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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: January 26, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - January 26, 1959, Long Beach, California                             RAID SHUTS ROSARITO BEACH FBI SETS MQTEU TRAP 73 Yanks fosse Captures 10 B- Desperado and Girl Friend Federal Action Squelches Rumors Betting to Be OKd ROSARITO BEACH, Mexico Mexi- can government's premised crackdown on gambling by Americans south of the border came today with a raid on a casino here. Federal judicial police, sup ported by GO soldiers, closed the Club I-alino American, which had operated since last summer under the guise of a private club. They arrested 66 American men, seven American women and 10 Mexican citizens and] seized an estimated in American money. They also seized five black jack two poker tables and six- dice tables, which .they said they found in operation. Those ar- rested were patrons and cash iers of the club, the raiding offi cers said. THE GOVERNMENT had announced in Mexico City scv eral limes, in response to pealed rumors that American gamblers were going to start operations at various places south of the border, that no permits would be granted. Today's raid closed the only place known lo be in opera lion. It had no permit. Those arrested included Felipe Arcc, 1 cashier, and two American brothers, Tony and John Neals ot Hollywood, described by of- ficers as assistant cashiers, CLUB in Tijuana had been fitted out with equip ment shipped from Las Vegas fjcv., and rumors had said it was to open last Jan. 1. I never opened. There had been oilier rumors of gambling plan by Americans at Nogales Mexicali, and Euscnada, all o or near the border. Those arrested were to be taken before a federal judg at Tijuana, ou the_bordcr. Ho arito Beach is 18 miles sou of the border. 'The club whic was closed is near the Rosari Beach Hotel, a resort patron Ized largely by Americans. THE KA1B started at 11: Sunday night and was disclos at 2 a.m. today. Those arrest- ed were being held at the club pending their court appearance. The club was reported op- erated by a Mexican corpora- tion, in which Americans were reported interested, which had a permit lo establish tourist re- sorts in Mexico. The Southland's Finctt Evening Newpaper LONG BKAOH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, JANUARY Vol. LXXI-No. 310 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HEJ-6959 SO PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1181 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily] Fire Slayer Loses Plea to Tribunal Doomed LA. Man Denied Hearing on 6-Death Case WASHINGTON (AP) The Suprerne Court today denied a hearing to Manuel Joe Chavez, who is under death sentence in California for setting a fire that fa- tally burned six persons in a Los Angeles bar. The court announced it would not hear the case but did not give its reasons. Chavez and several olher men were thrown out of the bar, called the Mecca, on April 4, 1957. Fighting ensued and wl-FACED George Albert Scott, 37, wanted in the slaying of a movie executive, is pictured in Tex- arkana, Tex., jail Sunday after he and a woman comnanion were captured in a gun Shotgun-murder suspect George Albert Scott of Long Beach and his girl the gasoline on the floor tossed matches on it. As the fire flashed IhroUEh- nrtinfr New Jersey State Teachers College, holds twins Joanne arm A while his wifef Pat, 23, holds the latest double Patricia IcteTMber" wcrkka fuU shift a, maclnne operator at a bo e: cap As the fire flashed Inrougn- Michael. AllDeru WUFKS a iuu o.-> out the interior of plant T put in a third trick helping out at home. (AP Wncphoto.) Brown Due to Seek Levy on Cigarettes Natural Income Tax Hike May Be Targets By MOHRIE LANDSBEUG SACRAMENTO iGov. Brown's tax program I is expected to call for two new levies on cigarettes and natural an increase in state income tax raits. Califoruians will find out Wednesday exactly how much Brown proposes to boost taxes in order (o lifl the state treasury oul of Hie red. That's when he submits his firsl slate budget to the Legislature. The slate government is now spending close to 100 million dollars a year more than it takes In. It has managed for a number of years by using re- serves. Most of these are gone, and Brown lias indicated the budget can't be cut enough to the .six persons were fatally burned. CHAVEZ, Clyde Dates and Manuol Hernandez were con- victed of murder by arson.] Bates and. Chavez were sen- ___ tenced to death; Hernandez got friend, a beefy woman life imprisonment. The appeal '----J acted on today affected only Chavez. He asked a high court review of his case after the California Supreme Court on Sept. 19, 1958, affirmed his Strike Shuts Down Filipino Airline MANILA W About employes of Philippine Air- lines (PAL) struck today for more money and union recog-! nitiqn. The walkout forced can- cellation of flights to most of the 68 points the line serves in the Philippines. Unless a settlement is reached quickly, there are fears the strike may affect six international airlines -whose op- erations in the Philippines arc France, Trans World, KLM, ing it. "'BARBARA WHITE Shy Ex-Wrestler Ala. Judge Acquitted in Rights Case MONTGOMERY, Ala. UP) Ex-Judge George W. Wallace was acquitted of a contempt-of- court charge today by a federa wrestler, were captured Sunday after a gun battle with police in Texarkana, Ark Scolt, 37, an ex-convict and mental patient who lived at 56 S. Daisy Ave., had beep sought since the Dec. 30 slaying of .a Hollywood movie executive. The fugitive and Barbara g White, 36, Phoenix, were trapped in a motel cabin by a posse of officers, including FBI officers. IGNORING A DEMAND that he surrender, Scott opened fire on the posse. Officers then raked the cabin with shotgun pellets arid ma- chin e g u n five. They also pumped 15 tear gas shells into the room. The woman came out first, .wearing a' bathrobe. Scott fol- lowed, wearing only a pair of pants. "All he did at first was lo cuss us a sheriff's deputy said. Neither suspect was hurl in War Mutiny Opens Monumental Flood Cleanup Job Begins Chavez questioned in the appeal whether, California penal code 'definition .of arson violates due process of law be- cause of asserted vagueness and because it prescribes cruel and unusual punishment. The appeal also contended there was an Three Americans accused conspjring to obstruct the Korean War effort and incite mutiny among U.S. forces went on trial here today. Floods still menaced some areas in five eastern and central states today but waters from swollen nyers and receding in most sections. The worst of eared temporarily ended. The chief problem for the (thousands hit by last week's make up the difference. While the administration has kept its tax program under wraps, speculation centers, on these potential money-raisers: 1, Cigarettes. California Is one of six states that doesn't tax tobacco products. A 3-cent tax on cigarettes would bring In an estimated 60 million dol- lars a year. Former Clov. Earl Warren recommended a 2-cent cigar (Continued on Page A-6, Col. 6) TO, court cnargc loaay uy icucmi judge who said he complied hung up erations in the Philippines arc vith a court order while trying called scott but "T LL W3S dCfy' Placed Car Chase Just Like in Old Movies SAN FRANCISCO "Pi Remember Ihose old silent- screen, cop-chasing comedies? When the "lizzies" swing about crazily and just got across the track before the train roared by? You'd have thought you were seeing one again Sunday KBI AGENTS caUed pursued car suddenly went into reverse. So did the po- lice patrol It ended, police said, when Ihe chased car came at the patrol car broadside, pinning the gun battle, but both were violently ill from the gas. Attcmpls to get Scott to sur- render peacefully provided some moments of tense, raw In the first such sedition trial emerging' frorh a war which Congress never declared, he government and defense egan picking a to try the hree associated with publica- on of a magazine in Shanghai They were accused, among ther things, of charging in he magazine lhat the United Slates waged germ warfare ii Korea. THE DEFENDANTS are John W, Powell, 39, his wife Sylvia, 39, both of San Fran Cisco, anil Julian Schuman, 38 ot New York. Witnesses subpoenaed includ Gen. Matthew Ridgway an Gen. Mark Clark, who serve' as commanders in Korea, an Gen Omar Bradley; Randolp Chase Gould of Mill Vallej Calif., former editor of th Shanghai Evening. Post-Me cury, and Julian J. Thomson, o rama. Hollywood Blvd. Scene of Slaying my ine WILII HOLLYWOOD f0rcec; temporarily from their on Hollywood Blvd. left one homes. man dead, a police officer wounded and touched o f f from Ihe central plains manhunt lhat Quickly" rounded across the northern half of the p two ex-convicts today. country, adding to the incon- The action started at venicnce of Hood victims, a.m. when Policeman Adam Safian 40 walking his beat, IN OHIO, one of the slates entered a 'liquor store at hardest hit by overflows, the Hollywood Blvd. Calistoga, Calif. Shangh motel office i give up, but devastating floods Pennsylvania, New York, West (Virginia and Indiana was the huge cleanup job. The Hed Cross has estimated more than families were affected elle tax in 1953, and almost got it through. His successor; Good- win Knight', tried for a 3-cent tax in 1955. Both rneh warned then that the state was heading Ohio, ror trouble; 2. Severance lax. This an Impost on the extraction of nat- ural resources In California, mainly oil, gas and timber. The stale now earns about 11 by the Hoods, with thousands million dollars a year on tide- air, with snow or rain, Ohio River was the last of the OllyWUUU Olvu. The clerk I-eland Brouse, 50, state's watenvays threatening vho was being held up at the further flooding. At Cmcin- time, shouted a warning: nati Ihe big river edged up to look out for this guy." 55 feet, 3 feet above flood With this the orliccr whirled stage. The Wealhcr Bureau and was shot in the shoulder, predicted an But he opened fire as the ban- crest will be reached near dit fled was driven away night tonight. However, only in a car. The clerk, framed in minor damage was expected un- the door of his store, was shot three limes and killed by the (Continued on Page A-6, Col. 3) of severance taxes in :andirmvian Airlines, Civil Air ransport and S. Dist. Judge Frank M. ohnson Jr., who could have cut Wallace to jail for 45 days or longer, held lhat the former Manama judge actually cooperated with the U. S. Civ lights Commission in makin voter registration records aval able in Harbour and Bulloc counties. JOHNSON SAID in a writte decree lhat Wallace "altemptc to give the impression that he defying this court's order" by turning the records over to grand juries -in ihc two coun tics instead of giving thcim tc civil richts heard his voice in the background say: "They've got us surrounded. We might as well commit suicide. Do you want me lo shoot you first or would you rather shoot me and then shoot THE CONVERSATION was broken off as tear-gas bombs shattered the windows and seconds later the woman rushed to safety. Scott had been hunted since Dec. 30 when he was door'KSa.nst the leg of officer Don -Sweeney. TUB POLICE BOOKED Ralph L. Creswell, 22, a shipping clerk for (catch your breath and here we Assault with a deadly weapon his resisting arrest; peeding; reckless driving; ailure to heed a red light nd siren; driving without a iccnse; going through an rterial stop; driving-without ghts; driving with a re-oked license; and driving vith an improper registration. reighter Sinks, Sailors Missing TARANTO, Italy The 10-lon Kalian freighter Laura abrielia sank loday in heavy cas between this south Italiai ort and the Greek island o laxos. Eight of its crew are nissing. The vessel, which operated ctwecn Italy and other Medi-crranean countries, carried a rew of 16. The French tanker reported picking up 8 on Page A-8, Col. banker who was a prisoner o the Chinese for five years. Powell published a magazin in postwar Shanghai, the Chii Monthly Review. He kept going after the Chinese com- munists came to pawcr, with his wife and Schuman as asso- ciate editors. All three re- urned to the United States in 955 after the magazine folded. t THEY ARE CHAKGED un- fleeing bandit. WHERETO FIND IT area was blanketed by officers First of a series of 12 articles who soon nabbed two ex-con- to assjst Press-Telegram read- victs and booked them on sus- en preparation of their in- plcion of murder. They were conie tax returns appears today .dcntified as Walter R. Demcs, on page A-5. 47, and Vernon C.- Kcrfool, 45, who met while they were serv- Bcacli B-l. ing lime in Folsom Prison. na[ A-ll. Officers said Ihey wo re A-ll. picked up near an abandoned C-5 to 9. land oil and gas leases. A 5 per cent severance tax on petroleum products and 7 per cent on gas would bring In ap- proximately BO million dollars': a 5 per cent rote on limber and other minerals would be good for some 28 million more. Recent studies submitted to the Legislature show that oil- rich Texas got 180 million out 1956, FATHER OF 3 KILLED FIGHTING FLAMES Docker Admits Sneak Cigarette Started 17-Hour Fatal Ship Fire COPENHAGEN Danish dockworker pleaded guilty to sneaking a for- bidden cigarette which touched off a 17-hour fire on the nitrale-laden Swedish ship Chile. A 37-year-old of three killed as he fought the fire in its early hours Sunday night. His body was found In a fold this morning. The fire in the ship's cargo was reported out about noon loday. Damage was eslimatcd at several million kroner, a kroner being worth 14.5 cents. The crew escaped unhurt. Dockworkcr Bent Christcnscn was arrcst- efl Sunday night, two hours after the fire started. He told a court today that he had violated a ban against smoking in the holds by puffing on a cigarette "for just a few then extinguished it by pressing i against a bag filled with nitre. Within sec onds the bag was afire. Christensen himsel fought the fire, but eventually had to leav the hold with live other workers. He pleaded guilty to causing the fir through negligence, for which he can be fined or jailed for up to two years. He re served his pica on another charge o "endangering the health and lives of olhers through which could draw maximum prison term of four years. Christensen was released io await tria der the Sedition Act of 1917 car that had a bullet crease in B-B, 7. with conspiring to obstruct the the roof. Delcctivcs said keys B-6. war effort and incite mutiny to the car were found in ncnth B-Z among U. S. forces by circular-Demes' pocket. ing copies of the magazine'in' the United States. crnmeht says the The gov- conspiracy consisted of publishing charges Weather- consisted or lhat Ihe United States waged Parlly cloudy lomgnt germ warfare and obstructed anr] mostly sunny Tues- truce negotiations. This was flay. Slightly warmer. conspiracy, says the govern- jj ax jmum temperature ment, because Ihe defendants 67. knew the reports to be false. I A-10. B-3. Shipping C-5. C-l, 2, 3- C-4. Tides, TV, C-10. A-ll. B-l, 5. Your A-Z. Louisiana over 70 million and Oklahoma over 30 million 3. Income tuxes. themselves may not think so, but experts consider Califor- nia's personal income tax to be realtively mild. The present rates run from 1 per cent In the bracket to 6 per cent ovur Ex- emptions include for a married couple, for a single person, and 5400 for each dependent. These are among the highest in the nation. An increase in rates by 1 per cnt in each bracket would real- million dollars. A 1 per (Continued on Page A-6, Col. 7) Fire Demolishes N.Y. Knitting Mill SENECA FALLS, N. Y. Wl feeding on tons of wool demolished a knitting mill today while firemen struggled with frozen hydrants and lack of water. The Seneca knitting mill, a three-story brick structure with an adjacent one-story warehouse, was a total loss. Damage was put at two mil- Illon dollars'. ITHREE RJFLE SHOTS FROM WINDOW fioy Kills Father Over Reprimand for Not Sweeping Snow Off Walk JOHN W. POWELL, magazine publisher in postwar Shanghai, and his wife, Sylvia, are two of three de- fendants whose sedition trial opened DULUTH, Minn. Peterson, 35 fatally wounded his father, Carl, at their homo here Sunday night because Ihe father had reprimanded the boy for not sweeping enow from Iheir sidewalk. Peterson was shot three times with a high- powered rifle as he swept the snow from the walk, the job to whidi the boy had been assigned- Police said (he boy, upon hearing his father had not died instantly, said, "I'm sorry, I should have done a better job." Authorities said the father came home about p.m. Sunday and gave the boy a tongue-lashing for not having done'the IwuiO- hold chore. He then went outside to do the job himself. Reynold went to an upstairs bedroom, where he loaded a deer rifle. He fired at hi3 father from the bedroom window. The f.rst bullet hit Peterson in Ihe ankle, nearly sev- ering it; the second grazed his chest as he fell to the sidewalk and Ihe third punctured the chest. The boy lold his mother lo call police- She was too excited lo dial, so the boy called himself and told Ihcm what ho had When police arrived, Peterson told them he had slipped on Ihe ice and Peterson was given 12 pints of blood plasma at St. Luke's Hospital in a desperate attempt lo save his life.   

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