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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: March 16, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - March 16, 1959, Long Beach, California                             L B. MOTHER AMONG S CRASH DEAD Two Babies Also Victims on U.S.66 Crowbars Used to Take Bodies From Wreckage A Long Beach mother and two children were among eight .persons killed Sunday night in a headon auto crash near Kingman, Ariz. The Long Beach victims were identified by "Arizona Highway Patrol officers as Gertrude'Chavez, .24, of 1326 Lime Ave., her infant son, Richard, and Josie Campbell, 2. Home address of the Campbell child was not known. Officers said a cat driven by Joe Williams, 32, of Peadh Springs, Ariz., strayed over the center line of U. S. 66 and rammed into an oncoming car driven by Henry Manuel Goke, 38, of Albuquerque. MRS. CHAVEZ and the two children were passengers in Goke's auto. So violent was the crash that crowbars had to be used to remove bodies from the wreckage. Also killed in the crash were Goke, Williams am three passengers in Williams car John Collins, 32, Hattie Williams and- Mary Collins all of Peach Springs a com munity on the Hualapai In dian reservation. Four other persons were in- jured in the crash..None was from Long Beach. Sailing, 112, Dies; Civil War Vets Roll Cut to One HOME The Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, MARCH 16, 1959 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 30 PAGES Vol. 36 EDITION (Six Editions Daily] TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 JOHN SALLING, the 112-year-old Confederate soldier who died today, is.pictured at his home in Slant, Va., in 1958. He succumbed to pneumonia. Ike Gives TV Talk on Berlin Tonight, Expected to Detail U. S. Stand, Charges Russ Breaking Pact WASHINGTON e n t Eisenhower dropped practically all other business oday to give full attention to >reparing his address lo the nation on the Berlin crisis. Eisenhower had no appoint ment except a brief meeting with the new ambas sador from Cuba, Dr. Ernesto Dihigo. White House Press Secre lary James C. Hagerty said the President was spending the rest of the day working with his chief speech writer, Heat Prevails but Rain May End It Dry desert winds continued to move down over the moun tains today, prolonging a weekend heat wave that brought large crowds to the beaches. But there's a chance of cooling rain near the end of T Charges isser Tries to Grab Iraq BEIRUT, Lebanon Soviet Premier Nikita Khrush chev accused United Arab Re public President Gamal-Abde charge was made the week, added. the weatherman The warm winds gave Long Beach a high temperature of 85 Sunday. Clear skies and Agency. Nasser today of trying- to an nex Iraq into the U.A.R. adding fuel to a new Mideas crisis. The Moscow at a celebratioi marking the signing of a new Soviet-Iraqi technical a i agreement. re marks were broadcast by th official' Soviet Tass New above-normal temperatures are in sight for the next few days, giving way.to the pos- sibility of showers on Thurs- day or Friday, the Weather with -violent anti-Iraqi dem They came at a time whe the steadily deteriorating rek tions between the N.A.R. an Iraq hit a dangerous new lo Bureau reported. The winds hit a peak .of 45 miles per hour in nearby des ert areas, slowing traffic and stripping the paint from hun- dreds of autos. Marlon Brando Sued for Divorce SANTA MONICA Actress Anna Kashfi sued actor Marlon Brando for divorce today. She charged without elaborating, that he caused her "grievous mental suffering, distress and in-, jury." The suit said the couple separated last. Sept. 25. Brando is at work directing and starring in a movie, "One- eyed at Paramount Studio in Hollywood. onstrations in Cairo. The U.A.R. war minist told a crowd of shou ng demonstrators there toda that the people of his cou try "are ready to sacrifii their blood for the .sake .he Iraqi people." EARLIER, the Cairo new paper Al Ahram report trom Damascus that Ira authorities had ordered U.A.R. citizens to get out of that country within 24 hours. In his Moscow speech, Khrushchev was quoted as saying that "President Nasser K1NGSPORT, Tenn. UPI he rollof Civil War Veter- 15'was cut in half today ith the death of 112-year d John Sailing, a Confed- ate soldier from nearby lant, Va. The rebel veteran, stricken y pneumonia last week, was rought to a Kingsport clinic hursday. But doctors said e was too old to fight off is last illness. Sailings-death.leaves only ne other known survivor pi ic war which disrupted the ation almost a century ago He is Walter Williams of Houston, Tex., also a Con- ederate veteran, now past 16 years of age. He has been ed-ridden for several months. The Virginian retained his mental faculties until his last The President's .talk Is scheduled for direct view- ing on Channel 2 at p.m.; channel. 7 at p.m. and channel U at p.m. KNX-radio also will carry the speech direct from the White House at HE'S A DEAR FRIEND Hungry deer of. the Adirondack find a sympathizer in Dr. Robert Smith, of Booneville, N; Y., member of the Adirondack League Club. His group is feed- ing nearly 100 deer a day while deep snow covers Dr. Malcolm Moos, and other staff members on tonight's TV'and radio address. Eisenhower discussed the nature of the talk with Secre- tary of State Dulles last Fri- day at Walter Reed Army hospital, where the secretary is undergoing -'treatment for a recurrence of cancer. t HIS HALF-HOUR address w i 11 be carried by all the major radio networks. Advance indications wen would detai llness about and enjoyed talking his boyhood experi- TrialOpens in Love Shooting INDIANAPOLIS nie Nicholas, pale and tearful, went on trial before an over- low crowd of spectators to- day for the slaying of a wealthy drug executive who fe jilted her for a younger ences. He was only 16 when he-enlisted in the Virginia 'orces opposing the Yankees. SCORES OF descendants jiirvive the old soldier, whose wife died nearly 20 years ago. Military services are Duncan Case Goes to Jury in Ventura VENTURA Elizabeth Duncan murder case went to the jury today on the 20th day of the sensational JriaL.The..jury of eight women and four men'received the case at a. m. and immediately retired to begin deliberations on the fate of 54-year-old Mrs. Duncan charged with hiring two men. to kill her is insisting on the unification of the Iraqi republic with the He added that the question of unification "must be de- (Contimied on Pg. Col.' 4) STOPS THEFT TRY Bf 3 Quii100-Yr.-OldMan in Shooting of Teener planned for a.m. Thurs- jay at the National Guard armory in Gate Va. Graveside will fol low at the nearby family cemetery at Slant. The body will lie in state. at.vthe armory from 9 a.m. Tuesday until Thursday and will be buried in a Confeder- .te uniform. At his bedside when the id came were Mrs. H. A. :cCamey, a daughter; Hobert awkins, a vgrandson, and iss Linda Hawkins, greal- randdaughter, all of Bristol, a. SALI.ING'S condition _had steadily since he >as admitted to the hospital nd he had been receiving onstant'supply of oxygen. Sailing would have been 13 on .May 15. Sailing liked to see people nd talk with them and was Continued on Pg. A-4, Col. 6) his charges that the Russians in seeking to force Alliec military forces out of the one time German capital, are try ng to break solemn agree ments entered into during and after'World War. II concern- ing the four-power status of the city: He may emphasize this by (Continued on Pg. A-4, Col. 1) DALLAS ar- rested a 100-year-old' man today after an youth was shot. The shooting took place about 1 a. m. at the Negro centenarian's three-room "house. Sheriff's deputies 0. H. McDonald and R. P. Garvin said the shooting apparent- ly climaxed a robbery at- tempt by three white men and a Negro. The aged mar. said the fSur.men parked in front of his shanty about midnight. "1 went to bed he said. About 1 a. m., he said, he was awakened by a flash- light beam in his face. He said .he grabbed an old rifle and yelled, "I'll jusi kilt' you." He fired the weapon one time through the front door. "I heard someone he said, and slipped out the back -door and went to a neighbor's. "When we got there, we found the flashlight still burning about 10 feet from the McDonald said. "We also found a toy pistol." The four later were ar rested at Parkland Hospi- tal, where they had taken the 18-year-old youth. -The youth, -under guard later in the day, was shot in the right shoulder. Attendants said his condition was good. No' charges were filed. r WHERE TO FIND IT Fierce winter's end storms oared through the Midwes fito the East today with un diminished fury. See Page A-3 Beach B-l. C-5 to 9. B-6, 7. A-9. Death B-2. A-8. B-3. Hal A-9. Shipping C-5, Sports-rPages C-l, 2, 3, 4. A-4. Tides, TV, C-IB. Vital C-5. A-f. B-4, 5. Your. A-2. Weather- Clear tonight and sunny Tuesday. Con- inued warm, inued warm. Maximum :empcrature by noon to- day: 85. The graying divorcee 'ar- rived with a jail matron a quarter-hour before the trial opened, dabbing her eyes. She said she had slept only three hours since Friday and reported she was fcc-'.ing r.srv- ous but optimistic." SHE WORE 'a neat gray suit. Both her hands were in harnesses because of paral ysis she has suffered since her near-suicide after the shooting. All the 60 public seats in the little, dingy courtroom were filled, and curious spec- tators milled outside in.the basement corridor in the on Pg. A-4, Col. 3) CONNIE NICHOLAS, accused of slaying a drug ex- ecutive who jilted her, sits alone as prosecution and defense attorneys confer with judge at star' of her trial in Wirephoto.) Boy to Be for Heroism WASHINGTON ighteen-year-old William Jo >ph Steury of Blufftdn, Ind. as been selected to receive B Young .American Meda T bravery for 1957, Atty en. Rogers announced today Young Steury and his par nts, Mr. and Mrs. Amos teury, will be brought to 'ashington soon for a three ay visit during which tim resident Eisenhower w i 1 resent the medal at the Vhite House. The medal is for the rescue f the Rev. Wayne Piety from rowning at the risk of Steu- y's own life on Feb. 21, 1957. Piety, 62, had gone to r o z e n Kunkel Lake near luffton to fish through the e. The ice broke and plunged im imp the water. daughter-in-law. The jurors had heard hal an hour of instructions on the aw and evidence from Su jerior Judge Charles F. Blackstock. The judge told them: "If Mrs. Duncan encour- aged and advised Augustine Baldonado and Luis Moya to kill Olga Duncan, she is equally guilty with them whether she was presept or Fires Claim 40 Lives in Two Days Most of Victims Are Children in Rash of Blazes By Press A rash of fires, striking mostly in small homes or apartments, took more than 40 lives across the country, Sunday and today. Most of the victims w..vs children. In Oklahoma and Texas, range fires whipped by high winds scourged more than acres. One fire-fighter was killed. In Superior, Wis., a father and his five small children died when flames swept their duplex home. In rural Buckingham, Va., fire broke out in a small log cabin and five persons died, three of them children. THREE CHILDREN died In Halfway, Ore., when theyl ap- parently tried to escape a fire by running into a closet; in their home. Authorities said they probably started the blaze by' playing with matches. Their parents were away. The highest toll was'in Cross Hill, S. C., Sunday, where a blaze believed started >y a wood stove took the ives of a sharecropper, eight of his and two other youngsters who were visiting. In North Philadelphia, Pa., Sunday, eight children in one family died when flames swept their home. The par- ents and two other children. The. prosecution charged that Mrs. Duncan, violently jealous of Olga, shopped around for a killer. Olga and the defendant's son Frank, 30-year-old Santa Barbara at torney, were married last STEURY, THEN 17, saw iety's plight from the shore1 nd crawled several times cross the ice trying to get im out, first with a tree mb and then with a rope. He managed to get one end if the rope tied around Piety's houlder and backed away, nly to feel the ice buckle mder him. Unable to pull the man out because of the break- ng ice, Bill held on to the rope for 30 minutes until an ndiana state, trooper arrived and joined them on the ice Together, they supportec the fisherman for another 50 mintites until a fire depart- me.nt squad arrived, launchec a boat, and brought all three men to shore. Steury now is a studen at the University of New Mexico. Baldonado, 26, and Moya, 20, testified that Mrs. Dun- can offered them to kill her son's pregnant wife. They said they kidnaped her from her' Santa Barbara apartment Nov. 17, strangled her and buried her body in a shallow grave beside a coun- try road. MRS. DUNCAN, wearing a bright blue dress, was ani- mated and serene as she sat Find 2 Bodies in Car Buried Under Snow CRESTON, Iowa They were Floyd Gates, escaped. Three persons died of smoke poisoning in an apart- ment fire in West New York, N. Y., the same day. SMALL FIRES in homes in Ticonderoga, N. Y., and High- land Mills, N. Y., took two men's lives. In central Oklahoma, a young woman and her 3-year- old daughter died of burns suffered when their rural home burned to the ground. In the same state, a 41-year- old man was fatally burned- when his clothing caught fire at his home near Grove. -A snowplow., today uncovered the bodies of two men inside a car which was buried under a huge snowdrift on a coun- try road near here. identified, as 43, AnA his brother, Welby, 57, both of Creston. They apparently had been trapped in W Irisk Chief Arrives for Visit With fee NEW YORK (UPI) President Sean T. O'Kelly ar rives here today for a 15-da goodwill visit that include St. Patrick's Day with Presi dent Eisenhower at the Whit House. their Qf a n the courtroom before the Continued on Pg. A-4, Col. snowstorm last Saturday. SMALL CITY' IN SPACE Powerful Rocket Development Near ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. prominent chem- ical engineer said Sunday a rocket engine will be de- veloped in the "foreseeable future" which could place a satellite resembling .a "small city" in orbit. Thomas Dixon, chief en- gineer of Rocketdyne, a liquid fuel manufacturing firm of Canoga Park, Calif., said the rocket engine could develop a thrust of five million pounds which could put a pound manned satellite into space. He told the opening ses- sion of the 39th annual convention of the American Institute of Chemical En- gineers that aucii a satellite would be so large and so complex it would be like "a small city." He said such a rocket engine could also make possible a landing on the moon or a round trip to Mars. 1 Dr. Edward Doll, vice president of Space Techno- logical Laboratories, Inc., of Los Angeles, said less pre- cision is required to place, a satellite into orbit than to hit a particular target on earth with a missile. He said that because of the extreme accuracy and quidance required in tiring an intercontinental missile, America's ICBM program has proved an excellent" foundation for future space technology.   

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