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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: February 5, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - February 5, 1959, Long Beach, California                             RUSSIA PUBLICLY CONFRONTED WITH RECORDED EVIDENCE BY U. S. Topes Prove Jets Shot Down Plane, 17 Yanks United States today publicly confronted Russia with evidence that Soviet jets shot down an unarmed transport last September in a warlike attack. possibly 17 American killed.- The evidence was a graphic tape recording of radio conversations between Soviet fighter pilots. VA transcript of this recording was attached to an eight-page summary, issued by the State Depart- ment, of its efforts to pry information about the inci- dent out of Russia. The C130 U.S. transport disappeared Sept. 2 on a flight along the Turkey-Armenia border. Ten days later Russia reported it had crashed in Armenia. The bodies of 6 of the 17 Americans who were in the plane were returned to U.S. officials. JJnder persistent U. S. inquiries, Soviet officials in- sisted they knew nothing about the 11 other Ameri- cans- The summary disclosed that Vice President Nixon and Secretary of State Dulles had pressed Soviet Deputy Premier Anastas I. Mikoyan, on his recent visit here, for information about the missing U. S. airmen. It said, "Mikoyan denied that the plane had been shot down, asserting it had crashed." The department's document also disclosed that Deputy Undersecretary of State Robert Murphy tried to play the recording of the Soviet airmen's conver- sation for Soviet Ambassador Mikhail Menshikov. Menshikov refused to listen, it said, and Murphy then gave him a transcript of the recording in Russian. For the first time, publicly, in today's documents, the United States accused Russia pf shooting down the U. S. plane- Heretofore, publicly, the United States has said only that the plane burned and crashed in Soviet Armenia after being "intercepted" by Soviet fighters. As issued by the State Department, the transcript of conversations between the Soviet fighters had been translated from Russian to English. The record of the Soviet airmen's radio contact was filled with technical chit-chat about altitudes and positions. But the key portions dwelt on an attack. They went like this: sec the target, to the right. "I see the target, a large one "I am see the target, attack! "I am am attacking the target... "Attack, attack, 218, attack "The target is a transport, four-engined "Roger. 201, I am attacking the target "The target is burning. "There's a hit... "The targefis burning, 582 "The target is banking "Open fire ________________ "218, are you attacking? "Yes, yes "The target is burning "The tail assembly is falling off the target... "Look! "Oh? "Look at him, he will not get away, he is already falling. "Yes, he is falling, I will finish him Off, boys, I win finish him off on the run. "The target has lost control, it is going down "The target is falling "Yes form up, go home. "After my third pass, the target started burning "Well, let's form up, follow. Let's go The State Department's summary did not say (Continued on Page A-5, Col. 4.) BUYERS TURN OUT TO BE OFFICERS Pair Arrested for Selling Twins in Texas for The Southland's Finest Evening Neivspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, FEB. Vol. 4 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE it PAGES TELEPHONE HE B-1161 HOME EDITION {Six Editions s RED ZONE IWINS THOMAS (LKFT) AND GEORGE STILLION were "sold" by their parents to Houston officers posing as married couple. Other pictures A-3. HOUSTON (AP) A former airman from Michi- and his British-born tried to sell their 8-year-old twin boys for but the prospective turned out to be juvenile officers investi- gating the strange case. Police Wednesday filed charges against Clark Dean Slillion of Brighton, Mich., and wife, Rosemarie, both 24. wo juvenile officers, posing as married couple, purchased the j complete with bill of sale, ith marked money. Stillion said he had been un- ble to get a job since his re- ase from the Air Force. Both e and his wife were jailed. THE COUPLE was charged pccifically with selling a dnor, a felony. "We were doing it for the ood of the sobbed Irs. Stillion. "It would have orn my heart completely, but would have meant giving the ids a home and the things icy needed." The twins are Thomas James nd George Frederick Lewins, hildren of Mrs. Stillion by a ormer marriage. "We never wanted to leave Thomas told re- wrters. "But Jlommy and 5addy said we had to, that we vould have a better life.'r Detective R. G. Brumley and Mliccwoman Lanny Dixon be- gan an investigation after re- eiving a tip a couple was try- ng to give tile twins away. AT THKIR second meeting vith the Slillions Wednesday he two police officers counted nit S300 and promised to pick up the boys after a trip to the lank to obtain another They said Stillion wrote out (Continued on Page A-3, Col. 8) Ike Asks Stronger j Civil Rights Laws I bi .WASHINGTON President Eisenhower called Ju on Congress, today to strengthen civil rights laws by gf making it. a federal crime to use force or threats force to obstruct court orders in school desegregation g( Plan part of a seven-point gislalive package submitted o Congress, Eisenhower said of Crew proposal would give the overnment "a valuable en- power to deter N. Y. violence and such other cts of violence or threats Inch seek to obstruct court in desegregation cases." NEW YORK   surviving crew by the President in ad- for an answer to the puzzle as a moderate one de- not to raise tempora- caused a big new liner's crush near it may not please either Airport, killing 65 of the segregationists or liberals of both But both the crewmen, in all respects. package provides: copilot and the flight investigative power injured and the FBI in crimes involving be -questioned at present; or attempted de- pilot was of schools or cburches. One big question to be would make a fed- twered was whether the offense of flight from one beam for to another to avoid de- guidance of the plane had or prosecution. bearing on the The American Airlines for the at- coming in from the general to inspect fed through an overcast after election records and re- nonstop flight from the preservation of such had the aid of a radio which lined its approach on Page A-5, Col. 1.) the runway designated for landing. Execute AX ALTITUDE BEAM which tells planes whether More in Cuba approaching too high or HAVANA Revolutionary Is in use on the squads executed three for those landing early today at La Cabana for war crimes. JrCpnKmted on Page A-5, CoL was Walter Sentiestcban ROK Vessel 22, a former rebel soldier condemned by a rebel war Japan Fish in Orienle Province late last year for killing two chil- NAGASAKI, Japan v South Korean gunboat two others executed were day fired on nine Japanese for Col. Esteban irig boats and captured one President Fulgencio police chief. They were Police said the 5-ton of killings and tor- hisa-Maru and its crew of were seized only four unofficial total of ex- from the northern coast for war crimes now Japan's Tsushima at 274. Flier, 4 GIs Imprisoned Many Weeks Red Cross Talks Result in Release by Red Germany HERLESHAUSEN, Ger- many (AP) Communist East Germany today re- leased U. S. Army pilot Richard Mackin and four other American soldiers held in East Germany for several weeks. MACKIN, .a 27-year-old lieutenant from Washington, D. C.r- parachuted into East DEATH THREAT CHARGED Court Bars Calif. Mother From Rich Sons Nuptials Germany Dec. 3 after he got ost and his small plane ran out of gas. The other four soldiers were Pvt. Elwin Bell of Hill City, Kan., Sp. Kenneth G. Carlson of San Leandro, Calif., Pvt. James W. Hayes, of Baltimore, and Pvt. Melvyn Hampton (hometown THE FOUR disappeared In Berlin during November and December last year. The release, of the American soldiers was negotiated be- tween the American Hod Cross and the -E. German Red Cross after the U. S. State Depart- ment stuck to its policy of re- fusing to negotiate with the East German regime. The five crossed into West Germany at this frontier post on the border of Communist East Germany shortly after noon. Mackin looked pale. lie wore Army fatigues and a felt cap. He said he felt fine. RELEASE OF the men fol- owed by less than a day the rceing of a U.S. Army convoy eld by the Russians at the farienborn checkpoint for more than 50 hours. The cases of Mackin and the our enlisted men had hung ire for weeks. Robert Storey Vilson, European director oi he American Red Cross, went o East Berlin earlier this week o negotiate the release. "I am sorry I cannot give u any details at this Vilson told newsmen. The five were met at the rentier by other American Red officials and a large jroup of officers from U.S. 'th Army hcadquraters. The group left in one Red Cross car and four Army sedans for Frankfurt, LOUIS E. PUKMORT, 34, and bride-to-be, Mrs. Barbara Jean Thorndike, 26 tell newsmen why he obtained a court order barring his mother from wedding. W. Berlin's Mayor Off for U. S., Canada LONDON Berlin Mayor Willy Brandt took of by jet-liner for Canada and (hi United Stales today. Brandt and his wife were t make a brief stop in New York then fly on to Otlawa. He T lo Washinglon on Salurday anc will spend a little more than week in the United States, One of Brandt's aims i America is to explain the So viet threat to the divided city f i f Soviet Chief 'Guarantees' Berlin Entry 'We'll Admit West Cold War Victory to End He Says MOSCOW Khrushchev, urging an end :o the Cold War, today of- fered Soviet guarantees of western, access to West 3erlin if his plan for settling Jie crisis is accepted. The Western powers so far have declined lo consider the plan, which calls for making West Berlin a United Nations responsibility. Addressing himself to Secre- tary of State Dulles, Khrush- chev remarked "Mr. Dulles, if you so desire, then for the sake of ending the Cold War we are even prepared to admit your victory in this war that is un- wanted by the peoples. "Regard yourselves, gentle- men, as victors in this war, but end it Quickly." THE' SOVIET LEADER was addressing the closing session of the 21st Communist Party Congress. To applause, Khrushchev in his final address coupled new warnings to the United States with an invitation to President Eisenhower to visit the Soviet Denmark to Pay AN in Sinking COPENHAGEN Danish government will fool the entire bill for the loss ol the passenger-freighter Hans Hedtoft and will pay compen- sation to relatives of the 95 passengers and crewmen who apparently went down with the ship off Greenland last week. The Royal Trading Co., a government company which owned the two-million-dollar ship, said it was not covered by outside insurance. LOS ANGELES A wealthy Pasadena manufacturer has obtained court order that prohibits his mother from attending his marriage next to Visit in suburban San Marino. Louis E. Purmort, got (AP) Prime Minister Harold injunction after telling accepted an invitation to visit Russia court that his mother, 21. Macmillan will be accompanied by Tessie Purmort, 68, told Selwyn Lloyd and will stay 7 to 10 she would kill him rather Radio broadcast see him marry Mrs. Minister's acceptance meeting with Macmillan Stanley Thorndiko, a divorcee. Mrs. Purmort is the wife ol George Purmort, 68, invitation simultaneous wilh an official announcement the second in 12 hours developed an outline for talks be- Milwaukee construction Macmillan and Premier announcements Khrushchev. icer, minutes after the included Allied thinking on THE SON informed the from the British possible reduction of military that his mother wrote his lawyer, blaming the 26-year-old Mrs. Thorndike for breaking Secretary of State Dulles for Paris following two days of talks with Macmillan and in Germany and on the establishment of a system to lis first marriage. .The leaders on this reduction, newsmen Decame final last- including West told. "I would rather see you and German British Prime Minister's than married to Purmort quoted his mother. "II you go ahead and get MET Macmillan at noon after an hour-long has the approval of both Dulles and President Eisen in church, I'm going to reliable sources said there and stop this was the concluding was reported t Superior Judge a series of talks on assured Dulles that he ha Meyer ordered Mrs. Purmort issues that Dulles intention of making an stay away from the in London since he agreement wit from the wedding reception from Washington the going-away party. was moving swiftly t couple will leave for conference broke up a Big Four foreign min on their before Dulles' conference with the So for Paris, where he before May 27, the targe further djscussions on the German questions initially set by the Rus sians for them (o give the Eas Communist r e g i m I Low clouds and will fly to Bonn at of Allied supply line fog tonight and of the week for West Berlin, Friday, but with West German Big Four conference is ex clear and sunny. Konrad Adenauer to be one of the pro r change in on which Macmilla 4 Maximum sound out the Soviet lead Union. The Soviet premier said Eis- 'nhower could bring anyone chose and go anywhere. lie said the visit should prove use- ful.. This invitation came after :he premier repeated his warn- ing that the Soviet Union "now has the means to deliver a blow to aggressors in any part of the world." But Khrushchev expressed confidence the Soviet Union could avoid war and defeat the West in peaceful competition. economic TURNING TO Berlin, major point of East-West tension, Khrushchev again presented a formula he advanced Nov. a separate demilitarized West Berlin under U. N. auspices. West Berlin, though 110 miles from West Germany proper, is (Continued on Page A-5, Col. 2) WHERE TO FIND IT Photographer's wife booked as accomplice in his murder. Story on page A-6. to by noon today: 65. INFORMED SOURCES said en in Moscow, Beach B-l. Hal B-ll. B-ll. C-6 to 11. C-t, 5. C-6. Death Page B-2. B-10. B-3. Shipping C-6. C-l, 2, 3, 4. B-8. Tides, TV, C-12. Vital C-8. B-ll. B-i, S. your A-2.   

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