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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: February 10, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - February 10, 1959, Long Beach, California                             TWISTER KILLS 19 IN MID-ST. LOUIS The Finett Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2.S9M 28 PAGES rELEPHONEHES-mi HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Storm Crumples Apartments and Homes; 265 Hurt ST. LOUIS tornado struck a deadly blow at the'heart of St. Louis in the today with out warning. Nineteen .were known dead. Another 265 were in DEBRIS IS PILED HIGH in the Whittier St. section of St day 1 jght breaks over ruins left by tornado that hit after Wirephoto.) State Must fay Bonelli Life Pension SACRAMENTO (UPI) Legislative Counsel Ralph N Klips has ruled that Call fomia must pay a month pension for life to Wil liam G. Bpnelli, it was learned today. a former .membe of the State Board of Equal zation, is in a jail cell Mexico City awaiting a final decision on extradition to California to face a bribe in! dtctment in Riverside County. IThe state has accused him of accepting bribes for liquor FALSE SIGNALS BLAMED Ike Believes Russ Lure Yank Planes WASHINGTON Eisenhower voicec belief today that some American planes have been FC11CL f lured across Iron Curtain country borders by false adio signals. Eisenhower told a new conference that American ilots have strict orders no jured, 55 seriously. It said latest reports from the St. Louis chapter added that 400 other persons have been injured or hospitalized. Robert C. Edson, national director of Red Cross disaster services, en route to Denver for a Red Cross meeting, was intercepted and ordered into St. to aid in disaster work. Herbert Smith, na tional building adviser also was ordered to St. Louis from leadquarters here. Numerous persons wer rapped in homes and apart ments which-crumpled unde the storm's blows. THE STORM took the same path of this city's worst tor- nado which killed more than 100 in 1927. January's IdleUstat juui> IKITV ttieir meiiKxiicai jiunt iui uic to play a fox-and-hound game dead and the living-caught in iy flying along Soviet bor- falling bricks, concrete and licenses while he was the Southern California member Of the Board of Equalisation. HIS JAIL cell, Bon- elli'applied last month for the pension. He had reached the retirement age of 63. Kleps said Bonelli was t paid-up member of the retire me'nt system when he left California- in 1952 after he was indicted. WASHINGTON ployment rose by in January to It was the highest number idle in any January since befor World War II. G o v e rnment statistician said that from a statistical tandpoint, however, comparable, to. January 1950 unemployment fig They say crossed the due The attorney said that state pension law. does not exclude from benefits either a person convicted of a crime or a per son who has been chargec with a crime but who keeps himself out of the reach o the' courts of California. BONELLI ASKED that hi checks be mailed to Mexic City. A Mexican judge rule that California cannot extra i dite the former liquor cza but his decision now awaits i final ruling from higher au thorities. State Controller Alan Cran i ston has asked Atty. Gen 1 Stanley Mosk for o 1 the legality of Bonelli's claim and whether the state mu mail the checks to Mexico o can hold them until Bone there may be an error margin perhaps in such estimates. A seasonal decline in em- ployment is usual in January. The number of Americans t work dropped by in Decem- ber to in January. THE.MONTHLY joint re- port of the Commerce and comes to get them. He suggested that if tl state must mail .the check the Legislature should 1 asked for remedial legislatio to prevent this in the future. Mighty Roar Was Signal of Disaster By DON ROTH ST.' LOUIS "I sa a blue flash of light and heard a terrible roar. shook the ground. The wasn't any warning an the wind seemed to sta forever." Thus newspaper vend Searchers worked through- out the night, turning over rubble in frantic rescue efforts. At .dawn, they renewed their methodical hunt for the Gay Gross, 62, described t tornado which smashed Louis early today. He was street in west central Louis hoping to- sell a f papers to late tavern patro when the storm hit. It was in. this general a where a number of persons ders, in .order, ,tp gam, intell erice information.; The President was' asked whether been oc casions in-which U. S. planes such as the' 'unarmed' trans- port reported shot down by he Russians jast September had been tryirjg' to draw' So- viet fighters into.the air. The firm- ly that he had; issued .very strict'orders some; time ago against any such tactics. 1 v 'HE WENT ONTO say that American -planes' sometimes iumber.-.; .The tornado hit at a.m First it hit two suburbs Brentwood and Crestwood in PATH OF ST. LOUIS TORNADO AND CENTER .OF MAIOR DAMAGE Ohio faces New Peril of Floods Ohio state of emergency existed in THETJGHTS went out and Flndlay'; 'and another emer- .nnim aonru nrfv'Tfltn.aHon was-bcinfi were trapped in which collapsed. buildings .abor Departments attributed the job decline to seasonal factors such as release of navigational errors. And, he added, he believes false radio signals once in a while have drawn U. S. planes over Soviet'or satellite terri- tory.. But for American planes to do anything to cause Soviet fighters to "scramble" in de- fense is strictly against or- ders, he said. IT WAS Eisenhower's 150th news conference since he took southwest St. Louis County then moved northeast into St. Louis. It took, its in an area: bounded roughly, by Olive St., Grand Blvd., New- stead and-' St, Louis Aves. This'is ..a; mile west of down- town St Louis.'-' TORNADOES WERE rag- ing elsewhere, too. Monday, three. small' communities in southwest Missouri near Car- thage .were with .1 everybody was' pretty calm for said Mrs. Lula Kuehner, a waitress. She works in one of the many taverns, cafes and night lubs in the Bohemian area, called by St. Louisans "our Greenwich where the twister first hit the hardest. g'e'nc'y proclamation was being prepared at.Van Wert today as rain-swollen streams in the northern half of Ohio forced evacuation of thousands. At noon, the Blanchard "Old Mill Stream" of the famous song rieared flood crest-it reached less Dulles to Be Ready for Parleys, Ike Sayi WASHINGTON Eisenhower pre- dicted today that Secretary of State Dulles' illness will cause no delay-in western talks with the Soviets about German problems. Eisenhower spoke at a-news con- ference just after for a hernia operation. CRITICALLY ILL A. few minutes after the storm hit, said Mrs.. Kuehner, excited- people rushed in shouting that there was tre- mendous'damage ''just down the street'f .lie aucci. i- Patrons of taverns poured into the streets, to see if they 76 Navy Men Abroad Victims of Hepatitis HEIDELBERG, Germany U. S. Navy men from'naval units in the Mediterranean area are being treated for hepatitis, an infec- tious liver ailment, in the U. S. Army hospitals at Laridstuhl and Muenchweiler. extra Christmas season work- ers in stores and post offices, and further curtailment of outdoor work. Some of these temporary jackers were not looking for further employment. Hence they' were not counted as among the unemployed. President Eisenhower jumped the gun on the offi- cial report, and told a news conference earlier that he be- lieves there will .be a pickup in employment as the year goes along. EISENHOWER challenged a reporter's remark the idle figure had climbed back to about five million. Eisenhower said it was office six years touched on these other mat ;rs: Khrushchev senhower continued to cold shoulder the informal invita- tion by Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev that he visit Rus- sia. The President s; invitation, set forth speech by the Kremlin leader, was linked with criticism of U. S. leaders. .Certainly, Eisenhower said, he would want a more offi- cial invitation than that a more persuasive one. of the govern- (Continued on Pg. A-5, Col. 1) Weather- Cloudy with rain to- day and tonight Partly ckwdy with a per cent chance of showers Wednesday. Continued cooJ. Maximum tempera- ture by noon today: 55. WHERE TO FIND it Gov. Brown has declared about less than that, or about The ac- tual figures in the government report issued later put Janu- ary unemployment at 000, or less than five million. The President said he does not accept as satisfactory the present level of joblessness. Mamie and Sister to Leove for Resort WASHINGTON UPl Mrs. Mamie Eisenhower and her sister plan to leave tonight for. a two-week vacation at the Maine Chance health and beauty resort near Phoenix, Ariz. war on smog in program, which a six-point he -spelled out to the Legislature Mon- day. See Page A-2. Beach B-I Hal A-S C-4 to 9 Pa 7 A-8 B-J Shipptag C-4 C-l, J, S C-4 Tides, TV, C-W B-I, 5 Your A-2 o several homes hit in a Oblong, causing heavy dam hung for only a few minutes age and injuring a woman in Zeb Williams was sitting a .house trailer; at Mitchell in his room in the top story nd., damaging 20 expensive three-story rooming house when the storm struck area near Carrollton, Ky., in- Still shaking, he told a re- uring six persons and damag- porter, "I heard the wind and (Continued on Pg. A-5, Col. 3) (Continued on Pg. A-5, Col. 4) than three weeks ago at Find- lay. A state of emergency was proclaimed there and a company of National Guard was called out a few hours later to aid in evacuations. At Van Wert, Mayor Clark Spitler was drawing up an emergency .proclamation as Town Creek overflowed the twister downtown section and forcec hundreds to flee their homes .The Van Wert Times-Bulle tin announced at noon that i would be unable fo publish a edition today. Water poured into the basement of th plant. Adj. Gen. Loren Windom ordered a National Guard de molition squad from the 112t Combat Engineers to Fremon on the Sandusky River for possible dynamiting of an ice jam. The showers and thunder- storms, ended in the south- ern portion of the state, were expected to change to snow and snow flurries in the ex- treme north. Lows in the 20s tonight were expected to slow up the runoff. Lacks Heat, Food.Water for 5 Days NEWPORT, R. I. (Pi Mrs. -Rose Blondell, 63, has survived at least five days in an unheated apartment without food or water. Her today was described as cri- tical with her body-temper- ature so low medical thermometers cannot record it. A doctor at Newport Hos- pital said thermometers go only as far as 94 4.6 degrees below normal. HE SAID Mrs. Blondell also suffered from dehydra- tion and frostbite of the legs. The doctor said it may be necessary to amputate the legs. Mrs. Blondell ap- parently collapsed last Wednesday or Thursday The secretary expects to te out of action for some weeks. Despite his age of 70 and his recent history of illness; offi- cials predict he will be back m harness. But western allies expressed a degree of dismay over the illness at a crucial time. In his news conference statement Eisenhower praised Dulles as the most valuable man he has ever known :n the foreign affairs field. He also made clear, that he resents the harsh criticism of American leaders and. policy which Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev coupled last week o an invitation for Eisen- lower to visit Russia. GRIMACING IN PAIN, a man is taken from the wreckage of a three-story building demolished in St. Louis by a tornado early today. The man, not identified, was trapped two hours. His small son, trapped beside him, was dead when help came. More Rain in View as .02 In. Falls Peeking out from under an umbrella splotched with dry rot, the weatherman today predicted more rain for the Long Beach area. Showers started things-off in the wee hours-of the morn- ing. Moderate to heavy rain- fall was expected later in the day. Counting the .02 of an inch of rain that fell early this morning, Long Beach's rain- fall total fbr the season now stands at 1.67 un- der the 8.5 inches normal for this time of year. Wednesday's forecast calls for partly cloudy skies, with a 70 per cent chance of show- ers. The weather is expected to continue cool and windy. Monday's high temperature was 62, and the low early this morning was 44. and was unable to summon help or feed herself. A boy had refilled the container in her kitchen oil range Wednesday .with enough oil to last about 24 hours. The temperature in New- port has been below the freezing mark practically all the time since last Thursday. It was 4 degrees Monday morning. Neighbors, concerned be- cause they had not seen Mrs. Blondell, summoned police Tuesday., Police broke down the door and found the woman semi- conscious.' Khrushchev Invited by 3 Nordk Notions OSLO Minister Einar Gerhardsen said today that Soviet Premier Krush- chev will be invited to visit Norway, Sweden and Den- mark this year. The Socialist prime mini- ster told a news conference EISENHOWER SAID he. understands Khrushchev is more concerned about haying an informal heads of govern- ment meeting than about hav- ing a session of foreign mini- sters. A summit conference, Eisenhower said, would re- quire even more time to pre- pare. In any case the President expects Dulles to be back on the job in time to contribute to preparations. Once his her- nia operation is out of tha way, Eisenhower said, Dul- les will have more time to think about U. S. policy on such issues as the future of Germany. EISENHOWER made these point bearing on his ailing secretary and the conduct of foreign affairs: 1. Dulles is the most valu- (Continued on Pg. A-5, Col. 1) the three Nordic governments have agreed on a joint invi- .Both Norway and Denmark are members of the North At lahtic Alliance. JOHN FOSTER DULLES Facet OpcraitiM   

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