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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: April 21, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 21, 1959, Long Beach, California                             N. C. Violence Erupts, Tri AIIC Strikers Yell ThreatsI LLIflld HOLD POLICE AT HOME The Finetl Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, APRIL Vol. 67 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 28 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-11C1 EDITION (Six Editions- Daily) Flee to End of Long Pier NearQuentin STRIKERS JEER at workers leaving cotton mill in Henderson, N. C., today. The workers had spent night inside the plant after wave of Senate Confirms Herter Selection WASHINGTON Senate today unani- mously confirmed the nomination of Christian A. Herter as secretary of state. The roll call vote was 93-0. Setting aside rules, the Senate acted swiftly after its Foreign Relations Committee had voted unani- HENDERSON, N. C. Lines of angry, jeering strik- ers, some of whom slooc siege all night outside the Harriet Henderson cotton mills, shouted threats today as 100 state highway patrol- men escorted workers in and out following a new outburst of violence. About 300 non-strikers, ad- vised to sleep inside the two plants overnight because of Bridges Says He'd Bar War Aid to Chiang Infers to Solons He Would Order Coastal Walkout WASHINGTON Bridges, Pacific Coast water- front leader, testified today "I'd do what I could" to pre- vent United States aid to Nationalist China in event of war between the National N. Y. Roars Greeting fo Cosfiro the angry crowds gathered left under police of the nomination. Herter, who has served more than two years as under- secretary, succeeds cancer- "Come on out, yotf stricken John Foster Dulles. Drilled one woman striker. _' __i.'.__, were afraid to come THE SENATE confirmed Herter after Sen.-Lyndon B. Johrispn majority colleagues: do .not .only -'Want Mr.. Herter to I ;want the whole last night." get ists and Red China. The chain-smoking dock boss, testifying before the House Committee on Un- American Activities, callec U.S. help for Generalissimo Chiang Ksi-chek "outrage Bridges invoked the Fifth Amendment to refuse to say lether he had been a Com- munist. He said it was the first time in my life he had screamed NEW YORK crowd estimated at persons roared a wild welcome today to Cuban Premier Fidel Cas- tro on his arrival in New York. !-About cheering, flag- vyaiving admirers greeted him Pennsylvania Station. 'The others surged about as h> made his way by automo- bile from the station to the nearby Statler Hotel, POLICE KEPT the crowd in the station behind barricades, but the revolutionary leader refused to go immediately through a cleared path' to a waiting automobile. "I' want to speak to the Castro told his party. Some of his followers lifted him to their shoulders and tried to carry him toward a stairway in hopes he would use it as a speaking plat- form. !He -was, caught up in a press of policemen, report- bers of his own party. AT ONE POINT, the crush became so great that Richard Patterson city greeter who had welcomed Castro on the train platform, exclaimed: "I can't take this. I'd best get ;he hell out of here." Castro, at the suggestion of police officials, gave up the plan to speak and strode to the automobile. A police escort surrounded the automobile at it moved slowly to the hotel through a surging crowd that thundered cheer after cheer. BITTERNESS welled claimed his right against incrimination. constitutional possible self- world to knpwt-that we are VP, the hundreds of united behind1: him' as secre- strikers Monday night when tary of state." i" 'he Textile Workers Union of Herter America, rejected a settle- plauded at a.Corning appear- ment reached last week. The ance before ihV union asserted that the mills lations Committee. had broken an agreement to He-told the -group .the rehire strikers to man the air route to Berlin would shift which began defended but-noi-necessarily [work Monday. at the risk of iuJcle'ar'Vyar. The 64-year-old Herter may now 'attend .a conference of western foreign ministers at hired. He said the union hac .Instead, asserted Boyd Pay tori, the union's Carolinas director, only 30 strikers were Paris next week with' the same full stature of office as his counterparts. HERTER HAD told the committee-he did not believe atomic and hydrogen bombs would be justified in' the early stages if war developed over Berlin. Herter told the Sen- ate. Foreign Relations Com- mittee, "if it became clear that Russia was resorting to all-out war, 1 think we would have to.consid our position." Herter gave this view un- der prolonged questioning by Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore) at a hearing in which the ap- plause of-other members sug gested overwhelming approv- al of his nomination. Herter said that "without understood in the presence o Gov. Luther Hodges, who mediated at the settlement "that the top figure of jobs not available to our peopli was 436. he continued, "w< ind out from the company that they had already hire roposing tighter passport aws to prevent travel abroad by Communists or others deemed to be security risks. THE SUPREME COURT ast June ruler in favor of llustrator Rockwell Kent and Walter Briehi on their con- tention that the State Depart- ment has no right to deny passports to U. S. citizens on PROBLEMS IN THE LEGISLATURE WhileThomas D. Beds ley, speaker of the-Florida House of Representatives, carries the busi- ness of Jawmaking, his Sandra Weiss, 4, wrestles with a problem of her her1 the speaker's POPULAR GUESS GAME Red Chinese Hike Budget for Military 16 Pet. Increase Laid to Rebellion by Tibetan Tribes TOKYO China announced today it is increas- ing its military spending and foreign aid program this year. At the same time it indi- cated the new peasant com munes are not carrying the load expected of them. The arms budget rises 16 per cent to yuan, which the Chinese re- gard as the equivalent of billion dollars. That doesn't put China in the Big Four class, but manpower is -cheap and money buys more among the Red Chinese: Six hundred million yuan 218 per cent more than last year, is earmarked for aid to other countries. That's rated at about 260 million dollars. These developments, per- haps both tied to, the Tibetan were disclosed by Finance Minister Li Hsein- nein before the National Peo- ple's Congress in Peiping, Red China's parliament. The rebellion has forced Red China to send more sup- plies and reinforcements to Chinese garrisons on the Ti- betan roof of the world. Pei- Knife at Throat of Hostage as Copter Ring Site SAN QUENTIN convicts armed with knives escaped San Quentin Prison today and, holding a woman hostage, were trapped out on the open e_nd of a long fish- ing pier. Unable to escape, they kept guards and police at a dis- tance by threatening the woman's life. A Coast Guard helicopter hovered over the pier and Coast Guard and police boats patrolled it to prevent escape by water. Prison Warden 'Fred ft. Dicksbn went out on the pier to try to talk the' fugitives into surrender. Two hours after he began talking to 'them they were still holding out. ping may hope creased foreign security basis. In. opening the four-day Mice-in-Space Idea 1 of Many Projects By GEOFFREY GOULD WASHINGTON flight forecasts are popping out all everything from sending mice into orbit within a month to sending a man to the moon and back within eight years. Project Nova, Project Score, Project Courier, Proj- ect Transit, Project Tiros, Project Midas take your pick. They've all got some ex- citing idea to ignite the imag- PRISON OFFICIALS said any attempt to rush the pair could only result in harm to the woman. She had been fishing from the wharf when seized. The escaped convicts were both .serving time for bur- glary. They are Billy Joe Wright, Werner, 24. They escaped from prison work details at a.m.' "I saw those two convicts running down the pier, the guards after said Wayne Brooks, a-San Rafael bar owner. "There were about 20' to 25 people on the pier an4 then the had a this woman and held a knife to her throat. "They told the guards not to come any closer, or they'd kill the woman. They went through m-out on the end of the pjer> aid to buy yeiijng to the guards to get them a boat so they could get away." back prestige it lost through repressive measures against the Dalai Lama's people. THE .PIER, belonging' to RADIO PEIPING broadcast the.Marih Rod and Gun Club', hearing Chairman Francis E. Walter (D-Pa) said that as a result of that court decision "the bars are down." "Communist agents, propa- gandists and communist sym- pathizers have a blanket invi- tation to come and go as they he said. 'This situa tion is of direct benefit to the international communist movement, and of direct det- riment to security interests of our nation." Assembly Kills Death Ban Bill SACRAMENTO Legislature refused today to abolish capital punishment. After the longest debate of the current session, the As- sembly voted 43-35 against Assemblyman Lester A. Mc- Millan's bill to declare an eight-year moratorium on the death penalty. (Earlier story on Page A-2.) Weather- Mostly clear through Wednesday except for ,some late night or early low clouds or fog. Little change in tem- perature. ination. The mice-in-space forecast came Monday from Roy W. Johnson, director of the Ad- vanced Research Projects Agency, in a speech Republican Women's Group. He also outlined hopefully most of the other projects due for later development. JOHNSON SAID the Dis- coverer II satellite, launched April 13 and nearing the end of its orbit, has had a "truly fantastic success." He added, "We now plan to launch Dis- (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) Godfrey Hopeful on Tumor the Congress proceedings on a budget that is framed to balance at yuan. Revenue is expected to be 10 billion yuan and ex penditures 11 billion more than last year. The Chinese figure one yuan is worth about 43 cents. By Peiping standards the (Continued Page A-5, Col: 2) in the San Fran- Except for the is only -a- few hundred yards from the prison. It runs half a mile out cisco Bay. clubhouse adjacent to shore, the pier is bare except for guard rails. Achuff said Wright was working with a grass cutting crew on the grounds when he slipped away. Werner fled from the rock quarry. WHERE TO FIND .IT Travelers from Iraq report Communists have virtually taken over that oil-rich na- tion's major cities. A-3. See Page NEW YORK had i helluva lot of luck in my ime, probably more than any one person has a right to de- serve, and maybe I'll be lucky again." That was television star Arthur Godfrey's comment as le announced he will enter a New York hospital later this week for examination of a chest tumor. "it's probably just a be- nign Godfrey added. '1 have at least three good omens. I feel good, my weight hasn't gone down and my ap- petite's fine." GODFREY X-rays taken after STEEPLE FALLS AS FIRE DESTROYS CHURCH Steeple atop the St, Mary Roman Catholic Church at Westphalia, Mich., is ablaze but still standing at left as fire sweeps through the 91-year-old land- mark today, Center, the steeple begins to collapse and at right is shown in its final.fall. Fire loss was estimated at Wirephoto.) Beach B-l. Hal C-4 to B-4, 7. A-4. Death B-2. A-8. B-3. Shipping B-8. C-I, 2, 3, 4. Tides, TV, C-10. Vital C-4. B-4, 5. Your A-2. SAID he had last Thursday suffering from chest pains. He said the X-rays showed up the tumor, but doctors couldn't tell if it was benign or malignant. He is taking a leave from his broadcasting activities. He left Monday for his farm in Virginia, where he will do the remainder of this week's shows. Later this week he will make a tape recording of his television show for'next Tuesday night. He is expect- ed to be in the hospital by Tuesday. How long he will be off the air is not certain. Godfrey is 55. He has been broadcasting for 30 years. CARBON COPY IN COURAGE Fire victim Chuck Gelardi, 10-year-old Little Leag-. uer from Worcester, Mass., holds photo of his Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox, after a skin- grafting operation. Chuck was delighted to have a "collar" like Williams, who wore one because pf a neck strain. "Now if I could just belt the bifl like said Chuck. The boy has had seven op- erations in six months and faces more. He won medal for quelling fire in his t   

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