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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: February 9, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - February 9, 1959, Long Beach, California                             FIERY CAR CRASH KILLS 4 AT BEACH The New P-T Type, CdtffrosfecJ Old Here it OLD look. Stories in today's Press-Tele- gram are sat in a completely new, .easy-to-read type 9-point. Imperial. And just to give you an idea of the improvement, this story has been set both ways, with the new type face and with the old: Quite a difference, you'll no- tice. You'll find our new, type face not only perks up your news- paper, but it's easier on the eyes. Letters, and words, are clearer. There's more white space between lines. Instead of having "to squint, your eyes can glide across entire sentences at a glance. You'll find the radio-televi- sion logs clearer, more' read- able. Sports statistics and mar- kets also will appear in new dress. We studied type faces and reader preferences for a full year before today's change. And the change isn't just up front. It extends throughout the paper, even to the want ad section. Classified advertising now is set in crisp, clear Fu- tura. As we makes quite a difference. Here .it NEW look. Stories in today's Press- Telegram are set in a com- pletely new, easy-to-read type Imperial. And just to give you an idea of the improvement, this story has been set both ways, with the new type face and with the old. Quite a difference, you'll notice. You'll find our new type face not only perks up your newspaper, but.it's easier on the eyes.'Letters, and words, are clearer. There's more white space between lines. Instead of having to squint, your eyes can glide across entire sentences at a glance. You'll find the radio-tele- vision logs clearer, more readable. Sports statistics and markets also will appear in new dress.- We studied type faces and reader preferences for a full year before today's change.- And the change isn't just up front.' It extends through- out the paper, even to the want ad section. Classified' advertising now is set in crisp, clear Futura. As we makes quite a difference. Dulles Tells U.S. Sells Arms West Accordto Equip on Berlin Indonesii One as Autos Hit, Gas Explodes Vehicle Hurled off After Collision HUNTINGTON BEACH -Foiv 'persons perished in an auto collision early to day that turned one of th cars into a flaming ball an sent.it plunging over a embankment toward th sea. Three of the victims were burned so badly that imm diate identification of the bodies was impossible. Robert Hardy Linville, driver of one of the cars died on the way to Hoag Memorial Hospital. His home was in San Gabriel, but he was liv- ng in Sunset Beach while at- tending Orange Coast Col- lege. Sole survivor of the fiery crash is Alexander Pauska, 43, of 16821 Pacific Coast Hwy., Sunset Beach. He .was treated in' Hoag Hospital for a- dislocated right, hip and lacerations of the face and head. Pauska was a passen ger in Linville's auto. TWO MEN and a woman died in the flaming wreckagi of the other car. One of them was tentatively identified this morning by Deputy Coroner James Pond as William Earl Stewart, 23, a sailor stationed aboard' the destroyer USS In- gersoll, based at San Diego. The accident occured at on Coast Hwy. on a [hill at the west city limits. From accounts of wit- nesses, police reconstructed ,is sequence of events: The car registered to HOME The Southlantft fittest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, FEBRUARY Vol. I 32 PAGES PRICE 1C CENTS CLASSIFIED HE FELEPHONE HE 5-1161 EDITION (Six Editions DailyV 5 Days of Heavy Rain forecast in Southland UT IT HAPPY wACHTNrThN fAPI By GENE KRAMER Sne, United- said today the Western Al- lioc havp aereed generally w JH.TT on orSres to follow if is the first major sale of. -American mi liUsy equipment the -.right- Russia invokes "physical to the island republic in seyeraLyears. means" to block access to Berlin. .At the same time he re newed the West's offer to talk about a general settlement. "We are willing to talk with the Soviets in a sincere effort to reach he said. Dulles returned to Wash- ington at 8 a.m. aboard a U. S. Air Force plane from talks at London, Paris and Bonn. The secretary said he was reporting promptly to Presi- dent Eisenhower. United- t  Benja- min Franklin Collins, Detroit union official and close asso- 5 night that President Eisen- d the jmpact o{ the col. hower had approved the sale. lisjorl the flaming Jones did not announce the I [o dowh road 440 feet size of the shipment put unr before it plunged over an em official reports said it would n sid UIlcS nraa enced today by U. S. District cent chance of ram by TuesT Judge John M. Cashin to hree years imprisonment for >e' worth about 10 dollars. his talks abroad "reconfirmed the unity and firmness of our position." Dulles added: "We do not accept any sub- stitution of East Germany for the Soviet Union in its re- out of the state, immediately assigned 20 agents to the The road. The auto on the ocean side dropped a dis juais. i i tie auio The sale.was taken-as an tance of 10 feet, landing up Jidication that the down on the Pacific Elec States has faith that President tric rajiroad track and pin Sukarno's government will re- njng the driver and two pas main independent of the So- sengers inside. The car wa viet bloc as well as of theLngulfed in flames. nnlll Tt 1C] West in the cold war. It is certain to boost already-rising jy TOOK workmen fou FBI, acting on the assumption certain to DOOSI aireaay-rising jj TOOK worKmen rou the haul would be transported American prestige still further nours to reach the bodie __L ii__ alir in Tnrlnnp.nin _ nf f n f t l tt Iwith the torches. use of cut tin (Continued on Pg. A-6, Col. 3) Car _______________ and The jewelry was owned by Leon C. Greenbaum, chair- Iman of the board of Hertz I _ _ f, I _ PREMIER DJUANDA told The were taken t newsmen the arms deal "is smith's Mortuary here. coroner Pond said ef- Making up for lost time, the weatherman today pre- dicted heavy rain for the Southland during the next: five days; shpwefi raised the season's rain total to 1.65 7.inches.under the normal mark for this time of year. Increasing cloudiness is ex- pected tonight, with a 75 per Ice Slick Spreads Across Wide Area iyAsKXUW PW. Millions'- of'rtiidwest motorists and pedestrians slipped' helplessly, today on ice spread by freezing rains. Subzero temperatures gripped the north- east and northern plains and the mercury skidded to freezing as wintry weather belted Southern. California, perjury The case developed from a grand jury investigation of wiretapping and racketeering in Local 299 of the Interna- ional Brotherhood of Team- sters. Collins, 48, is.secretary- treasurer'of the local. Hoffa is president of the local as well as head of the entire day morning. The five-day forecast issued The ice slick extended from Kansas and Nebraska to southern Michigan and north- ern the border between a deep cold air mass this morning by the. Weather and northward pressing warm SLIGHT ERROR Bureau calls for "consider- able amounts of precipitation, with temperatures below nor- mal." MORE SNOW is in sight rain clouds. TRAFFIC WAS snarled and footing treacherous for met- ropolitan workers in the morning rush hours. Hundreds of accidents were reported, the best proof of a greater _____ his wife, her sister, Mrs. Arthur Brown Urges Northwest Power Link SACRAMENTO W) Gov. Brown today proposed a power linkup program with the Pacific Northwest, to buy surplus from the Northwest and meet California's growing Cole, also of New York. THE ROBBERY took place in the Americana Hotel. Dur- ing its opening ceremonies in November 1956, Harry Sita- morc, the notorious "king" of the jewel thieves, was arrest- ed in possession of a pass key which would open any door in the hotel. Sitamore's key was con fiscated but FBI agents said pgp coroner on U. S. confidence in the Indo- forts 'wju continue today to nesian government and of a the man and woman better appreciation of our for- in the Stewart car, eign policy." but he said the job would be He said the arms were Ljifficuit ,jue to the condition scheduled for' early delivery, L{ the bodies, which he de union. Collins was continued it bail pending an appea from the sentence. HIS ATTORNEY, Henry Singer, asked that Collins be placed on probation, calling him "just a clerk who worked hard all his life." "The fact Cashin said to the defendant, "you did say things to the grand jury inings iu me j-.y which the jury found to be from 29 to 31. needs. Brown wrote Gov. Albert D! 'RoseMini of Washington and Gov. Mark Hatfield of Oregon urging an immediate study of the possibility of the plan. He said the Columbia River plants have surplus power and rates may be raised unless a market for it is found. The energy could be used in California for pumping wa- ter in statewide water de- velopments and for indus- tries, Brown proposed. "Increasing population will require more and more in- dustries to furnish industries can be attracted to the West if power rates are kept Brown said. Preliminary studies show that the states could be linked by a transmission line from the Northwest's plants fo Shasta Dam, the governor said. they were considering the possibility that Sund_ay's thief had a copy. Greenbaum told newsmen someone either overlooked or chose not to take some of the gems. (Continued on Pg. A-6, Col. 5) Ike Ends Hunting Vacation in Georgia WASHINGTON (UPI) President Eisenhower re- turned to his White House desk today to face a busy schedule after a quail-shoot- ing holiday in southern Geor- gia. scribed as "the worst I've seen in 10 years of work with the sheriff and the coroner." Fishing Trawler Capsizing at Sea HALIFAX, N.S. UP> The Newfoundland fishing tiawl- Blue Wave was reported for the mountain areas of the with police switchboards Southland. Snow level early and hospital emer- today was feet. A quarter-inch of rain fel on Long Beach Sunday. F.lse where in the Southland, rain fall figures ranged from .03 o an inch at Seal Beach to inch at Dana Point. Temperatures plummete-d early today as the first storm moved on to the south. Many citrus areas reported readings perjurious. There must be a sentence here, and, not a suspended sentence and pro bation. Collins was convicted Jan. 31 of lying when he told the investigating panel that min- utes of two of the local's meetings in 1953 were signed by him shortly afterwards. The government contended they were signed much later, ave was rewiicu nn-j early today in the and intimated alterat.ons SNOW FELL as low as feet Sunday, hitting some of Los Angeles' foothill suburbs. Hail even pelted Southern California beach cities. Many Los Angeles tions were flooded during the Sunday rain. There was a minor mud slide in Benedict Canyon, near the scene of a big brush fire last New Year Eve. gency rooms taxed by boom business in arm fractures from falls on ice. For drivers, the problem was to get any headway at all from spinning wheels even on usually trivial in- clines, and conversely to stop for emergencies on greasy ice once momentum was main- tained. One expressway accident near Detroit involved 30 cars. A trucker steered his heavy semi-trailer rig into a tree deliberately in Atlantic, Iowa, to avoid running down two girls on a sled. Most crashes were minor, but there were some fatalities. Skids killed at least one per- son in Iowa and two in 111 no is. BAN FOLLOWS M-DEATH N. Y. CRASH WHERE TO FIND. IT The mysterious death of a pretty, 30-year-old York cafe society figure is being investigated. Page A-3. Beach B-l. Hal A-15. A-15. C-S to 7. 7. A-12. Death 3-2. A-14. B-S. Shipping A-12. C-l, 2, J. A-18. Tides, TV, C-S. B-4, S. U. S. Restricts Electro Landings NEW YORK Fed- eral Aviation Agency today mposed nationwide restric- ions on bad weather land- ngs by Electra turboprop pas senger planes following the death of 65 persons in an Electra crash last Tuesday. Operated by American Air .ines, the plane crashed into the East River here just be fore midnight while approach ing LaGuardia Field on instru ments. Eight of the 73'persons aboard survived. A spokesman for the gov ernment agency said the re strictions will be in effect "while the investigation i going on as to the cause of he accident The restrictions ire temporay, voluntary on he part of the airlines, and he airlines have accepted the restrictions so that the order s in force now.1 The FAA order forbids a pilot to land an Electra when :he cloud ceiling over an air- port is less than feet and when daytime forward visibility is less than a mile The visibility at night musl be at least two miles. Previously, the minimum were 400 feet and a mile visi jility day or-night. At the ime of the crash the ceiling was 400 feet and visibility wo miles. Under the new restriction, the plane must continue in a 'holding pattern" above an airport until weather im- Broves, or it is sent elsewhere to land. The Electra is manufactured by Lockheed Aircraft During the past month it was placec in service by American and Eastern Airlines. Eleven other lines have the plane on order The Electra is powered b. i our Allison turbine engines The engine is similar to that used in some all-jet aircraft )ut in the Electra the turbine: drive propellers. Lockheed Aircraft official: said they would have no com ment on the order until the) had had a chance to study i further. The FAA said the new re strictions were drawn up in Washington Sunday night In vestigators meanwhile wer closely scrutinizing the in strument panel of the plan which fell into the East Rive IN CHICAGO, slight in lines on the outer drives roved too slickly steep for raffic, and hundreds of driv- ra were held up before salt nd sand spraying equipment made travel possible. The city was even asked by Midway Mrport officials to sand dan .erously slick runways. Arctic air spread over the lortheast during the night with temperatures as low as 34 below zero at Newport VI., and Saranac Lake, N. Y :he upper plains and "Miss- ssippi Valley remained in a subzero grip, with Bismarck and Grand Forks, N. D., re- porting -27 degrees. Weather- Increasing cloudiness tonight with a 75 per cent chance of rain late tonight and T u e s d a y. Maximum temperature by noon today: 62. Ex-Outlaw Jennings Shoots Pal TARZANA Jen- nings, now 95, was demon- strating to an old friend how he used to fan a .45 in the days when he was one of the West's better-known outlaws. "Now back in said Al, "we did it like this." The old revolver roared. The friend, Al Graves, 72, of Santa Clara, Calif., grabbed his right elbow. He had been hit. Graves was taken to a. hospital for treatment, and Jennings, sometimes called the "last of the Old West was left the em- barrassing task of telling police how it had happened.' "I GUESS I miscounted when I unloaded that said Al. He said he thought he had emptied the old revolver's sylinder Sun- day night before showing Graves about ing by cr-cking the hammer back rapidly with the side of the free hand. Jennings, who admitted courj once, to killing three men, cattle stealing, and robbery, was pardoned by Theodore Roosevelt in 1907 while serving time for train robbery. After that he reformed. He now lives in a cottage in Tarzana, in the San Fer- nando Valley. Eisenhower Slates Press Talk Tuesday WASHINGTON dent Eisenhower will hold a news conference Tuesday at a.m. Press Secretary James C. Hagerty said today the ses- sion is being held then be- cause Eisenhower has a busy schedule Wednesday, the usual day for his meetings with newsmen.   

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