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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - February 27, 1959, Long Beach, California                             YEAR OF TURMOIL Peterson Quits as President of LBSC in June Dr: P. Victor Peterson, president of Long Beach State College since it was founded here in 1949, today announced his resignation, ef- fective with the close .of school business June 30. No reason was specified in a brief statement of resig- nation released by the 67- year-old educator who wouk reach mandatory retirement age in three years. HIS STATEMENT Dr Peterson said: "Prior to my departure on an extended faculty recruiting trip through the Midwest an the East, 1 am taking this oc c a si on to announce my re tirement from state service a of the close of business Jun "It has been a source personal and professiona pleasure to have been asso dated with the establishment and development of Long Beach State College, and to have experienced the.strong community support that has made this accomplishment possible. My post-retirement plans are indefinite at this time." 'NEITHER DR. PETERSON nor authorities in the State De partment of Education have made any reference to a sue cessor to the post or to whether other administrativi changes might be forthcom ing. Nor was there specia reference to the controversy that has raged around Dr Peterson's administration th past year. Under the procedure for ap pointing state college pres dents, Dr. Roy S. Simpson stale superintendent of in slrjiction, places the name o a.nominee before the State L A. DEMOCRATIC DR; PETERSON College Head Resigns Board of Education for ap roval. State board .meetings, are cheduled for March 12 and 13 n San Jose, April 8 and 9 in acrameiito and May 7, 8 and at San Fernando State Col- ege. Announcement of the uccessor could come during he course of these meetings. t DR. PETERSON'S retire- ment will culminate a 41-year :areer in the field of educa- ion and 37 years in the Cali- ornia state college system. As the first president of Long Beach State College, ap- pointed to the post in June L949, he piloted the school through a period of develop- Philadelphia, Chicago Fail to Block Bid West Coast Wins by Vote of 7 I-35 in Stormy Session BULLETIN WASHINGTON Democratic National Com- mittee after a stormy ses- sion voted 71-35 today to approve Los Angeles as the site of the party's 1960 na- tional convention.. ment acknowledged as phe- nomenal throughout the state and nation. On its 320-acre 7th St. site, the school has sprouted from a bean field to a 20-million dollar educational facility (Continued on Fg. A-6, Col. 1 WASHINGTON Wl Lo Angeles won the first roum today in a battle over the sit of the I960 Democratic pres dential nominating conven tipn. By a vote of 67-39 the Dem ocratic National Committe rejected ah effort to kill it te subcommittee's recom endatioh that the conventio e held in Los Angeles. Th ote was not final, howeve The vote was on a motio y Mrs. T. K. Kendric eorgia national committee oman and a member of t: te subcommittee, to thro ut the report of the grou eached in January at a Ne rleans meeting. Previously amiUe F. Gravel Jr., Lousi; 'COULDN'T STAND IT Tress the Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1959 Vol. LXXII-No. 23 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 40 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Rescue Boys 17 Hours on Cliff na committeeman and chair- of the site subcommittee, ad urged adoption of its re- wrt. R E P R E SENTATIVES of 'hiladelphia and Chicago, wo of the .other cities bid- ding for the 1960 meeting lacked the motion. Gbv. .Ijivid Lawrence ol 'ennsylvaiiia said the Demo crats would-be making one o he greatest mistakes their jarty ever made if they took convention to the Wesi Coast. .He said 85 per cent of the delegates come from the Mid die West and Eastern Sea board. He added if they had to shoulder the expense o travel to the West Coast they probably would not contrib- EMOTIONS OF THESE two couples are reflected in their faces as they waited for the rescue of their young sons from a seaside cliff near San Francisco. At left are 'Loyal Smith and wife. Right are Mr. and Mrs. George Smith. They are not related. Boys, aged 4 and G, were Wirephotos) Fear Soviet Showdown in Berlin Crisis Frem AP md UPI) British Prime Minister Har- old Macmillan was reported leaning today toward a con ference at the summit to pre- vent war over Berlin, but dip- lomatic sources in London said the Kremlin apparently has decided on a showdown. Diplomatic reports reaching spoke for Chicago, said only London said Soviet Premie ute further nances. to the party fi- Jacob M. Aryey, Illinois na- tional committeeman who six subcommittee members out of eight had attended the New Orleans meeting. Nikita Khrushchev apparently was seeking to put off nego tiations with the West unti PAUL ZIFFREN, CaliforniaJRussia has handed control o Duncan Tells Why He Fled Courtroom VENTURA nervous woman cafe owner testified today that she introduced .Duncan to the two men who have admitted they strangled Mrs. Duncan's pregnant daughter-in-law, But Mrs. Esperanza Esquive! denied under a brisk cross-examination that she was aware that Mrs. Duncan allegedly was trying to hire two assassins when Mrs. Duncan met Luis Moya and Augustine Baldonado. -VENTURA my mother is guilt or hot, I just couldn't stay there in court and liste I couldn't stand it." Attorney Frank Duncan thus explained his tearf flight Thursday from the courtroom where Mrs. Eliz beth Ann Duncan is on trial, accused of hiring two men.cpmmitteeman who- arguedjthe Berlin lifelines over t to kill her daughter-in-law last November. on Pg. A-6, Col. 3) Luis Moya, 20, told the jury that he and another man, Augustine B a I d o n a d o, 25, called at Olga Duncan's apart- ment, lured her to an auto with a story that her husband was there, struck her with the butt end of a gun, and hit her repeatedly as they drove her .toward' Ojai. MOYA SAID she was struck so many times with the gun that it broke and they decided to choke her. "We took turns strangling her, and after a while I fell her pulse and there was he testified. "We took It for granted she was dead We dug a hole with our hands and covered her up." Frank Duncan told news men outside' the courtroom that he wanted his mother l efore they turn Berlin controls over .to their satellite East German government. Macmillan was cast in the role of middleman in trying to break the diplomatic stalemate. All indications were that ie had failed. British press reports from Moscow today prepared for failure and said only an outside chance could save the Macmillan mission. Continued on Pg. A-6, Col. INCHES DOWN a cliff where they were trap dering highway below givi CITY, Calif. (M f look at the ocean" were rescued Thursday after being trapped 17 hours halfway down a 400-foot seaside cliff. A Coast Guard cutter, a elicopter, bloodhounds and more than 100 firemen, po-ice and volunteers joined an j( 11-night search for George c Bobby) Smith Jr., 6, and Gary Smith, 4, who are not elated. n "We was just going' to go a down and go across the j. street to look at the ocean and then we couldn't get back Bobby told his firemen rescuers. The Pacific Ocean cliff is a few blocks from their homes. Showing no effects from the jig adventure except an enormous appetite, Bobby said :hey didn't sleep on the ledge Wednesday night because "we was freezing cold and the rock was terrible hard." Gary was In good condition but suffered from exposure. NO Hotel Converts Room for Nixon MIAMI Maybe Vice President Nixon will make a reservation next time. He arrived in Miami unexpectedly for a brief visit and found his favorite hotel had no rooms available. A conference-dining room had to be converted hastily to accommodate Nixon and his 10-year-old daughter, Julie. The child is recovering from an eye infection which has kept her .out of school for three tonight and clear and sunny Saturday. Continued warm Saturday. Maximum temperature by noon today: 71. -.ALLS 3 Father of 6 Files Complaint on Sons OAKLAND Paulisich, 41-year-old jeweler and the father of six, filed a complaint of "in- corrigibles" against three of his sons in Juvenile Court Thursday. He charged that they ig- nored him, threatened him r ;ently threw stones at the him. The boys are 13, 15 and 16. "In the last couple of said Paulisich "they've been getting worse and worse. I don't know why. They could be good boys. I want them o get straightened out before hey get into serious trouble." Paulisich accused his sons of having drinking and gam- bling parties in his home. He said they threatened him when he objected. He and his wife, Wilma, 46, have three other children, two girls, 12 and 14, and another boy, 6. Police said the three older boys were surly and bitter when taken to Juvenile Hal pending a hearing. One mut tered: "We'll get even." Ready for Tracking Space Shot U.S. Boards Russ Fisher; Wait Report Damage to Atlantic Cables Results in Inspection by Navy By ELTON C. FAY WASHINGTON Iff) The State Department awaited a report from the Navy today before communicating with Moscow on the boarding and high-seas search of a Soviet trawler by a U. S. Navy team, In a surprise action, U. S. bluejackets briefly boarded the trawler in fishing waters off Newfoundland Thursday, They reported nothing to indi- date the Kussians had any- thing to do intentionally with recent breaks in transatlantic cables. What might have hap? pened by accident was Rri open question. A spokesman said the State Department would communV cate with Russia on the mat1 ter through diplomatic chan- nels as soon as a full report is received. AFTER SEARCHING the trawler, the Navy team re; ported: 'No indications of inten- tions other than fishing." The quick negative report, issued by the Navy here a few hours after the boarding was announced, lessened the po- tential impact of the incident on already touchy U. S.-Rus- sian relations. But there was no immediate hdication how Moscow might react. Nations jealous of their sovereignty often resent the boarding of their ships by men of another nation. JAMES C. HAGERTY, White House press secretary, said President Eisenhower had received a preliminary report on the boarding operatioh. The report, Hagerty added, was similar to the "one the Navy made public. The press secretary said Eisenhower will get a full re- Iport as soon as one is re- ceived by the Navy. In reply to a question, Ha- jgerty said Eisenhower did not personally order the boarding. The Soviet vessel is the trawler Novorossisk, with >a crew of 54 men and women. The Navy reported the cap- tain was friendly and cq- pcrative. v THE UNITED STATES cted under an international greement which the Defense Department said "authorizes nvestigations by naval ships of official documents of other Continued on Pg. A-6, Col. 3) JODRELL BANK, England dozen technicians tuned up the world's largest adio telescope today to track another U. S. attempt to pui a space vehicle into orbit, A Jodrell Bank spokesman said the space shot is expec ed "Saturday or Sunday, rle added: "We will be standing b> on the telescope. About dozen technicians will be em- ployed in the tracking opera- tion." The United States has not officially announced the fir- ing. WHERE TO.FIND It Top Democrats split sharp- y today on Gov. Brown's >udget. See Page C-l. Beach B-I.- Hal A-ll. A-ll. C-l to 1.2. D-4, 5. B-6. Death B-2. A-10. B-3. Shipping D-l, D-6. Tides, TV, B-7. Vital C-l. A-ll. B-4, 5. Your A-2.   

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