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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: February 28, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - February 28, 1959, Long Beach, California                             8 DIE IN CHy REN'S RINK COLLAPSE The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 19S9 Vol. 50 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 20 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-H61 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Army, AF Poise Rockets for Orbits of Sun, Poles ATLAS MISSILE GUEST A truck'hauling an Atlas missile spent the night in Long Beach, then resumed its run through the city early this morning west on Pacific Coast Hwy. The missile truck parked overnight near the Hawaiian Restaurant, 4645 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., when traffic became Photo) _________ DA DIVES ON TOP OF 1T CHP Head by Brown pace Shots )ue in Calif. Canaveral Thor-Able With Futuristic Cone Fired in Florida CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. Air Force fired a Thor-Able test rocket with a futuristic nose cone early oday in a dramatic prelude :o a space-probing double- BECK AFTER SENTENCING Former Teamster Union president. Dave Beck, 64 talks to newsmen Friday after being sentenced to five years in prison and fined He main tained innocence. Story on Page A-3 (AP Photo leader expected before the weekend is over. After the towering Thor Able started its journey down the Atlantic SEPARATE PEACE DUE? Disclose Nikita Will Make Trip to East Germany BliRLIN Premier Khrushchev will come to East Germany to attend the Leipzig Trade Fair which opens Sunday. Presumably he will take advan- tage of the occasion lo talk over the Berlin crisis with SACRAMENTO 46- year-old prosecutor is Cali- fornia's new Highway Patrol Commissioner. Gov. Brown appointed Dist. Atty. Bradford Critteriden of San Joaquin County Friday to take over the patrol post from Commissioner B. R. Caldwell, who resigned effective March 16. The nomination of Critten- den, a Republican, to the job requires Senate confirmation. BROWN SATD Crittenden will take a major part in the state's new "get tough" high- way safety program. Crittenden, whose home is in Stockton, has been district attorney for four years. He is a graduate of College of Pacific and Hastings Law School. Caldwell is a former depu- ty chief of the Los Angeles police. He is stepping down after 34 years as a law en- forcement officer. He an- nounced his resignation Fri- day after Brown told his news conference he would not re- appoint him. Guest at Party Tosses I GLENDALE party guest pulled the pin on a phosphorous hand grenade early today and rolled it into the living room of an apartment. Lloyd A. Wilson. 23, clutched the grenade to his chest, dove onto a couch and absorbed the fiery ex- plosion with his body. He was burned seriously now Cause of Tragedy; 9 Injured Recreation Chief Among Dead in Center LISTOWEL, Ont. oof of the Listowel arena ollapsed today, apparently under a heavy weight of now, during a Peewee Hock- y League practice game. Seven children under 12 and jne adult were killed. Nine- een were injured. Twenty-five children and wo adults were in the build- "g- Seventeen were taken out shortly before noon. One of he dead was Listowel Recre- ation Director Kenneth Mc- Leod. Coach Norm Stirling was the other adult in the building. a t AGES OF PEEWEE hockey players are 12 years and un- der. Some of the injured were reported in serious condition at a hospital. Only the entrance to the arena, built five years ago, re- mained standing. Percy Knoblauch, manager of the arena on the eastern outskirts of this town of just 25 miles north- west of Kitchener, said he was standing at the entrance when the walls buckled. Then the roof caved in. Fight Tax Increase, State Solon Urges Makarios Grounded, Tries Again LONDON Makarios departed for Rome by plane today on the first leg of his return to Cyprus after three years in exile. It was his second attempi to leave London. Earlier he another airline: that returned to London afte one engine went dead soon after takeoff. The bearded 45-year-ok Greek Cypriot leader was un shaken by the incident an stepped out of the four-en gined DC6 smiling. A triumphant welcom awaits Makarios' return t the island from which he wa banished by the British thre SACRAMENTO Iff) As- semblyman John L. E. Collier (R-Los Angeles) says Califor- nia do'esn't need any new taxes. He urged a taxpayers' re volt Friday. years ago for refusing to d nounce terrorists. Peace has come to th British crown colony about become a republic with pro pects that the archbishop w be elected the first presiden 1. A. Teen Crashers' Slay Man LOS ANGELES (UPI) Ufred Ovalle, 21, was shot in le back and killed by a gang f party crashers who escape fter the shooting shortly Her midnight today. Police said about 25 teen igers were attending a party n the Estrada Courts housin >roject when four olde youths attempted to come in They were driven away b the mother of one of tl teenagers, Mrs. Mary Tova ami other guests. The party-crashers returns with several friends and fight started on the law when they tried to enter tl residence. During the fight one of tl intruders fired .four sho from a small-caliber pisto Ovalle was hit as he a tempted to flee and the old youths fled in an auto. in his face, chest, arms and j lands, and is threatened with blindness in one eye. Police said Wilson and iome friends, as a practical oke, took two grenades to party given by Marlys 'aulson, 24, in her apart- ment. When Wilson saw the >renade roll in, he'said, he  eace treaty with Germany. Some of the diplomats were nclined to view the Leipzig Fair as nothing more than an excuse for Khrushchev to East Germany and conduct on the spot talks with East German officials. v THE OFFICIAL explanation of the visit, according to ADN, was that Khrushchev had been invited by the Eas' German regime to visit the fair, the world's biggest East West trading event. Both the Soviet Union anc East Germany have said they may sign a separate peace treaty if the West refuses to After the collapse at a.m. station wagons started a shuttle service with the nju'red between the arena and Memorial Hospital two blocks away. Residents flacked to the rena to give assistance. Some worked to revive the rescued youngsters. LISTOWEL is in Ontario's snow belt. About 25 inches of snow, made heavy because of meet Soviet terms on a peace-------- treaty for all of Germany. The Soviet Union announced last month it wants a Ger- a thaw that increased the moisture content, was re- ported.in the area. There have been other root collapses in the belt this win- ter. Three persons were killed and eight injured Jan. 24 when the roof of a curling rink collapsed at Hotel Britan- nia, a Lake of Bays holiday resort near Huntsville, 47 miles north of Orillia. RIDERS REVOLT ON THE FINAL day of Ihe (Continued on Pg. A-3, Col. 6) TEACHING METHODS UNDER SCRUTINY 45 Pet. of Top High School Seniors Flunk UC's Exams in Basic English SACRAMENTO citizens commission set up by the Legislature is trying lo figure out why about half the high school seniors who take the University of Cali- fornia's "Subject A" examination in basic English flunk the exam. James J. Lynch, professor of English at the university, said Friday that about 45 per cent of the students failed the exam last year, and about 50 per cent flunked in the two preceding years. "These figures are worse than they Lynch told the commission, which has been investigating the state's public schools. He said the students who took the examination usyally were selected with care by high-school administrators. "These are people who should have passed, in the minds of their .Lynch said. The professor urged that prospective high-school English teachers be required to take more English and fewer education courses. Lynch said he knew of a San Francisco Bay Area high school that used no literature textbook for a sophomore English class, but employed appliance-.company adver- tising brochures for a one-unit "keeping house" program included in the course. At another Bay Area school, he said, graduating seniors entering the university had never read poetry and "had never even heard of Chaucer, Milton, Byron or Whit- man." man peace treaty that would recognize. Germany's present boundaries, including the (Continued on Pg. A-3, Col. 7) Three Kidnap Bank Chief to Get RIVER EDGE, N. J. hree bandits kidnaped the resident of a savings and oan association Friday night, orced him to open the office afe and escaped with 04. W. Sheldon Davis, 44, head >f the River Edge Savings ,oan Assn., left his office after work and pulled his car nto Ihe driveway of his home. The men approached him rom a car parked nearby. "We know who you one said. "If you do what we say, you won't get hurt." THEY ORDERED Davis at gunpoint into the back of his car, drove to his office and had him open the combina tion-Iock door to the cubicle where the money was kept They stuffed cash into their pockets. FAREWELL KISS Former Havana chief of police cars Col. Juan Salas Canizares kisses his wife before facing firing squad in Matanzas, Cuba, where he was tried and found guilty of torturing and killing 20 persons and ordering "disappearance" of many revolutionaries, The execution was carried Weather- Night and morning fog along the coast. Mostly sunny Sunday. iLittle change in temperature. Quief Chaps Suddenly Up in Arms LONDON (Ri Thera were rumblings of rebel- lion on the railroad line to Chorleywood and points west Friday night. Derby-halted, umbrella-, carrying, dor.'l-speak-to-rne- unless we've been -i ntro- duced commuters not only spoke but shouted. And, what's more, they actually shook their um- brellas. The p.m. from Marylebone, London, bound for such sedate residential districts as Chorleywood and Little Chalfont, in Buckinghamshire, stopped stayed 50 minutes. A brigade of chaps jumped out of their car- riages and marched up the line shouting and lifting their elegant, tightly-rolled umbrellas in anger. RAILWAY officials fin- ally came along and coaxed them back into their car- Meanwhile, at Little Chalfont, along the line apiece, passengers waiting on the platform were get- ting up a petition asking local parliamentarians to find out why their train was late. It was late because the engine broke down.   

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