Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Press Telegram: Monday, April 6, 1959 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 6, 1959, Long Beach, California                             L A. OFFICER, 2 DRUNKEN THUGS SLAIN The Southland's fiikest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, APRIL 6, I95i Vol. LXXIt-No. 54 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 38 PAGES HOME EDITION Fifty-Cent ENGINEER GLENNON Nan Glennon, 34, and a is anlengineer in the Space Technology Inglewood. She feli into engineering by accident when she en- rolled in a mechanics class at the University of Southern California. It turned out to be a special course in physics for engineers. She decided then she wanted to be an engineer. In'1944 she was graduated with the first degree of bachelor of engi- neering ever awarded a woman by Charge Russ, Not U. S., Damaging Berlin Talk Hope WASHINGTON United States today re- jected as "groundless" a Soviet charge of violation of Berlin corridor air space. It said Russian actions, not American, may be dimming prospects for agreement at the forthcoming Geneva conference on Germany. :State Department Press Of- Ike Hears Gratifying Jobs Data Court Rejects Bid by Chessman High Tribunal Denies Filing of Habeas Corpus Writ WASHINGTON OB The Supreme Court today refused to order release on a habeas corpus proceeding for convict- author Caryl Chessman, who has made a long: fight to evade execution in California The high tribunal in .'a brief order denied Chessman the right to file a petition asking issuance of a writ of habeas corpus. The no reason for the denial. It rioted tha Chief Justice Warren, former governor of California, tool no part in consideration o the case. .-.WASHINGTON de'nt E'senhower hinted today that unemployment in the month ending March 15 showed A gratifying decline The hint came after Eisen hower had conferred for aboui 35 minutes at the Whiti House with Secretary o La'bdr Mitchell. Press Secretary James C Hagerty volunteered at a news conference that th President (Tailed Mitchell in to gel a report on the govern ment's latest figures on job lessness. The statistics will be mad public Tuesday by the Labo and Commerce Department HAGERTY, after talkin with Eisenhower, said th President believes that th figures for the month esidin in mid-March "will be grat fying and of great interest t all Americans." Asked whether that mean that the government will re port an improvement in th reduction of unemploymen Hagerty replied only that th rtew statistics are "prett good." THE LAST OFFICIAL go' ernment count of the unem ployment was to February. This' was an in crease of over January There is a normal declin of unemployemnt betwee February and March in th neighborhood of t Experts have predicting this sort of declin is to be expected again th spring, as" warmer weather i creases job prospects in ou dobi- work: list Shot, Killed by Police -LOS ANGELES m torcyclist was shot and kille by-police during an 80-mil an-hour chase on the Harlx Freeway. -Officers said they fin Sunday at Ledrew Keith Pe darvis, 44, after he forced tw persons on another moto cycle off the freeway. T chaise began when police spo ted Pendarvis speeding. cer. Lincoln White expressed IB U. S.' view amid a new urry of exchanges between he United'States and the So- et Union over air flights. In a move a ..S. effort to show the error f Russian claims .that the Jnited States has been pro- oking East-West tensions, State Department made ublic a note sent to Mos- ow March 25. This to So- iet fighter attacks or passes t American aircraft last No- ember, rejected 'a Moscow ontention that U. S. planes hould stay 'clear of airspace ie other country does not vant it to use. THE NOTE. claimed the S. planes Involved .were more than 60 miles from the earest Soviet territory. The Soviet government.'the U. S. note said, was trying to urn attention away from the acts of its own planes in in- ernation'al airspace by charg- ng "violations" of Soviet air pace. This hardly helps re- ations between Washington Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) Chessman was convicted o attempted rape and kidnaping in a California state court in 1948. In prolonged litigatioi since, he has evaded six date with the California gas cham ber. r' CHESSMAN WAS know: as "The Red: Light Bandit who prowled Covers lanes i the Los Angeles area, posin as a policeman. In o t he r decisions, th court: (1) Ruled unanimously tha two firms engaged in minin coal from property owned b others: are not entitled to d pletion allowances wheh 'fij urihg federal income taxes. (2) Dismissed an appeal b two women who had triet unsuccessfully in lower court to force Texas Colieg to admit them as students. (3) Ruled unanimously tha a retailer seeking' damage from a competitor under th antitrust laws is not to show, that the public is in jured by the competitor policies. Bomb Explodes in Russ Embassy Syria (fft The local press said today time bomb exploded insic the Soviet Embassy buildin in BagTidad Sunday but the were no casualties. The dai Al Wahda said the bom went off first floor. in 3 Deaths Ambulance Men Crawl Under Fire to Save Policeman SlaFf Photo bv Bob LONG BEACH POLICE CAR AFTER COLLISION AT WILLOW ST. AND CHERRY AVE. 700 Star on Oscar TV By JAMES VJBA'CQN HOLLYWOOD.. Reynolds Von't- be there to face Eddie Fisher and Eliza- beth, but-Holly wood may stii have to find a better adjective than colossal, to properly, de- scribe tonight's big Academy Awards show. A two-hour telecast, with out commercials, will begin at over NBC-TV. At the end more than 100 of the biggest-names fin 'moviedom will .have been seen .by. :the viewers.. .They range all the way from Millie Perkins; Holly- wood's newest, star; .to Ingrit Bergman, making a senti mental return to her first in 10 a FOR A WHILE it looked ;as if Hollywood's most famous triangle might give .the shov, a backstage'suspense that no (Continued Page A-6, Col. 2 3 Injured as Police Hit Car in Chase A police car and another auto crashed at an inter- ection here early today as an indirect aftermath of a ight outside a bar. The driver of the car, Earie Richard Chilcote, 25, of 2312 Marwick Ave., was.seriously ini ured. Community Hospital physicians reported had deep cut on his left shoulder muscle. Ghilcote was not involved n the bar brawl. The driver of the police car, fficer Vern Owings, suffered a badly cut lip requiring close the wound, lis partner, officer John Thomas :had a cut cheek and ibtasions of the knees, neck ind ribs. The accident occurred at Willow St. and Cherry Ave. while the police were pur- suing, a car driven by-Edgar Dee Jones, 20, of 5350 Ocana of-Lakewood. LEGION BAND SERENADES 'UNCLE WALT' Walter Williams, 116, of Houston, Tex., last surviving veteran of the Civil War, chomps on a cigar as he listens to an American Legion band serenade him with favorite songs and marches of his youth. The old to thousands as "Uncle bedridden. Story on Page Photo.) Report K Fainted in East Zone BONN, Germany lamburg newspaper's report JONES, WHO quently stopped. was subse- by another >olice car at Spring St. and Temple Ave., was booked for nvestigatibn of assault with a deadly weapon, reckless driving, trying to evade arrest and burglary. Passenger Buddy Dickson Sturgeon, 28, of 15555% Jlaine Ave., Bellflower, was also booked on the assault and burglary counts. A .sec- ond passenger, Miss Theolyn R. Kennedy, 21, of the Bell 'lower address, was bookec !or investigation of burglary Their arrest was triggered by a fight in the parking lot of the Past Time i. Anaheim St. 2441 WITNESSES SAID .the two men beat and kicked Navy sailor Joseph G. 37 Officers R. E. Lippard anc f. J. Hurlbirt had put the in ured man in the back of their wtrol car and were about to ake him to Seaside. Hospital when Jones drove by. The policemen went in pur- suit, at the same time alert- ng other units via the radio JONES, THE officers at- tested, hit speeds of 85 miles >er hour. He didn't have his lights on. Jones outdistanced Lipparc and Hurlbirt but the pursuit was taken up by Officers Ow ing and Thomas, who spottec the car on Cherry Ave. The arrest was made by Officers G.P.'LaRue and J. R Higgins, who joined the chas after the crash. Cutting torches and saw were found in Jones' car hat Soviet (hrushchev 34 Escape Prison, 28 Zaptured JESS UPS, Md. Ireds of state police, national guardsmen, county police .am Marines captured more fugi ives today from a mass prison, break at the Patuxen'i nstitution. Thirty-four young inmates overpowered guards anc jroke out of the institution 'or defective delinquents Sun day night. Only six were still at larg today. Four of the latest ar rested were picked up in Bal timore City when a passer-b; saw them changing from prls on garb to civilian clothes i a.parked'station'wagon thej had stolen. State Police Lt. W. W. Cor in said two airplanes flyin, :ow over the area accounts for the capture of six prison ers early today.. "THE PLANES found fou of them, hidden under th he said. "A short tim ater they located two more going.into the woods." Inmates made their break about 7 p.m. Sunday by seiz- ing keys from two unarmed ;uards and unlocked six doors Between them and freedom. State Supt. of Prisons James W. Curran said it was the largest break in the history of Maryland prisons. LOS ANGELES CW-r-A po- iceman and two drunken ban- dits were killed in a. gun bat- tle Sunday night during a 50- cent robbery of a supermarket Two heroic .ambulance at- tendants crawled under gun- fire to bring the fatally wounded officer out of the market. Those killed: Officer Charles E. 40, of the University Division, Howard G. Grant, an ex -convict who shot Bogardus. Napoleon Banks, 37, a bar- ber with a criminal record dating to 1945. f THE GUNMEN entered the store at 1451 W. Washington Blvd. just before the 11 p.m. closing time. They 'pistol- whipped assistant manager Louis Palos when he told them he couldn't open the safe. They took 50 cents from clerk Ted Jordan. Officers Bogardus and Nor; man A. Comeau entered the store in response to a silent burglar alarm. Bogardus was shot in the head as he went up stairs to the loft. As Bogardus tumbled down the stairs, a plainsclothes of- ficer, C. A. Calvert, arrived and engaged Grant in a gun duel and killed him. Officer L. F. Tucker spotted 3anks aiming a gun from be- lind a pile of. cans. Tucker killed him. DURING THE battle, am- Premier recently Nikita had a ainting spell ties in with the inderstanding in Moscow hat he has been told by his doctors to cut down on his consumption .of alcohol. The Hamburg newspaper 3ild Zeitung carried the story of the fainting spell, .which it said was not caused by a leart ailment. Sources for the story were said to be diplomats in Hel iinki. When Khrushchev visited ?-ast Germany last month, hej appeared generally to be fol- owing doctors' orders on his alcohol intake. c BUT THE night March 10, during a reception attended by 800 people in the Soviet .Embassy in East Ber- lin, Khrushchev "fell off the wagon." Khrushchev may have had a fainting spell that night, according to a report from Hans Elbrich Kempski -of Munich's Sueddeutsche Zei- tung, who said he was pres ent when the Soviet premier "suffered a loss of strength." julancemen Don Gardner and George Antonelli removed Bo- ;ardus on a stretcher. He died n a hospital. Clerk Jordan told officers: "Both men were drunk and they were mean. When I showed them the sign on the safe explaining that it could only be opened by a'time lock they didn't-seem to under- stand. "They made us lie down on the floor, kicked us, punched us and-jabbed us with their guns." Southland Fire Peril Comes Early LOS ANGELES (UPI) Drought conditions may force curtailment of many activities in forest areas of Southern California earlier than usual this year unless substantial rainfall occurs this month, it was predicted today. Don K. Porter, fire pre- vention officer for Angeles National Forest, said dry wind and lack of rain al- ready have brought tanker units and fire-fighting crews into action .six weeks ahead of the normal time. Weather- Cons iderable cloudi- ness tonight Decreasing cloudiness. Tuesday. WHERE TO FIND IT Mobilgas Economy Run en- tries completed the first leg of their trip from Los Angeles to Cedar City, Utah, Sunday, See Page A-3. Beach B-l Hal A-17 A-17 C-5 to 9 B-6, 7 Death B-2. A-I6 B-3. Shipping A-10 C-l, 2j 3, 4 A-I4 Tides, TV, C-1B Vital A-li A-17 B-4, 5 Your A-2 EGGHEADS TOO SMART 'Hardheads Dumb, Thus Best Leaders SOMERVILLE, N. J. says a top advertising executive, "are producing more leaders than the eggheads." To back up this assertion, Charles H. Brower of West- field notes that President Eisenhower was 61st in his class at West Point, former President Truman never went to college, and former President Hoover was never known to have received a single in college. Brower, president of Batten, Barton, Durstine and Os- born, told the 1959 Rutgers University all-alumni din- ner that he didn't think any world leader had been a quiz kid. "LOOKING AT IT another he said, "why should we spend all of our money educating youngsters who are so bright that they know there is no God, that life is just 60 or 70 years of idiocy, that love is a mere biological mess, that patriotism is corny and thai altogether really just too futile to try? "I'd rather put my money into educating a few men and women' who are too dumb to know that they are al- ready licked before they start." is a graduate of Rutgers.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication