounded by Communist bombing of the Quemoy Is- lands. The Nationalist's official Palm Springs Crash Kills Five in Cars PALM SPRINGS (UPI) Five persons were killed arid wo others suffered critical njuries when two cars cql- ided at a highway tumoff to this desert resort area. The California "Highway Pa- trol said occupants of both cars apparently-: all were adults but identification was held up pending arrival at Desert Hospital here of the injured. A CHP officer described the crash as the worst of its kind he had ever seen. He said one car evidently crashed into the other at an inter- section on U. S. Highway 99- 60-70. Drivers of the cars, both men, were killed and one man. Central News Agency said was pinned between the ve- the Chinese were "deeply hides. Bodies of victims touched by this expression of were brought to a mortuary true American friendship." here.   

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