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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: March 13, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - March 13, 1959, Long Beach, California                             SUES MISSING CASANOVA FOR DIVORCE 'Ding-Dong Daddy's Wife, No. 17, at Least, Shocked IKE CALLS ON SOLONS FOR BILLION AID Terms Sum as Necessary to Survive MRS. JUNE PUCKETT VAN WIE, 73, poses in her home with her dog, Rusty, after she filed for divorce against 72-year-old Francis H. Van Wie. She's 17th known wife of the so-called "Ding-Dong Daddy of the. D Measles Vaccine Developed Here at VA Hospital A vaccine for measles has been developed in a loca laboratory, The Press-Telegram learned today. In its preliminary trial it gave significant protection against the. disease to the test group. The vaccine was developct WAGER Youth, 17, Drinks 5th on Bet, Dies KANSAS CIJY C. Lea Jr., 17, died Thurs- day night after making a wager he could drink a fifth of whisky in less than five minutes. Marion Beeler, acting chief of-police at suburban Ray town, said police are holding two older youths for investigation. He said Harold L. Barber, 20, and by consultants at the Long Beach Veterans Administra ion Hospital. They refuse to comment 01 he vaccine until their initia report is published in a medical journal.' It was learned, however that the vaccine is made from dog distemper virus. The local medical invest! jators have fT-nd a relation ship between red measles i man and the canine diseas of distemper. 4 INJECTION OF distempe virus apparently stimulate the development in the bod of mechanisms to defen the seat of the car because he was "groggy." Barber found Lea deac when he returned to the car a few hours later. Huge Water Fight at the Heat LOS ANGELES Polic said about 400 University Southern California studen staged a mammoth wat fight on Fraternity Ro Thursday night, dousing on tnother with buckets an garden hoses. The Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1959 Vol. LXXIl-No. 34 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 Cuts Hit Lest U. S. be 'Graveyard's Richest Nation' WASHINGTON dent Eisenhower asked Con gress today for in foreign aid. He said the spending is essential to sur vival in the face of a "grow ing Communist potential launch a war of nuclear de- struction." In a special message Eisen- hower cautioned against reck- less cuts, lest the States become "the nation in the graveyard of history." The President said the full amount is urgently needed to thwart "a fanatic conspiracy of: international communism which maintains million men under arms in about 400 around the world. 50 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-H81 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) 'Delighted1 Ike Gets Hawaii Bill United richest SINGLING OUT Russia's drive to force the West out of Berlin, Eisenhower said: "In Europe today the So- viet Union has made demands regarding the future of Ber- lin which, if unmodified, could have perilous conse- quences. "The resoluteness with which we and our Allies will meet this issue has come about in large measure be- cause our past programs ol economic and military assist- ance to our NATO Allies have aided them to stanc SACRAMENTO (UPI) firm in the face of threats. 3-year-old woman filed a di- orce suit against her missing FRANCIS H. VAN WIE 'Ding-Dong Daddy' SPEAKING of the world iusband then Red threat against free early swooned earned he was when she San Fran- isco's famed "Ding-Dong Daddy of the D Car Line." Mrs. June Puckett Van nations, Eisenhower told the legislators: "Two f u n d a m e ntal pur poses of Our collective de fense effort are to preven Wie, of nearby Del Paso general war and to dete Heights, was speechless for a Communist local aggression moment when informed she against measles. It appears that measles an idistemper have somewhat th same relationship as that smallpox and cowpox. Sma! pox vaccine is made from suspension of the virus th produces cowpox in cow The cowpox virus gives ma immunity to smallpox. The measles vaccine, if proves successful, will be boon to medical science. Measles sometimes caus vere complications. La ear there were more th; M) deaths from measles vice as many as from polio. The U. S. Public Health ervice estimates there were cases of measles in 958. JESS LEA JR. Made Fatal Wager James H. Yates, 22, had signed statements about the bizarre wager. Yates and Barber related they had accepted Lea's bet that he could drink a fifth of liquor in less than five minutes. Barber said in his state- ment that Lea then opened the bottle and drank about three-fourths of it without taking the bottle from his mouth. put it down and said 'I feel pretty Bar- ber added. "Then he smoked a cigarette and we talked a little and then he killed it." Barber and Yates said they then drove to Ray- town where they left Lea in was at least the 17th wife of Van Wie one-time car-barn Casanova. "Why, I had no she sputtered. "He led me to be- ieve he had married only once before." VAN WIE, now 72, came nto prominence in 1946 when "We know the enormou and growing Communist po tential to launch a war o nuclear destruction and thei (Continued Page A-2, Col. Ike Slates Talk on Berlin Crisis WASHINGTON it was discovered that the dent Ejsenhower will make streetcar motorman on San Francisco's D Line had been married 11 or 12 or 13 had never been divorced. The balding, roly-poly mo- torman was convicted on three counts of bigamy in a ial that earned him a short rm in San Quentin Prison nd a reputation as the Ding-Dong daddy of the D THE PRESS-TELEGRAM as told by a hospital ob- erver that the new vaccine as been given to at least 100 persons and that it gave pro :ontinued on Pg. A-4, Col. 3 Blaze Kills Children, Two Adults EASTON, Me. versons, including five chi dren, perished early today i fire that destroyed the ive-room cottage in snow bound Easton, about 10 mile Then in 1953, wives No. 14 5 and 16 filed complaints in os Angeles and Van Wie as convicted of bigamy gain. During the trial, a psy- hiatrist described the former motorman as "not a criminal a compulsive roman- from the Canadian border. The victims were John He sey, 41, five of his six chi dren, and Carl Lundy, 50, a overnight guest of the He seys. The children were John, 1 Vitcoria, 8; James, 7; Eliza nationwide televisior.-r a d i address Monday night on th Berlin crisis and the ge eral security position of th United States and its allies Announcing this today, th White House said Eisenhow will speak over all networl from his office for 30 mi utes starting at p. p. m. Long Beach time There was no immedia word "on what prompted t request at this partial! HEY'RE HAILING STATEHOOD WITH A HULA Boy and girl hula dancers at right draw smiles and cheers from crowd of statehood celebrants on; a Waikiki street. News of Hawaii's acceptance into the Union Thursday as the 50th state sent thousands into the streets in a series of demonstrations that resembled V-J Wirephoto.) Kidnap-Ransom Now Ma1 Duncan Defense VENTURA Elizabeth Duncan's attor- ey today gave a jury trying her on a murder charge his theory'of how her daughter-in-law, met a violent ;eath: Two men kidnaped Olga iuncan, a 30-year-old Cana- ian nurse, to hold her Drisorier and demand ransom rom her attorney husband, Frank. "She" offered some resist- said S. Ward Sulli- van, "and instead of having a victim for ransom, they've ;ot a corpse on their hands.' Augustine Baldonado and Moya have testified that VIrs. Duncan offered them to kill the nurse. The prosecution contends she was fiercely jealous of her son's marriage to Olga. i SULLIVAN SAID that the men were extorting money from Mrs. Duncan and impli cated her because she identi fied them to police. "They go on the witness stand and try to make a.casi against Elizabeth Duncan who happens to be unfor unate enough to dislike Olga and resent her marriage to ler Sullivan said. "Now it's easy to accuse :r of participation in it avenge themselves, and try to save their own necks." Sullivan termed his theory 'just ieve as reasonable to be as the prosecution's hired-killer theory. The case could go to the jury today, or early nex week. The defense attorney took over Thursday after Dist Atty. Roy Gustafson declared that the grandmotherly Mrs Duncan is glad her son's wife was killed last Nov. 18. Gus tafson called Frank Duncan "a spineless jellyfish." SULLIVAN drew a diagona cross, similar to a railroa' (Continued on Pg. A-4, Col. 4 VAN WIE told Los Angeles authorities he had no desire o marry again. I just w a n t to die in he explained. So, he was jailed for six months and placed on proba the provision that le would marry no more. In view of Van Wie's latest violation, Los Angeles au- thorities expressed some con- cern as to the little man's whereabouts. But the latest Mrs. Van Wie was no help. She said they were married n June 1957 after a four- month courtship but that he left her six months ago. Mrs. Van Wie said the only contact she had had with her husband since was a postcard mailed from Albuquerque, N. beth, 5, and Cindy, 4. Hersey's wife, Christin 40, and the only survivin child, Deanna, 13, escaped from the blazing wooden dwelling by crashing through a first-floor window. Snow drifts as much as 4 feet deep on the highways prevented help from reaching the scene in time. it bore no return ad- dress. Don't Abbreviate Hawaii's Name HONOLULU ab- breviate Hawaii, says post- master George T. Hara. Post Office regulations say the fledgling state's name should be spelled out. DUNCAN BOWS HIS HEAD As his mother watches him, Frank Duncan drops his head and closes his eye while the district attorney relates details of the strangulation slaying of Dun can's young wife, Olga. Mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Duncan, is on trial in Ventur, for of hiring two men to kill Wirephoto.) WASHINGTON (Ft v- The awaiian Islands will become e nation's 50th state within e year. Congress answered the ter- tory's half-century of plead- g for statehood Thursday ith a resounding 323-89 vote the House. The Senate as- tnted a day earlier with a 6-15 vote. President Eisenhower got e bill today. His approval certain. Presidential Secre- ary James C. Hagerty sale e President is delighted. In four to six. months awaii could be a full partner n the union. It will take that ong to set up elections for nearly people to loose their first state offi ers, their two U.S senators nd one representative in the ouse. Hawaii will qualify or a second House scat afte le 1960 census. THERE IS A maximum ime schedule set out in thi late Constitution which thi eople of Hawaii, tired o adopted in 1950. Th maximum is 160 days be ween the date the Presiden igns the bill and the date o general election. T h dual time could be less. Gov. William F. Quinn, 1211 nd last presidentially ap xjinted governor of Hawai aid he is inclined to favo schedule on the slow side He thought that would be pre erred by political leaders o parties to get gooc andidates in the field. Quiri s a Republican and a candi Continued on Pg. A-4, Col. 5 DOG DIES AT 13 WHERE TO FIND IT An Assembly showdown i scheduled today on a bill to ax personal property in the jossession of but not owned >y firms with federal defense jrojects, particularly affect- ing Los Angeles County, which stands to lose 58 mil- lion dollars in tax revenue il the bill loses. See Page B-ll Beach B-l. Hal B-7. B-7. to 15. B-l 2, 13i B-10. Death B-2. B-3. Shipping B-8. C-l, 2, 3. C-5. Tides, TV, B-14. B-7. B-4, 5. Your A-2. Postman's Pal Faithful to the End ALBERT LEA, Minn. tP> old, limping black Labrador named Midnight followed postman Al Fligge on his route for the -last time Thursday. "We were planning to re- tire about the same said the veteran mailman, "but old Midnigh beat me to it." Midnight was a. spry, playful 2-year-old when he the relay box on the "He kept coming over to and Fligge first meti n 1948. corner and 1 kept petting Fligge recalled. Before long the dog, owned by Mr. and Mrs. Er- win Engel, was accompany- ing Fligge faithfully on his rounds. A strong bond grew between them. Mid-' night whined and brobde'd whenever Fligge was ill arid needed a substitute. A few weeks ago it be- came apparent that the dog could not live much longer. Unable to negotiate steps and unsure of his feet, Midnight stumbled to the. ground often, hitting his chin. HIS OWNERS decided to put him out of his misery. Fligge said a long, affec- tionate goodby to Midnight Thursday and Jeff the Ert- gel home to deliver his mail. Mrs. Engel wanted the dog at home this last day. But he fussed and moaned when the door closed be- hind Fligge. Mrs. Engel opened it and let the dog out. "That was what he she said. Minight stumbled down the front sttps and tried to hurry after Fligge. The mailman stopped and wait- ed patiently for him. To- gether they moved off down the street. Midnight was dead a few hours later. Weather- Coastal fog tonight and early Saturday. Mostly sunny Saturday and slightly cooler. Max- imum temperature by noon today: 68.   

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