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Press Telegram: Wednesday, April 8, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 8, 1959, Long Beach, California                             FOOD POISONING FELLS HUNDREDS Union Parley isrupted as ess Hits Some Stricken Aboard Train to Southland't Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8, 1959 Vol. 56 P R1 C B 1 0 C E N T S CLASSIFIED HE HOM EDITING) MPAGES TELEPHONE HE (Six Editions Da SO NEAR AND YET SO FAR It looks like this Army La Crosse missile is about to come in for a landing on the moon, in this striking photo taken at White Sands, N. JvL But actually the moon is still miles distant. The 96-inch focal length lens used by the Army cameraman "pulls in" the Wirephoto.) Vatican Guard Chief Shot by Man He Kicked Out VATICAN CITY commander of the Pope's Swiss Guards, Col Robert Nunlist, was shot and wounded today by a disgruntled former guardsman ex-guardsman, Adolf Rucker, was wounded when the commander sought t< disarm him. i "An ex-Swiss guard fired two pistol shots at the commander of the corps wounding him, but not guards headquarters announced. "The ex-Swiss Oklahoma Votes Out 51-Year Dry Spell llv AiteclaM Oklahomans have kicked.out prohibition, but they will have to wait.at least two months before buying liquor legally. Although.QklahoMans voted it does not becorne effective until the vote is.fqjlcwed..up by the State'Legislature. take from 60 Tto790 days. In other elections Tuesday, Mayor Richard J. Daley 01 Chicago polled a near recor< majority in winning his sec ond term, and Justice E. Har old Hallows won a 'full 10 year term on the Wisconsin Supreme Court in a close non-partisan election. guard ha insisted on being re-enlistee to service .after having beer :pelled last year because-o lileptic symptoms caused b cranial trauma." There were varying ac aunts as to whether the foi er guardsman shot himse r was wounded accidental! a scuffle. COL. NUNUST and h on August, _i___i '__IXu _ _-- Fires Kill I Hurt 4 In.''-Hotels' ly Three hotel in California and one in apolis killed at one person, injured four and rout- ed many others Tuesday'and this morning.1- In Sacramento, fire in the downtown Sonoma Hotel killed three one person and others but left hurt only .minor damage to the second floor of the building. Emma Carter, 37, burned to death after her bedclothing caught fire. She was trapped .in her room at the end of a rear corridor. Edward Washington, 47, an- other tenant, was burned se- verely on the arms, shoulders and face. IN .SAN FRANCISCO, a three-alarm fire drove 25 per- sons from the Oakdale Hotel early today and caused 000 damage. Cause of the blaze was not immediately determined. But Asst'. Fire Chief Carl Kruger said it started in a light well at the rear of the hotel. IN INDIANAPOLIS, fire drove more than 100 guests from their rooms in the Hotel Earle and one man was in- jured critically in a plunge from his window. OKLAHOMA'S action lef Mississippi the. only stat with full prohibition. Wit! all but 13 of precinct reporting, repeal carried 395 242 to Repeal came in the form o a constitutional amendmen allowing sale of packaged liq uor in private stores. Pro hibition has been in the Okla homa Constitution since th state Centered the union 5 years ago. The.Legislature .now mus vitalize the amendment an an anti-whisky law before the legal sale'of pack aged liquor can begin. Besides repealing statewu prohibition, Oklahoman voted down a proposal t ?ive counties option to prohibition in their ow boundaries. This was defea ed to k IN'LOS ANGELES, vote overwhelmingly; rejected (Continued on Pg. A-4, Col. shed lunch "when word cam lat Rucker wanted'-to he colonel. The cbione! we o a Vatican court yard. August Nunlist hots, then a pause and tw more; He ran out' and fpun- is .father ,wrestling wi ;ucker. The son helped su ue the ex-guardsman. The shootings, unpreceden ed in the colorful history of he Swiss Guards, caused tur- moil at the Vatican. AT there was tight (Continued Page A-4, Col. WASHINGTON WV-Hun- dreds of delegates to the AFL-CIO unemployment con- ference here were stricken with food poisoning, some en ute Tuesday night and oth- s in the meeting hall today. At least 30 were hurried hospitals from the Nation- Guard Armory where the eeting was held, and one an was reported in serious indition. The first report came from e Ohio delegation. A union ficial from Lima estimated lat about half the 600-man roup aboard a Toledo-Wash igton train became ill Tues- ay night after eating turkey r dinner in a dining car on Toledo-Washington train. THEN THE illness struck i the convention hall, itself. Later, Dr. James Shea, ad- mitting officer at the District f Columbia General Hos- ital, said 30 cases admitted lere were diagnosed as acute ood poisoning. He said al 'ere in satisfactory condi on. D. C. General is next to he armory. Dr. Frederick C. Heath, leputy director of the dis- rict's public health service, said health service techni- ians had begun analyzing amples of food and water sed on the overnight Balti- more Ohio train. Of those sent to the hos- rital 18 were reported still leld for observation or treat- ment this afternoon. A Red Cross first aid corps men said doctors left a gal Ion of paregoric at the ar mory. to treat of per sons' not ill-enough for hos- pitalizalion. In a'rbaserrierit room there, a score of wom- en were stretch out on cots, some covered with coats or blankets.. March on Co to Demand Jobless Macomb County, Mich., arrives at unemployment rally in Washington, carrying ef asking federal works Wirephoto.) Ike Policies L MAN IN A RED CROSS official said he would guess that 75 or 100 persons were reported ill at the armory, mostly with stomach cramps, nausea and iarrhea. The. official dss at Demolition GIs lin 'Riskiest Job1 FOR DAY, MIGHT Lover's Lant Game Has Its Rules, foe ANDERSON, .'ind.' Robert Vf-'. (Screamin1) Beeman doesn't object to the use of his gravel-pit driveway as a lover's lane, but has decided to set some ground rules. Beeman ran' 'an1 adver- tisement in the Anderson Bulletin Tuesday setting these rules at the pit in the White River bottoms: "Participants park on the right, left. spectators.'.: on the "During daylight hours, please; cover windows, as we have had several- near, collisions" because of truck drivers not watching ned eight ambulances and got two doctors and eight or nine nurses from the District of Columbia Health Department. Ralph Sliadley, an executive' member of Local 724, International Union of Elec- trical Workers, Lima, said the Ohio'delegation "was in a real mess." "It hit some of us about fwo hours after Shadley said, "hut it began to get really serious about 2 in the morning." Famed Italian Pilot Lands Plane, Dies ROME Mario de once holder of the world's speed record for air- planes, died today after land- ing his plane on a Rome air- field'. I De Bardi, pilot si nee World War 1, was 65. He had; taken up his small plane and was doing acrobatics when] he apparently suffered an at tack. WASHINGTON-1 Thousands of'AFL'CIO. union- ists staged a march on Wash- ington today for a militant mass rally 'demanding gov- ernment action to reduce unemployment. Delegations from 15 east- ern and midwestern cities arrived throughout the morn- ng. by special trains, buses and auto caravans. They bore tanners and placards urging Congress and the Eisenhower administration to act on the obless situation. Some of the jlacards chided President iisenhower for playing golf. AFL-CIO President. George Meany set the tone for the mammoth rally in an opening speech here which assailjed the President's economic pol- ies. HE CHARGED that the President's policies wouk prolong high-level unemploy ment and eventually lead to disaster. He'called for highei (Continued on Pg. A-4, Col. 5 J. S. Ship to Russ JUNEAU, Alaska (UP1) he 230-foot Coast Guard utter Storis today was an- lored at Akun Bay in the leutians awaiting a rendez- ous with a Russian tug to ye aid to an injured and un onscious Russian seaman. The tug VBditelnyj" was due Then, they plan to pour alco VOTES DISPEL TOWN'S BIG JOKE 1 HOUR'BINGE' S.F. Students Go AN Out en Fads SAN FRANCISCO Sin Francisco State College itudents, hoping to put an end to such shenanigans, went on a one-hour to- getherness binge Tuesday. The results: Eighteen students piled atop a two-wheel motor scooter; 29 oozed into a bathtub; 61 girls drank from the same milkshake container at the same time straws. Oh yes the telephone booth. A bunch tangled themselves inside, but no- body bothered to count 'em. Men Out of Office FULTON, Kan. men of Fulton thought the Ladies Citizens ticket was the funniest joke in until Tuesday. That's when women won control of the town govern- ment.. THE VOTERS turned out record numbers (total vote: 88) and elected 72-year-old Mabel Austin mayor. Three other Ladies Citizens' can- didates were elected to the five-member City Council. "They (the men) were and kidding us about it when we first started talking about running for Miss Austin said Tuesday night. "We just wanted to show the men we could do it." Miss Austin, a retired employe of' the U. S. In- ternal Revenue Service, de- feated Mayor Howard Post, a grocer, 46 .votes, to. 351 Elected to the Council were Mrs. Margaret-Delano, who admits to being older than 70; Mrs. Esther Wat- son, 65; and Mrs. Lois Erie, 40. Incumbent C o u n c ilrinan Bowen Ballah withstood the feminine challenge, and the fifth Council seat also will be held by a man. Just who it will be isn't known yet. John. Clay ton and Arthur Johnson tied for the job with 36 votes, and the city mothers havon't decided how to resolve the issue. The record total vote ap- parently contributed to' the ladies' victory. "We had an unusually good City Clerk Howard Coleman said. "We haven't had this many voters out in history." Fulton is 85 miles south of Kansas City on U. S. Highway 69. It has a pop- ulation of 231; MISS AUSTIN said she and her colleagues have "several things we'd like to do." "We'd like to try to do something about getting people to keep their dogs out of other yards and she said. "Some people have said this town is going to the dogs. "We like to think it went to the women." Fierce Bands of Tibetans Plague Reds NEW DELHI Chinese Communists havi u'shed troops, guns and auto matic weapons into the rebel Sous areas of Tibet hu ierce Khampa tribesmen ar 'giving them hell" in wil guerrilla fighting, it was re wrted here today. Reliable sources in Delhi said the Chinese als  of dynamite to a safe spot where it will be explodec o arrive late this morning at hich time the injured man as to be placed aboard the toris. He was then to be aken to Cold Bay, 150 miles ast and transported to an Anchorage hospital by Coast uard plane. Coast Guard officials, said ere the tug took the seaman, elieved to be suffering from rain injury, off the Russian efrigerator ship Pischavaya ndiistriya early today in the Bering Sea north of Akvm ay. Akun Bay is on the west ide of the Unimak Pass. RADIO CONTACT was made with _the refrigerator Continued on Pg. A-4, Col. hoi over the nitroglycerin to neutralize it and burn th sback. Aiding Capt. Eberhardt i the job will be Sgts. Elme R. Conder of Long_ Beach Calif., Kenton E.. Kohr o F red e ri ck sburg. Pa., an Bruce H. Johnson of Lehigl Iowa. Weather-- C o n s i derable cloudi- ness tonight and early Thursday, but mostly sunny Thursday fior n CAPE 't w'o-s'i a ocket. hurled its ental nose -cone TTijtfj own the Atlantic 'trZcktoif, ange early today and into he hands of a waiting overy team. It was ecoyery of a t intercontinental In i Defense .Department aterhent released here''-b'y he Air Force, le futuristic, nose trieved from the antic near Ascension ttle more than two hours fter the Thor-Able _rocSet ilasted off from :veral. THE THOR-ABLE -rocket bearing i the experi- mental nose cone was fir :35 a. m. The PentagoruswiJ airplanes and saw the cone blick o ward earth soon "At a., one. aircrjift sighted the .dye mark'erU'Wi- leased from the recovery package tored (guided) the shigi-rtq that the statemjjit said. "The nose c then picked, up. by range vessel." It was the first cone that has been seven firings of that on nose cone experiments, >VHERE TO FIND IT 'With Assembly passage of [is- fax program, Gov. Jrown's legislative requests have begun to roll through the Legislature in high gear. See Pag% A-5. Alger Hiss Europe Tour f. Hiss, ment Beach B-l. Hal A-23. A-23. C-5 to 11. B-10, II. A-lfl. Death B-2. A-22. B-3. Shipping A-U. Pages C-l to 5. B-8. Tides, TV, C-I2. A-23. B-4, S. Your A-2. WASHINGTON Alger former official State Depart- convicted of perjury in a case involving charges of spying for Russia.j will be granted a passport for travel abroad, the State De- partment announced today. State Department press of- ficer Lincoln White said in response to an inquiry that Hiss filed application "and we have decided to grant the passport." "He had applied for trave! to England, France, Holland, and possibly other Western European said. White WHITE DECLINED to get drawn into a discussion as to whether Hiss could Soviet Union. The will permit travel an except to countries China with which does-not have forma Asked why the departoftftt decided to. issue the White said that in the of legislative authority thit de- partment "had no authorify'ip refuse'the passport." Hiss has been in New York since his from prison .in 1954 after fenr- ing nearly four perjury. The.perjury based on his sworn denial had passed secret govertawat to a eourwc Soviet ipy   

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