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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: April 13, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 13, 1959, Long Beach, California                             U. S. POISED TO FIRE THREE EARTH SATELLITES TODAY U. Britain Seek Surface H-Test End Would Separate Space Blast Issue From Decision GENEVA United States and Britain asked the Soviet Union today to agree to a prompt controlled sus- pension of' nuclear weapons tests on or near the surface of the earth leaving the problem of other types ol blasts for later negotiations. the propo- sal provided for splitting up the. test suspension problem. It was advanced as Ihe three- power talks resumed after an Easter recess. First Soviet reaction was, reported to be negative. t 3 UNDER THE new. Western plan, agreement would be reached at ,once on banning surface and atomic nuclear ones which cause dangerous radioactive fallout. Such an 'agreement would not cover very high altitude and underground atomic .and hydrogen weapons blasts. Such to police in any be covered in some subsequent agreement reached after the first problem had been solved. U. S. Ambassador James J. Wadsworth and British Min- ister of State David'Ormsby- Gore proposed dividing the nuclear problem into two parts with the idea of getting quick agreement on the types of tests easiest to detect. The ending of such tests also would minimize any health h'azards to the world's popu lation. tf 5 it THE SOURCES pointed out that the United States and Britain would prefer an agree- ment covering the entire range of tests. But the West- ern powers recognized that this conference, which began its deliberations on Oct. 31 now was bogged down on EastWest differences about Controls. .Presumably the limited agreement now suggested as a first step would require less elaborate policing arrange (Continued Page A-3, Col. 4; Crippled Plane With 61 Safe AKRON, Colo. air liner with 61- persons aboar landed on a snow-soft emer gency field here Sunday nigh with only two of its four en gines functioning. Capt. D. L. Boone of Lo Angeles brought down th American Airlines DC smoothly. There were no in juries. The 56 passengers wer taken by bus to Denver, miles west 'of -here. There DC7 ferried in from Chicag picked them up and the trip west] Flight 707 wa on a non-stop journey from Washington, D.C., to Los An geles. THE PILOT SAID a gove nor failed on the No. 2 en gine on the left side of th plane. The engine spewed part which ripped into neighborin No. 1 engine.- Both power plants then failed. started our descen from feet immediat said Capt. Boone. "The was no difficulty in makin landing, although the fie was a little soft." Many residents of this eas ern Colorado farming com m'unity drove to the airfie three miles southeast of he to assist the" passengers, dozen cars bogged down the mud .created by a three day snowstorm. The Finest, Evening Newtpaptr LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, APRIL U, 1W9 32 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 Vol. 60 IELEPHONE HE 5-11CI HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Van Beinum, Philharmonic Leader, Dead Famed Conductor Suffers. Attack at Holland Rehearsal AMSTERDAM n Beinum, 'one 'of the orld's leading symphony nductors, suffered a heart tack and died today during rehearsal with the Amster- m Concertgebouw Orclies- j. Van Beinum was 58 and d conducted the Concert- bouw since 1937. Since 57 he also had been music rector of the Los Angeles ilharmonic. Van Beinum was born anc ucated in Holland and cen red his career on his work ith Dutch musical organ ations. But his tours abroac a guest conductor and with e Concertgebouw and their cordihgs won usical fame. him work HE BROUGHT the Amster am' orchestra "to 'the Uhite< :ates for a1, successful tour 1954. Another was sched ed for 1961. Later this yeai e was to conduct a series o: oncerts with the Los. Angeles ulharmbnic. Van Beinum became ill witl hat was diagnosed as a inor heart disease four Space Shots Due in Calif, and Florida Canaveral Effort WiH.Be'2-iri-l. Vanguard Rocket WASHINGTON United States plans to launch three more earth satellites from Cape Cana- veral, Fla., and one from Van- denberg Air Force Base, Calif. If all goes well, all three man-made moons will be fired skyward by midnight. The new satellites are de- signed to glean more data on the earth's make-up and weather, and explore the possibility of putting .huge reconnaissance satellites into orbit in the future. The Cape Canaveral shot is scheduled to be a unique 2-in-l launching with the Vanguard Rocket. It. will carry an instrumented satel- lite .for measuring the mag- netic field, solar radiation and meteor effects, and a 30-inch inflatable sphere for checking air density, a ACTUALLY, the Canaveral scientists may put three ob- jects in orbit if all goes well. The third and final stage of the rocket assembly is expect- ed to-go into orbit with the AILING DULLES BOARDS PLANE Secretary of State John Foster Dulles looks hag- gard as he boards President's private plane, Colum? bine III, in West Palm Beach, Fla., for flight, back to Washington. Dulles, ill with cancer, returned to Walter Reed AArmy SECRETARY IN HOSPITAL two" satellites. At Vahdenberg, the Air Ike, Dulles Confer, Delay Job Decision WASHINGTON Eisenhower cori- rerred for 45 minutes today'with ailing Secretary of State'Dullies.''They, put as to Dulles' future official role pending obserr SPRING AND WINTER Valerie Stein, 9, comes to rescue: of snow-covered- daffodils inrteTrfront yard in Pittsburgh Sunday.as to five- inches.- of western- Pennsylvania. Late storm'made traffic conditions: HAD FAITH IN FRIENDS EDUARD VAN BEINUM Stricken at Podium veeks ago. His doctors al owed him to resume conduci- ng only last week, and he onducted the first concer ihce his illness in The Hague Saturday. He had been rehearsing the rchestra about 45 mjnutes or a program tonight when IB told the men he needed a ireak and that an assistan :onductor would take over before he could leave the po lium, he slid from the con ductor's seat to the floor anc died, Jetliner Sets New Chicogo-L.A; Mark LOS ANGELES (M TWA Boeing 707 jet airline arrived here Sunday nigh From Chicago in the record breaking time of 3 hours ani 20 minutes. Aboard were 11 passengers. The time eclipsed the ol commercial transport recor set Jan. 9 when the TWA in augural flight made the tri in 3 hours 54 minutes. Weather- Low clouds tonight and early Tuesday, but mostly sunny Tuesday. Noon temperature: 72. Widow Splits Riches Among Many Cronies DOUGLAS, -Ariz. UP) Mrs. Grace was a stern'' mannered woman who put great faith in the the devotion of friends. Although wealthy, she never allowed financial standards to interfere with friendship. SHE WAS fond of Ed Fox, a 76-year-old taxicab driver who 'often provided transportation on her trips around this southern Ari- zona community. She liked Mrs. Ruby Hall, 46-year-old dining room hostess, who dropped by for. a nightly Chief of Police Percy Bowden was her adviser. She called Ernie Beyer, a 69-year-old bank cashier at nearby Bisbee, a close friend; .and the'same for Mrs. Helen Ellis, a Colo-' rado Springs, Colo., widow." Mrs. Mackey, whose late husband founded the famed of Douglas, died last August.at the age of 84. The division of her estate was announced re-- cently. Mrs. Hall ..received a check of Bowden received the same amount. Cabdriver Fox, who's been worried about secur- ity for his "old age, was willed the same as was Beyer and Mrs. Ellis. She divided the rest of her estatCr-which had to- taled after, taxes friends around the nation. LEFT WITHOUT a. dime was Mrs.; Ma'ckey's' only relative Mrs. Evelyn Letts, a niece now living in England. The two women had an argument back in 1945. But after an attorney threatened to contest the will for Mrs. Letts, she was granted from the estate. Iraq Expels 3 U. S. Missionary Couples NEW YORK American Protestant mission- ary couples have been ex- celled from Iraq and''Ire en route to Beirut, Lebanon, the National Council of Churches announced today. A spokesman for the coun- cil identified the ousted mis- sionaries as Mr. and Mrs. Harold Schoup of Zionsville, Pa.; Mr. and Mrs. Harold Da- venport of Seattle, Wash.; and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Weiss of Los Angeles. They had been sent to Iraq by a committee of four Protestant churches working through the The council spokesman sai. the Iraqi government gav missionaries no reaso for the expulsion order.' H said the reason apparentl was.political, rather than re ligious, since there have bee no reports of suppression o Christianity in Iraq. Only seven Protestant mis sionaries now are left i Iraq, the council said. The council, said th S c h o u p s represented th Evangelical and Reforms Churches, the Davenports th United Presbyterian Churcl and the. Weisses the Re United -Missions in Iraq. I formed Church .of America. Force will try to put a Dis- coverer satellite into a south- north polar orbit .This launch 'be part of a" Iphg- range endeavor to develop iatellites capable of scanning the earth with television and photographic cameras. The Discover- er probably will eject a pack- age; of: instruments which scientists will try to recover. However, defense officials were silent on this aspect of the experiment. o T t THE DISCOVERER satel- lites, which are designed to achieve stable flight rather than tumbling about like other, satellites, have an im- portant relationship to even- tual efforts to put a man in (Continued Page A-3, Col. 3) vation and treatment." :No resignation has siibmited, the Whjte House said....' Big Truck Rams Bus, 16 JAMES GLEASON Veteran Actor 76, Dies at Film Home HOLLYWOOD M1) ;ary little Jimmy Gleason, an actor for most of his 76 died Sunday night aft er an illness of almost a year. Gleason was noted for his dour humor and his master 'ul double which took him from the New York stage through more nan two decades of Holly wood films. His first role was being carried, onstage in.a at 2 months of age. His last film role was, as one of Spencer Tracy's politi- cal cronies in "The Last Hur- rah." Many of his films are being shown now on televi sion, including the Joe Pa- looka series, in which he played a prize fight manager. IN ADDITION to acting, Gleason was also a producer and the author of two plays produced in New York. His film roles include "Life of Family of 4 Trapped in Blaze, Killed ASHLAND, Wis. UP) A Bayfield County farmer, his wife and two children died early today when fire leveled their two-story frame home. The victims were Walter Maciejewski, 43, who also worked in an Ashland mill- work plant; his wife, Jean, 33; Walter Jr., 10, and a daughter, Tony Lynn, 5. The Maciejewski farm is located eight miles southwest of here on what is known as Old U. S. Highway 63. The home was a pile of smoking debris by the time'Ashland firemen arrived. .The bodies were found in a first-floor bedroom. Bay- field County Sheriff Ells- worth Embertson said the children apparently awak- ened when the blaze broke out and rushed to their par- ents' room, where the four members of the family were trapped. GARY, Ind. subur- ban bus driver and 16 pas-, sengers were injured, four seriously, when a heavy truck rammed the rear end of. the bus today as it was making a stop east of Gary. The Gary Intercity Lines HIS was loaded with about 30 passengers on a run from Val- aaraiso, Ind., to Gary. Gabriel Oros Jr., 37, of Gary, and most of .his passen- gers suffered minor bruises or whiplash injuries. The truck driver, William G. Clements, 45, Inkster, Mich., was not hurt. He said his brakes failed. Conies Four to Decrtfc in Crash VISALIA (ffi A private plane with apparent engine trouble crashed minutes after taking off from Visalia Air- port Sunday and killed two couples. Victims were Mr. and Mrs. Clinton M. Ernst, owners of the plane and operators of a furniture store, and Mr. and Mrs. W. Gordon Hickman. All lived in Visalia. The plane Three Skiers Missing on Mt. Rainier LONGMIRE, Wash. GW Three Seattle skiers were re- ported today to have been l overnight near the foot elevation on Mt. Rainier. Preston Macy, superinten dent of the Mt. Rainier Na tional Park, said six .rangers searched through the nigh for the missing trio. The three were identified a; Ulla Samvik, Einar Storaker and Bo Ryfeldt. All are ex perienced skiers. Another member of- th skiing party, Ingar Ramsbo o Seattle reported their failure to return late Sunday from a ski trip to Muir Glacier, be tween the and 10.00C foot levels on the peak. Palm Springs Fire Under Control PALM SPRINGS (UPI) Fire fighters brought a brush fire under control late Sunday in rugged terrain five mile south of this desert resort an< near the level p Mt. San Jacinto. Nearly 100 men' from stat the county road crews fough the fire which blackened 14X (Continued Page A-3, Col. 8) plunged into a cotton field. I acres. Eisenhower flew in-from Augusta, Ga., this morning nd drove immediately to Walter Reed Army Hospital o see the secretary. After, White House Press Secretary James C. Hagerty made the following ments: "The President met this his morning at Walter. Reed Hospital with the secretary f state. They of course, dis- ussed the secretary's physi- cal condition. They also dis- ussed 'matters relating to world affairs. "The secretary of state has eturned to Walter Reed for dditional medical observa- ion and treatment. "He is expected to remain at the hospital for some days. "Pending additional medi- cal evaluation there will be no further statement from he President." v DULLES BROKE OFF a re, uperative period in-Florida o return this hos- pital where'-he previously had spent a month and a half un- dergoing radiation 'and other treatment for a recurrent ab- dominal cancer. At the time Dulles went to Florida, there was no indi- cation that-, he would return to the hospital for additional treatment: Hagerty reporters he did not know the 'nature 'of this new treatment, or wheth- er surgery or more radiology; were involved. He' said .those are medical (Continued Page A-3, CoL 1) WHERE TO FIND, IT Former' U. .S. Navy pilot Alan Robert Nye, convicted of a plot to kill Fidel-Castro and ordered out of is home again. See Page A-2.. Beach B-I, Hal A-It A-13. C-4 to 7.' A-4. Death B-2, A-12. B-3. Shipping C-l to 4. A-C. TMes, Temperatures TV, Vital C-4. A-13. Women B-4, Your World Pay A-2.   

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