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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: April 18, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 18, 1959, Long Beach, California                             MILITIA ASSAULT ON PRISON FREES GUARDS, 'STOOLIE' FELONS Revolt Chief Kills Pal, Self in Face of Heavy Firing By JACK ZYGMOND DEER LODGE, Mont. armed Na- tional Guardsmen stormed the Montana State Prison early today and rescued 16 guards held hostage for 36' hours by die-hard rioting convicts. j The surprise attack began at a.m. The 50i guardsmen moved in under cover of bazooka, machine-! gun and rifle fire. Two were wounded, neither seriously. Officials HOME The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1959 18 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 Vol. 65 TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) WEAPON AGAINST RIOTERS Sgt. William Rose, National Guardsman from Mis- soula, Mont., fired this bazooka three times early today in battle against rioting Montana prisoners. ASKS U. S. TRADE TREATY Castro Skips Tour of Capital Shrines WASHINGTON leader Fidel Castro today called off a tour of historic sites in Washington. His press secretary said he had some other matters to Dalai Lama Ends Silence, Blasts Reds Says Monasteries Destroyed, Monks Put in Labor Gangs TEZPUR, India Iff) The Snow, Rain Storms Hit Mid-U.S. attend to. The announcement of the cancellation of the trip to the Lincoln Monument, Jefferson Memorial and other shrines was made by press secretary Esther Guzman. The tour might be made Sunday, she indicated. t IT APPEARED to be a day for relaxation for the bearded Cuban premier, after a gruel- ing session with the American Society of Newspaper Editors Friday at which he outlined his country's needs. The only official events on today's schedule are a private lunch at the -Cuban Embassy, and a diplomatic reception for an estimated diplomats and officials there this eve- ning. LIGHT RAINFALL also hit Miss Guzman did not ex- plain what other matters Snow and spring storms hit the central section of the na- tion today. Snow developed in western Nebraska and South Dakota The Weather heavy snow Bureau issued warnings for some areas in the belief, that depth the fall may reach a of four inches or more. Thunderstorms boomed from Kansas southward to Texas. Rain and hail peltec Oklahoma City. Dalai Lama today accuset the Chinese Communists destroying Tibetan teries, killing sending monks in labor gangs. The fugitive 23-year-old god-king disclosed that thei seeds of the revolt that spread over the little Hima- layan country were sown as far back as 1955. The Dalai Lama issued a statement denouncing the Communists on arriving in this tea-growing town and declared he came to India of his "own free will." He slipped out of his palace in Lhasa a' month ago to seek refuge in India. Red China's Premier Chou En-lai was still insisting to- day that young man revered said it appeared one of the two riot leaders, lopelessly cornered in the prison's northwest tower, shot I he other and then committed suicide. Early reports indicated both had committed suicide but Highway Patrol Capt. Alex B. Stephenson and Powell Coun- ty Coroner Ralph J. Beck said after examining the bodies that it appeared Lee Smart shot Jerry Myles through the head and then shot himself under the chin. t SMART, 19, was impris- oned for murdering a Colo- rado salesman and the 44- year-old Myles was a burglar Lamas a 'one cr'mmal record. Five inmates held hostage by the rebellious convicts as "stool pigeons" also were res- cued by the guardsmen. Three tough convicts con- ceded to be riot leaders along with Myles and Smart sur- as the surged into Ike to Name Herter Secretary of State as "the living Buddha" had rendered meekly guardsmen compound. t ONE OF THE CONVICTS, George Alton, serving 15 years for burglary and an bid hand at committing crimes, said Montana's parole sys- tem was the major reason for the riot which cost Deputy Warden Theodore Roth, 40, his life at the outset. Alton contended there was an "injustice in granting pa the Rockies and the Far Northwest. During the day, the U. S.i Weather Bureau in Chicago forecast a steady advance of shower activity eastward to the .fringes of the Atlantic Seaboard. While rain monopolized the weather bill of fare, normal springtime temperatures reigned in most sectors. Most precipitation pelted an area that extended from Minnesota through the Great Lakes south through the lower Mississippi Valley and Texas. At least a half inch of rain splattered most points in the lower Mississippi Valley. Memphis, Tenn., was doused by 1.42 inches while nearly an inch was reported at Green- wood, Miss. A BARRAGE of thunder- storms cut a wide through northeast Oklahoma, southeastern Kansas, Mis- souri and southern Illinois. A small tornado four farms near Freeport, in northwestern Illinois, Friday afternoon. Heavy winds and hail up to two inches in diameter ha- rassed Baxter Springs in southeast Kansas. Earlier Fri- day, Whiteoak, an Oklahoma community, saw a tornado swoop down and damage three barns. Heavy hail also lashed at Nowata and Adair in northeast Oklahoma. To the north, a steady Fri- day rain dumped 1.15 inches at Dubuque, Iowa. Castro had to attend to. IKE AND NEW SECRETARY OF STATE President Eisenhower is shown today at Summer White House with Chris- tian Herter, whom he named secretary of state to succeed John Foster Dulles. ONE OF HIS major goals, he told the editors, is to ward off communism by wiping out poverty and hunger. Speaking at length on Cuban economic problems, he said his country needs a "just treaty of commerce" with the United States to get money for building factories and re- forming agriculture. He also appealed for Amer- ican tourist trade. With his usual flair for flamboyance, Castro appeared before a packed meeting of editors and guests in his standard fa- tigue uniform, shirt open at the neck. HE STUCK gamely to (Continued Page A-3, Col. 6) >een kidnaped by Tibetan re- aels. He expressed hope hej would return to his capital in Lhasa. BREAKING traditional si- lince, the Dalai Lama charged in a statement that the Chinese Communists had broken their 1951 pro- mise to respect Tibetan au- tonomy. "By the end of he said, "a struggle had started (Continued Page A-3, Col. 4} roles." A succession of oners told newsmen that "we: want paroles for the man, not the crime." They asserted thatj sex offenders get Montana pa-' roles more easily than rob- iers and burglars. The storming of the riot rea followed hours of plan- ling supervised by Col. Wil- iam C. Benson of the Mon- ana National Guard. Two lundred posted in WATER ROW Hunt Woman Light Earthquake Jolts San Salvador SAN SALVADOR, El Sal- vador light earthquake shook this city early today and was felt in varying de across the country, was reported. From Rabies INDIANAPOLIS (ffl J woman was believed driving oday through southern Indi- les ana, unaware that her life Los was in danger. The woman, known to po- ice only as Mrs. Alma White, ,vas bitten by a rabid skunk Thursday night as she trav- eled with her husband cross- country from Denver, Colo. Indiana police were alerted by Colorado authorities. She did not know the ani- mal was diseased and failed to have the wound properly treated. Police said Mrs. White must have rabies injections by noon today or face the No chance of the wound becom- ing fatal, Someone Turn the Thing Off! LOS ANGELES (CNS) When Homer E. Fritcher, 25, lost control of his car and ran into a fire hydrant early today he woke up five water concerns and touched off a 3 -hour argument over who was to turn off the water. tnglewood police said Frit- cher clipped off the hydrant at Manchester Ave. and Free- man Blvd., which is right on the corner of county terri- tory, and water shot 60 feet into the air. They contacted the Ingle- wood City Water Co., County Water Department, Los Ange- guardsmen were a ring around -the prison.'Teams were set up to [o inside the wall, including icven units of riflemen, iwo earns of firefighters and the medics. That was Thursday night several hours after the Investment Water Co Angeles Department o Water and Power, and South ern California Water Co. THE ACCIDENT occurred at 3 a.m., and at a.m the five concerns were stil arguing over who had juris diction over the hydrant an oom penetrated the stillness. The guardsmen broke for the entrance tower of Cellhouse They used five rounds of Ml rifle fire to blow the lock The the cellhouse. A bazooka rocket shook the tower wall. time of the accident today visibility was down to about 100 yards. The Harborough :ook water rapidly through a large hole in her bow after striking the wreck. out of a big oak door, riflemen converged on MATTRESSES tossed over (Continued Page A-3, Cot. 4) WHERE TO FIND IT A-4, 5. B-2 to 9. A-8. A-2. Death B-lfl. Financial. Shipping A-3. A-6, 7, A-2. Tides, A-2. TV, B-IO. summer trots, were rescued. Yanks Flood-Hit Argentines BUENOS AIRES, Argentina from the The general manager of the j Leamington Fair, J. R. Dean, Quick Senate )K Expected Next Week Dulles Successor Silent on Question of Policy Changes AUGUSTA, Ga. ian Herter today was named >y President Eisenhower to >e the new secretary of state. The President personally announced his choice with lerter, under-secretary since 1957, standing at his side at a news conference. Herter is being elevated to. the cabinet to succeed cancer- stricken John Foster Dulles, who resigned last Wednesday. The President announced his intention to send Herter's nomination to the Senate next week. Swift confirmation has been predicted. HERTER WAS ASKED whether he plans any change in U. S. foreign policy. He re- plied with a smile he does not want to get into that matter until he has been confirmed. The new secretary, 64, also declined to speculate on who will succeed him as under- secretary. He added, however, that ha believes it is "a reasonable (Continued Page A-3, Col. 1) more than Most of the horses were owned by Quebecers. Two of! them belonged to Harvey i Hyatt of Leamington. Thej heaviest losers were Johnny Charbonneau and Hal each of whom had five of CORTEZ HUNT U.S. icebreaker Edisto out over stricken areas today! to rescue persons marooned! THE ANIMALS were to by floods which have taken moved Monday- some to Hazel 'Park, Mich., least 29 lives. The Edisto back to the was en route United States from Antarctica Friday when it changeS course after Ar- gentine President Arturo Frondizi accepted its offer of aid. The video, going ship went to Monte- Uruguay, instead of to Buenos Aires, order to get its helicopters into Operation faster. Flood Relief KILLED WITH 26 OTHERS Baby Was Delivered on Ill-Fated Airliner MEXICALI, Mexico UP) He said they were the only A baby was born aboard a Mexican airliner about 30 minutes before it exploded in flight Friday near Guaymas on the Gulf of California. The Inglewood City Water The baby was killed along Co. finally agreed to turn 26 other passengers on mas to have an ambulance women aboard the plane who were in an advanced state of pregnancy. THE OFFICIAL said the pilot radioed ahead to Guay- 3 Cubans Executed; Unofficial Total 513 HAVANA men were executed at Havana's La Cabana Fortress today on war crimes convictions, rais- ng the unofficial total of war crimes executions to 513 since Fidel Castro's forces took er Jan. 1. Firing squads shot an ex-policeman, an ex- corporal and a civilian who worked for the police under former President. Fulgencio Batista. off. Fritcher was not and no charges were filed, police the streets around Manchester and Free- man were pretty wet early to- day. I the twin-engine C46. injured I An airline official at scene of the wreckage said to- day the baby was born either to Mrs. Anita Lugan of West Los Angeles or Mrs. Narcala Cazare of Tijuana. ready at the airfield because the.of the birth. The Tigres Voladores Lines plane from off Mexicali and others to Richelieu, race track in -the spring harness racing season. The alarm was turned in by Morris Kearsey of Chathan who was asleep in the tack room of the iing. He said he was awakened by smoke before 5 a.m. and roused several other stable boys nearby. While there was no official opinion of the origin of the blaze, Kearsey said it might have started from an electric switch box. The flames spread rapidly through the rest of the frame structure and quickly trated to the loft where nearly 500 bales of hay were stored. 3 Digging Wildly for Gems Cache OCEANSIDE Southern California men were digging furiously today for a cache of gems and diamonds believed to have been buried near here by one of Hernando Cortez's lieutenants in the 16th Century. Sam Farmer, 71, of Lindsey; Wilford Earl Barnes, 41, of Whittier; and Wayne Porter, 29, of La Puente, have passed he 10-foot mark in digging :or the treasure of Francisco de Ulloa. The three men said their search at the west end of the Weather for Mexico cloudy tonight. Sunday City and exploded hoursl afternoon. Little change San Luis based on Cuba Arrests 50 as Plot Suspects CARDENAS, Cuba Fif ty persons have been taken into custody for questioning about, a counter-revolution ary plot. A Havana newspaper said the alleged plotters were followers of former dictator Fulgencio Batista who planned to rescue a number of war later. in temperature. criminals tcnce. under death sen- Rey Valley information was ob- tained from Dr. J. J. Markey, president of the San Luis Rey Historical Society. A "witching wand" (forked stick such as those used for divining water) was being used by the treasure hunters. Gang Throws Youth Over 25-Foot Cliff LA JOLLA youth is n critical condition today after a rat-pack gang beat him and threw him over a 25- foot cliff to the beach. Attendants at Scripps Me- morial Hospital said Jack D. Alice, 21, of La Mesa, has a skull fracture. Two of the victim's com- panions also were beaten.   

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