Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: April 15, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Press Telegram

Location: Long Beach, California

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 15, 1959, Long Beach, California                             DULLES QUITS AS STATE SECRETARY FOSTER "DULLES, whose resignation as Sec- retary of State was announced today, managed a .smile despite his ailment as he re-entered Walter Reed -Hospital in Washington PRESIDENT EISENHOWER makes surprise visit to :press headquarters at his vacation retreat in Au- Ga., today to announce the resignation of :Seeretary of State Wirephoto.) Report Dulles Urgec to Tell Decision -WASHINGTON Secretary of Stat Dulles is reported to have .insisted that President E senhow'er hurry the announcement of his resignatio as the administration's chief foreign policy maker. From his hospital bed, rea zing that he apparently wa ighting a losing battle again cancer, Dulles prevailed o lisenhower to make the an nouncement-today instead of in Dulles ition WASHINGTON A Static-Department spokesman today-said retiring Secretary of State Dulles "had a good night'.'', and there was .no cha'ngelin his physical condi- tion'.slrice Tuesday. "He .will have another X-rayC treatment this after- n o.o State Department Press''Officer Lincoln White added! DULLES WAS visited to- day by his special assistant in the.State Jo- seph N. Greene Jr., and a'per- Phyllis Ber- Dulles, his sonal assistant, rau.' State Department of- ficial dealing- -with German conferred with hirh'before taking off. on a f light ab. Berlin to talk with West officials about cooperative programs cover- ing .libraries and cultural cen- In-response to questions, Whif.e..sai.d Dulles was up and about.this morning. He woulc not discuss' how Dull'e s reached his decision.to resign. 4 Hen, Indian Boy, Jailed in Dope Case PALM SPRINGS (UPI) Four men and a 16-year-olc Indian youth were arrested on charges early today by city, police and Riverside County ..authorities. The; roundup culminated i year, of investigation an'd' al the suspects we're taken U county jail at Riverside. "tear Tears, ke Reveals lis Decision Says Secretary Incapacitated to Aid 'Absolutely1 y MARVIN ARROWSMITH AUGUSTA, Ga. ent Eisenhower, his voici hoked with emotion, toda; adly announced the resigna ion of cancer-stricken Secre-' ary of State Dulles. At a dramatic news confer- ence at his vacation head- I u a r t e r s Eisenhower said Dulles now is "absolutely in- capacitated" to carry on the administrative burden of his office and make policy as well. The President said he has made no final decision on a successor to Dulles. He gave newsmen the impression he might pick someone other nan Undersecretary Chris- ian A. Herter, who has been serving as acting secretary. But the President by no means ruled out Herter. IN WASHINGTON, one top Republican official said it would be wrong to view Ei- senhower's delay in naming a successor as a sign that Her- ter would not get the post. Herter is easily the out- standing candidate, this in- formant said, and is regarded as such by the President. Eisenhower's noncommital answer about .Herter today, his official said, was not meant to alter this but to show the President wanted to wait a- few days, before an- nouncing the choice of Her- A SIMILAR VIEW was heard in Augusta vwhere-, a White-House askeji not to be named, said he still thinks the chances are Eisen- hower will pick" Herter. The aid said Eisenhower undoubtedly feels his an- nouncement of Dulles' resig- his warm tribute to the man who has been his secretary of state since 1953 stand alone for the time being.. Dulles, Eisenhower said, will continue to serve him as a foreign policy consultant. The Finest Evening Neictpaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, APRIL IS, I95t Vol. 62 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-S959 56 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1181 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily} CRASH BURNS 3 TO DEATH next week as planned. Dulles insisted on this, a re- sponsible informant said, be- cause he did not want to make it appear he was hang- ng on-tenaciously to his job despite his illness. Eisenhower reportedly was exceedingly reluctant to an- nounce the news until he was assured anew that.a'medical miracle reviving Dulles' health was impossible. BUT, CONFRONTED with Dulles' virtual.demand, Eisen- hower hastily called, a news conference at Augusta, Ga., and told reporters the man lie regards as a great secre: tary of state is "absolutely incapacitated" to carry on. Dulles has known for-more than a week, informants said, that he. would riot be able to continue in the job he loved so dearly. Eisenhower apparently per- (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) THERE WAS A trace of tears in Eisenhow.er's eyes as he announced the 71-year- old Dulles' decision to step down. Although at the news, con- ference Eisenhower called Dulles "absolutely incapaci- tated" for the administrative >urden and "doing the think- ng for an aid said later that the President had not in- tended to use the word "ab solutely." Dulles Highest, Hoover Asserts NEW YORK- Former President Hoover said today that John Foster. Dulles ranked highest among all secretaries of state and de- scribed his. resignation as a tragedy. "The resignation of Secre- tary John Foster Dulles is the culmination of a great tragedy to the American peo- Hoover said. "We have had many great secretaries of state. History will rank Secretary Dulles among the highest of them in my view the highest of them all." Girl Admits Slaying of 'Human Target" REDWOOD CITY beautiful blonde typist was jailed in a murder investigation today, accused of lumping 18 bullets into the body of a gardener to sat- sfy an urge for a human target. Sheriff Earl Press Secretary James C -lagerty asked newsmen to delete the word, and the of- t (Continued Page A-5, Col. 2) House Probe Ordered on Alford Vote WASHINGTON The House Administration Com mitlee today ordered an in vestigation of the election o: Rep. Dale Alford of Arkansas a Democrat. The investigation, ordered by a, 12-11 vote, will be con ducted headed by by a. subcommittei Rep. Robert T Ashmore It was or dered on motion of Rep Frank Thompson Alford defeated Brook Hays, Democrat, for the House seat from the 5th Arkansas District last November. He was elected in a write-in cam: paign. Alford has been a leading opponent of integration. Hays was a moderate on integra tion. Weather- Considerable cloudi- ness tonight and Thurs- day morning, but mostly sunny Thursday after- noon. Slightly -cooler. Maximum temperature by noon today: .65. 4 Photo bv Bud LjrrtM IREMEN AND VOLUNTEERS attempt to hook cable to flattened auto (left) to drag it away from burning gasoline, tanker, truck' on the Santa Ana Freeway in Anaheim today. Three persons in the auto were .burned, to death and another was burned ly. The truck, south bound, jumped the' freeway divider, knock- ing down fence in foreground. Then it-'> crashed with the cari Russ Jets Truck Leaps Divider Fly Near on Anaheim U.S. Plane B. Whitmore quoted Rosemurie Diane Bjorkland, 18, as saying: "I had a tenible urge 'to kill someone ever since I started target shooting as a hobby 1 wanted a.human target." AUGUST NORRY, 28, a golf course gardener, was found dead in the hills of the Crocker estate, south of San Francisco, on leb I. It was his custom to go there to dump grass cuttings and garden debris. His body had been riddled by 18 bullets. Sheriff Whitmore said Miss Bjorkland related she had met Nprry twice before, as she was shooting at targets, while he emptied his gardening bags. t t t t WHITMORE AGAIN quot- ed the girl: "I used to go up (Continued Page A-5, Col. 6) WHERE TO FIND IT Admiral describes U. S Navy as best in world in field of atomic-power propulsion. Story on Page A-3. Beach B-l. Hal A-23. A-23. D-l to 7. C-4, 5. A-16. Death B-2. A-22. B-3. Shipping C-7. C-l, 2, 3. Tides, TV, D-8. A-23. B-4, 5. Find Girl, 17. Safe; Tells of Kidnaping PONTIAC, Mich. A 17-year-old girl, object of an intensive manhunt after she was reported abducted, wa. found by police today ant told of being a night-Ion prisoner of an ex-convic whose stolen car collidec with her auto. Jo Arm.Vesure of Pontiac told police that the ex-con vict, Harold E. Martin, 20 took her from her damageu car into his stolen car on thi pretext that he wanted ti rush her to a hospital. She sad Martin drove he instead to a wooded subur ban area. The girl said sh was not harmed but wa afraid she might be hurt i she tried to escape. Marti] denied he held her forcibly. Sheriff's deputy Edwain Tessier said Martin was re leased from prison a wee] ago after serving three year for breaking and entering. TESSIER SAID Martin stole an auto in Pontiac Tues day night. -The ill-fated jo; ride was interrupted 'whei Martin's car rammed th Vesure girl's auto. The in tensive hunt ended after 1 hours when a water-board in specter spotted, the stolen ca parked off a lonely road i Bloomfield township at mic morning. He called polic and Martin surrendered with out a struggle. V BERLIN (UPI) Two So fighter planes flew to within 600 feet of a U. S. Air 'orce transport flying the ligh-altitude route to Berlin today but made no attempt to on two previ- ous flights. The high flying American .urbo-prop plane, which the West would use in the event of a new Berlin blockade, was dispatched. to West Berlin rom West Germany despite srevious warnings from the Communists that the Wes must fly the corridors a lower than feet. t A U. S. OFFICIAL said th United States formally npti fied the-Russians in advance by filing a routine flight.plan with the Soviet delegate a the Berlin Air Safety'Cente stating the flight would be made today. The. official said: "The flight was not provocative We merely are asserting ou right to fly to and from Wes Berlin at altitudes of ou choosing." The C130 landed at Wes Berlin's Templehof Airfield safely. THE U.S. OFFICIAL said the two Soviet jets joined th transport shortly after it en tered the space' over Eas German territory. "There was no harassmen or he said. "Th Soviet fighter's maintained distance of about 600 feet They performed no dangerou flight tactics." Lemnitzer in Taipei for Overnight Visit TAIPEI U. S. Arm Vice Chief of Staff Gen. L.'L Lemnitzer arrived today from Korea for an overnight visi persons were burned to death ere.this morning when a tanker- truck leaped the divider of the Santa Ana Freeway, plunged into their 'chicle and enveloped their car in flames. Another occupant of the y, 36, of 392 N. Batavia St., car suffered serious burns. Witnesses said he ran scream- ng from the vehicle, ablaze 'rom head to toe, and then collapsed. Five other persons were in iured in the spectacular col- .ision, which involved five cars in addition to the truck DENSE. BLACK smoke :rom the blazing tanker rose ligh in the sky and could be seen for miles.. The' crash occurred about a.m.. on. the freeway jus' opposite the Broadway Shop- ping Center, between Euclic Ave. and Loara St. Traffic both ways on the freeway had to be blocked off creating a gigantic traffic jam on adjacent streets. The truck driver, Donald L Currell. 27, of 307 Heath Ln. [.ong Beach, was not serious- ly injured. THE CRITICALLY burned man was identified as Eugene B. Megill, 30, of 12351-Blue- bell St., Garden Grove. The three persons burnec (o death .could not be immedi: ately identified. Witnesses said the hero of the accident was Robert Hen derson, 30, of 18196 S. Mesa St., Orange, passenger in of the cars that smashed into the wreckage. Henderson was c r e d i t e with braving a 20-foot "wal of flame" to drag Megil from the area flooded wit! gasoline. Henderson suffered first- sec o n d and third-degree burns on his face and hands The driver of the car in which he was riding, Sterling Ditch Orange, was also burned. OTHERS INJURED were Sheldon Cradduck, 37, of 2263 leliotrope Ave., Corona del Mar, first-degree bums oh the orehead; and William Mal- nor, 28, of 2170 Harbor Blvd., Anaheim. Special hydraulic equip- ment was needed to free the xxlies from the charred auto n which they perished. The xxlies were taken to Hilgen- 'eld Mortuary here. All the injured were taken to Anaheim Memorial Hos- pital. THIS WAS the events in the tragic pile-up: Currell's truck, pulling two. railer tanks loaded-with a total of gallons of gas- oline, was southbound on .the reeway. It hit the rear] 'of a car driven by Adolph KJn- kelear, 41, of 12488 Sproul St. Kinkelear's car splin around but he escaped in- ury.' Kirikelear was arrested on suspicion of misdemeanor manslaughter: The truck bounced through :he dividing island fence, and crashed into the northbound vehicle in which three per- sons perished. THREE OTHER northbound cars were hit by the truck and the gasoline spewing from it. Two of these three cars also caught fire. In one of them were Din Maher, 22, of 426 S. SycMBtre St., Santa .the'-iforer; wid Ken- SfolA, 25, lUt (Continued A-J? f i. c'"   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication