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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - February 14, 1959, Long Beach, California                             DULLES HAS CANCER, MEDICS REVEAL SPINSTER'S ESTATE-AMAZES HEIRS Million Fortune? The Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY CHILLICOTHE, Ohio.- Wl big mystery in this city today did a 92- year-old spinster parlay her meager earnings as a .tele- phone company clerk into a fortune. ..Before Miss Margaret .Ritter died last Jan. 20, her neighbors knew her as a thrifty woman who wore patched dresses, lived alone in''a modest frame home and "hated to spend a dime." They knew she had money, maybe perhaps even But even her nephew and niece, to whom she left the major share of her huge estate, were flabbergasted at the amount. "We had no idea she had that much, money the nephew, Andrew I. Ritter of Dayton, a 61-year-old Asso- ciated Press employe. And his sister, Mrs. Elsie Marie Wallace of Cleveland, the other chief beneficiary, echoed that sentiment. The bulk of the estate is in securities except for the ANDREW L RITTER Suddenly Wealthy deceased's home here, ac- cording to 'Gordon M; Gra- ham, 'co-executor of -the An. inventory filed Fri- day in Ross Probate Court s h o'w e d th? estate was valued at Graham 'said that after a deduction of more" than a million; dollars in federal and state.taxes and 000 in fees, .-the. two chief beneficiaries each will come into a trust fund of about Graham said Ritter would be allowed to draw ah-in-" come from of around tp'.iiJO'.dOO a year. -is- death the ,in- go to hifjfdaugh- ter, .Mrs. Jack James of Se- attle, Wash. At 'Hitter's! share of the .'prin- cipal will go to-M.rs. Janies'i children. In the, case'of Mrs. Wal- Graham'said she will .her share of the principal'. in quarterly in-, stallments every five years; Jf she' and her husbandidie before the principal is paid entirely, the .remainder goes to Kilter's share of the estate. The only, inkling as to how Miss Ritter accumu- lated the fortune came from her nephew in' ton. .She had good brokers, he said, for a rainy day.-- 13 20 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Castro Quits Army Job to HAVANA, Fidel Castro Cuba will take: leave in Dike Menace W.Terre Haute Bv Associated Pens National .Guardsmen stood warily on guard behind a nastily patched dike at West Terre Haute; as sent the creslt ofcthe siirging-Wabash River from his post as supreme com- mander of .the armed'forces to-become premier of'.Cuba, it sW.as; announced Informed sources said the .armed forces command prob- ably would go to his younger brother, Raul, recently named second in charge. Castro, revolutionary; leader who spearheaded the fight to oust dictator Fulgencio Batista, was named premier Friday night in what was viewed as the first step toward the pres idency. Outgoing Premier .Jose Miro Cardona'ended-a long; i smouldering pe'rsonal feud got into, another fight Friday within .the provisional in'Trehch Warfare By BUD LEMBKE Dyke' .frequently the .center: of 'controversies over .water "service1 in fast- growing West Orange County, gov- ernment when he announced to newsmen that he and his cabinet had that he recommended Castro: be named premier. GOVERNMENT sources said the change indicated no major, split in revolutionary ranks and that Castro would reappoint virtually, all of the 18. cabinet ministers when he takes office Monday. They said the only possible excep- tions were'the ministers of health, commerce, conimuni- cations and economics. Several ministers hailed the change in premiers as "a rev- olutionary step forward." Foreign observers, noting this week's change in the pro- i visional constitution lowering I the age requirement for pre'si- dent from 35 to 30 years, said Casiro's appointment could i herald his eventual elevation 1 to the presidency. Sources said Miro Cardona resigned in a dispute over government policy statements made by Castro. They said the premier felt that Castro's frequent speeches and re- marks on economic and politi- cal issues made it imperative by. using pickup trucks, to block Pacific Water Co. from excavating for a water line here.: Crews of Pacific Water Co. were installing a water line to Coast new 20-home tract "on' the south sjde of Trask. Ave. at Jackson St. I that he rank. command cabinet Cteim China Jets Buzzed Airliner LONDON (UPI) British Overseas Airways Corp. 'charged today that two Chi- nese Nationalist Sabre jets buzzed a Comet IV jetliner between Hong Kong and Tokyo two weeks ago. A spokesman for the gov- protest was being made about the incident, which occurred Jan. 30, He said some of the 50. per- sons aboard the and technicians, took pictures of close-flying Nationalist To' reach the tract, the crews started to dig a trench just south of the Trask Aye. curb line in order to make connection with an existing Pacific Water Co. trunk line on Jefferson St. WAVING A COPY of, an easement giving Diyke sive use of a 10-foot- strip along the south side of Trasjc Dyke Duke Rezac ordered his men to block the': trenching ma- chine with two pickup Police summoned to 'keep the peace surveyed -the: 'situa- tion and issued-a! citation; to Carlyn E -Bpsteiman, of one pickups, ,fpr "failure to ;-obey a lawful order" and to. park with wheels 1ft inches from the curb." All principals then retired o City Administrator James Black's office to dicsuss the above -expected levels; 'as 'go' wheth- er "the dike, punctured once but quickly plugged up again early, today, would, keep ris- ing Wahash backwaters out of the town; where 150 families already have helped raise the Wabash to; 24.6 feet at day- break, instead of-the expect- ed 24.3. Flood, stage is 14 feet.' Approximately 150 homes are. in the: 16-square-block area where .the break came in the Creek, a swollen; tributary of the Wa- bash. Alb "the' families had been evacuated in advance, however, and the amount of water that poured intOi the area was not substantial. The break was repaired in 30 minutes. THE TOWN'S FATE ap- jeared to depend on the ef- fectiveness of the dike and the extent of new rains. The Weather Bureau said the rain I! Killed, I Missing .as Flames.Rip .Ky. Apartments "By Ajjxlttcd Prtis Eire tragedies in the-.United States and Canada .early., to- day cost the lives of at least 18 persons and injured many others. Eleven were killed in Ash land, Ky., three in Reno, two in Purcell, Okla., and two in Montreal. At least 35 were injured in Kingston, Ont. In Ashland, fire cut through an old apartment building leaving II dead and one miss ing. Eight other person-wen injured. Among the victims were six members of the same family including an e x p e.c t a n mother. She jumped f roni. a of .the second floor then died after giving, birth t a still-born son. THE FIRE, called the wors in Ashland's history, brok out at. a.m. and'q'uickl, cut off the only exit, a stair way at the front of the re converted theater. "Almost .right away, peopl began jumping out of the'win taxi drive tbbhy Blackweli, 'who covered the blaze. Blackweli said he sa' seven occupants standing a AfKR HOSPITAL VISIT .Solemn President Eisenhower walks from; .Army'Hospital today after 37-minute visit.with Secretary of State.tpulles. Maj. Gen. 'Leonard ,Hea- ton, hospital commandant, is with President.'In rear are-Wilton D.': Persons assistant to President, and-Maj..Gen.' Howard Eisen- hower's personal Car Falls Into River, Six Drown ALSO RUSS PARLEY windows in the rear of th building on Greenup Ave. Bu "they disappeared when section of the ceiling appar- ently fell." fire cut just like an acetylene he said.- DELMAR FANNIN, '.one of the 20 occupants of-the stone- (Continued on Pg. At3, Col. 7) day iyheii, their car veered off about 15 miles north of here and plunged into the Poca.River. The bodies were recovered, and the first to be identified was that of Mrs. Edith Hale Spangler, 52, who lived in a trailer park near Youngstown, Ohio.'; From ,ber 'neighbors and Dulles' Illness Delay Allies1 Meet of State Dulles' Ike Extends 1 Leavefrom Cabinet Post More Radiation Therapy Slated for Secretary WASHINGTON ary of State Dulles has cancer and will continue on eave from his post whils undergoing radiation'therapy. President Eisenhower, after visiting Dulles at Walter Reed said he had ex- pressed the thoughts and >rayers of all of us that of his- operation and the further course of treat- ment will be successful. "In order to allow time for this purpose .the secretary continues on leave of .ab- sence." The announcement came shortly after Eisenhower had spent 37 minutes at Dulles' bedside. A MEDICAL REPORT is- sued afterwards said that when Dulles was operated on for hernia Friday morning a small nobular implant" was re- moved from the hernia sac and proved upon examina- tion .to be an "adenocarci- a small cancer. The medical announcement also said that.the fluid removed at the time the hernia sac was repaired was found under the microscope .to contain "free cancer cells." "No further surgery is con- the announce- ment said. "In the immediate uture radiation therapy will >e used." The announcements by iisenhower. and Dulles' doc- tors left completely unclear whether-Dulles ever will be able .to: return: to his State -1, _! i j for a western foreign ministers meeting at Paris m mid- March to prepare for possible negotiations with Russia on Germany'. Officials said it seerned ap- (Continued on Pg. A-3, Col. 5) WHERE TO FIND IT A-4, 5. B-2 to 9. A-45. B-10. Death B-2. B-2. Shipping B-2. A-8, 9, 10. A-2. Tides, TV, B-IO. Vital B-2. 'riends: it was learned that He other, victims lived in Youngstown. Th'ey were Mrs. MadelineiRusseilj 32, and her 'our an" earlier marriage, .who.bore the name of Bowden; They were Made- line Lee, 13; iris, 11; Kim, 9, and Juanitaj-8; STATE TROOPER G. W. Dickson said! the T death of all six was attributed to drown- ing. The accident .appeared to have been caused by rocks in the highway washed down during the night's rain. parent Dulles would not be able to attep.d such a meet- ing. It is even-uncertain-'now whether he will be able to participate in the 10th anni- versary session of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization here in early April. State Department Press Of- ficer ;Lincoln. White said the doctors expect that Dulles will have to remain in Walter leed Hospital1 for severa1 weeks'. WHETHER THIS will delay a possible foreign' ministers meeting with the 'Soviet Un ion is'still'to be determined Some officials said it woulc not necessarily have that re suit. Quiz Again to Cat I oh H of fa WASHINGTON e'nate Rackets'Committee ;ill'qbestion Teamster pres- dent James .R. Hoffa behind losed doors Monday aboul evelppments since their last t o r m y get-together months ago. ssues. Police Chief Connor Col- acott.said after the confer- ence that Dyke was apparent- y within its rights in oppos- ing the trench excavation on Its easement. "THE METHOD in Stop- ping it was, however, some- what said Col lacotL He said Pacific, could have dug the trench in street just north of south curb without; trespassing on the Dyke easement The prospect has been tha a foreign ministers', meetinj would be held probably ii Geneva, or Vienna in lat April or May. Should Dulles' condition re sist treatment-and make necessary for him to.remai nactive, the circumstance on the diplomatic front coul :orce President Eisenhower' land as to whether Dulle should continue.as'secretar of state or not. this depends on the extent of ihfcVcaiicer and on Dulles' to treatment. MEANWHILE, it appeared hat foreign policy direction would be in. the hands of Undersecretary of S ta Christian A. Herter. He is due oh Pg. A-3, Col. 1) New Storm Rain Sunday A weather front in. the Pa- six cific near the California-Ore- gon border may .bring rain Counsel Robert F. Kennedy would not tell newsmen if loffa was summoned in con- nection with the committee's nvcstigation of racketeering n the multimillion-d o 11 a r uke-box and coin-machine usiness. The committee will resume public' hearings Tuesday'. on to the Southland Sunday, the weatherman said. The forecast calls for the rain belt to... extend as; far south as Santa Barbara by Sunday .afternoon or even- ing. There is a 60 per cent chance for the Long Beach-Los Angeles area Sun- day night, the forecast added. Locally heavy snow is due for the mountains Sunday alleged gangland invasion of with the snow level lowering WARM' WINTER SUNBA7H .Using a sled fora lounge, DeAnn DeForrest 16, and Margie Reisdorph, 16, both of Minneapolis, went sunbathing Friday atop generous coating of snow, when the mercury hit a melting 39 Wirephoto) EISENHOWER- has 'mad clear on several occasion that he urgently, hopes -and prays that Dulles will be able to resume his duties] The President's statement today carefully avoided any suggestion of any other out- come than radiation treat- ments or possible .future sur- gery- Authorities here recognize however, that if Dulles re mains incapacitated in the final period of preparation for a meeting'with the Rus sians, the President will face a very-difficult-decision, as to whether, he' ca'ii' afford to send an 'acting secretary of state to.the conference.table. A delay in the .meeting, it- the Russians will agree to meet at re- garded by many authorities here as highly, undesirable. They want to test out whether Russia is willing to make some agreements on Germany and they also want to avoic the danger of a Berlin block ade. the lucrative juke-box field in New York. Witnesses in four .days of initial sessions this week charged'that racketeers had founded, one-union after an- other to force tribute from juke-box operators through use of professional pickets'. to feet. Weather- Increasing cloudiness to- night and Sunday with CO per cent chance of rain Sunday night. Low tonight 46. SHORTS STIR RUCKUS Rebel flag Display on Backside Blasted MIAMI, Fla. United Daughters of the Con: federacy are up in arms because a young woman tennis player wears a rebel battle flag stitched to the seat of her shorts. They aren't impressed by her title: Dixie interna- tional singles champion. There ougtrtUo be they say. And they are out to get one. "Our legislative committee has been given instructions to said Herbert 0. Vance of Coral Gables, presi- dent of'the Florida chapter. "THERE HAVE BEEN OTHER incidents of said Mrs. M. F. Wittichen, also of Coral Gables, president- general of the national group. "But this is, rather extreme." The target of the verbal artillery is 25-year-old Laura: Lou Kunnen of Clearwater. She is rather dismayed by the; attack. "Move that rebel she said. "If I have to it off the outside of my. shorts I'll sew it on underneath." Nevertheless, Laura the first wore her shorts to the Clearwater court without the flag..   

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