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Press Telegram: Saturday, January 10, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - January 10, 1959, Long Beach, California                               IMKOYAN GHS PUNE BOMB THREAT The Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY Vol. LXXI-No. 297 P RIC E 10 0 E N IS CLASSIFIED HEZ-595. 18 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Court Rules Integration of Georgia State Co Hunt Widens fbrFa Two mily's Captors Fled Police Gunfire Linked to L. B'. Job Two youthful gunmen who held a family hostage six hours in Anaheim and then slipped through a po- lice blockade were still at large today. Police believe the two des- pteradocs also were the trigger rteit in a drugstore holdup in IxmE-Beach several hours earli- er "Thursday. search for the pair sprea'd through the Southland alter-it became clear they had escaped from 300 police officers making a house-to-house search through a square-mile' section of Anaheim. Officers were called in from a dozen neighboring communi- ties'when the two.youths van- ished night after a gun fight with a policemen who .tried to arrest them for a liquor store holdup in Anaheim. MEANWHILE, TWO other young men have been identified as having been seen in the drug- store at 4th St. and Cherry Ave. just after the shooting there. Police believe they are members of the gang that pulled both holdups: At a police lineup, Marlene 21, a clerk in the Long drugstore, named Her- beft M. Frizell Jr., 20, of 2918 Pacific Ave., and LeRoy E. Do'sse'y, 19, of 1215 Orange as having been in the store. Miss Hair was shot in the left foot during the holdup Frizell and Dossey admitted Fresh Order Delivered to LittleRock Atlanta Retains Bus Segregation Despite New Edict By federal Flies for S. F.1" After Strong Precautions 'Hungarian' Calls Airline Prior to Chicago Takeoff CHICAGO (UPI) Soviet Deputy Premier Anastas Mikoyan took off today fot- San Francisco on a United Air. Lines plane from an airport bristling with .police .and detectives after a telephoned bomb threat on the Russian of- ficial's life, The plane was air borne at noon. The threat was made by man who spoke in broken Eng- lish and identiied .himself as "a Hungarian." He told Harry Oilman, an airline official: "That flight that Mikoyan is to take from the airport will never leave the ground. It will blow up first." MIKOYAN and his party, In eluding Soviet Ambassador to the United States Mikhail A Menshikov, originally were to have boarded a plane which left for Boston this morning. But a change from the Boston-Chi- cago plane to a fresh one was made here, and eight passen- gers who' came on the flight from the East, were trans ferred. court today ordered one of the' largest tate-sponsored, all-white colleges in Georgia to ad- mit qualified Negroes. The school ruling, which could affect all of the other passengers, in- cluding the Russian party, Fifty FIRST ATOM MISSILE SUB LAUNCHED The Halibut, first nuclear-powered submarine designed to fire guided mis- siles and the biffisst.built'ar.Miire'-Island, Shipyards, slips..into Mare Friday after'.'lauhching ceremonies: The new vessel will fire 'Regulus'I missiles, Which fly atrthe speed of sound, carry nuclear warheads. The Halibut's skipper is Lt. Comdr. Walter Dedrick of Long .Beach, .son of Mr. and Mrs. Warren A. Livingston Wirephpto) Georgia University system, came just one day after another federal judge had leld that segregated seat- ing on Atlanta's buses is llegal. In .Little Rock, Ark., meanwhile, the school board was ordered to pro- ceed with integration of the high, schools which have been closed. since Sept. 12 1958. U. "S, District Ju'dg Boyd Sloan, struck down one o the -key requirements for ad mission i; which. has kept Negr applicants from gaining trance to Ceorgia'E white col- leges. He heid that the re- quirement calling for signa- tures of two or three alumni "is invalid as applied to. Ne- groes because there are no Ne- gro .alumni." The ruling came .in the case of three Negroes seeking to en- boarded the substituted plane at Chicago. Members of the Chicago bomb squad made a thorough search of all personal luggage put aboard. Checks of planes are routine in all bomb threats, but FREED AFTER 3 J YEARS Free'after "serving 31 years of a life sentence for murder of four railroad employes in a 1923 train; robbery, Hugh d'Autvemont walks from Salem, Ore., penitentiary Friday.. His two brothers in- volved in the robbery are still-behind (Continued on Page A-3, Col. 4) Cars Jump Tracks, Hit Mail Train STAMFORD, Conn. on Page A-3, Col. 7) PARKING BOOM 2 "Borrow1 State's Lot and Cash In BOSTON (UPI) Police 'admitted today they were jvithout clues to the identi- ties "ofi two men who "bor- rowed" a State Public Works Department storage yard near Boston Garden to run a profitable parking lot. The bold con men "opened" their lot Sunday night and accommodated, at 51.50 per car, about 200 motorists who were going to the Icecapades at the Garden just 100 yards away. Business was fine, and the men, equipped with the flashlight-badge of the park- ing' lot jockey, smashed pad- locks on gates surrounding 1 ihe" lot again Wednesday and Thursday nights as swarmed into the area for an ice hockey game and the Jcecapades again. t POLICE WHO noticed the illegal parking thought the gates were left open by state employes and motorists had merely taken advantage ol the situation. The state em- 1 ployes, unaware their yarc had been used the previous nights, believed the locks were broken by vandals. No one spotted the enter prising businessmen, exccp to notice there were two o them. The state said Friday nigh the gates have now beer welded shut. "We'd like to talk to th the police said New, Giant Rivals Back Castro; Carrier Joins Fleet NEW YORK proud name rejoined the U. S. Navy's lists today as the nation's newest aircraft carrier was commissioned New York Naval Shipyard. The leviathan, as tall as a 25-story building, was ill at a cost of 190 million liars and launched last June, fifth warship to bear the me, she is oceans apart from revolutionary war oop of 10 guns. The name "Independence" be- me synonomous with gal- ntry and glory during World ar II. The carrier .of that ame compiled a brilliant com- at record and in two years on-cight battle stars-. r THE NEW Independence was elivercd officially to Rear djrn. Chester C. Wood, com- andant of the 3rd Naval Dis- rict, by Rear Adm. Schuylcr Pyre, commander of the hipyard. Then Capt. Rhodam Y. Mc- Iroy Jr., 44-year-old native of Lebanon, Ky., took command. Adm. Arleigh A. Burke, chief f naval operations, was the top ilitary official participating in be commissioning ceremony, The new carrier has space or 100 aircraft, including jets hat'can deliver atomic bombs, nd will have 140 pilots as- ighed. Her crew will number about they can expect to ive in modern Navy comfort. Berthing areas have pastel -een walls and soft-colored inoleum-tile floors. Each Pull- man-type bunk is illuminated by individual fluorescent lights and each crew member has his own ventilation and air condl tiorjing control. The ship's rest rooms include Threat of Split Eases HAVANA rival rebel units swore loyalty to Fidel Castro to.day, apparently heading off a threat- of serious quarrels within the revolutionary movement. ter Georgia State College of Business Administration in At- lanta. The school has some students, and' ranks in size just behind the University of Georgia, Athens, and Gcor- (Continued on Page A-3, Col. 1.) Girl Beaten to Death by Intruder MINNEAPOLIS A 12- year-old girl was savagely slugged to death and two younger girls were left criti- cally wounded today by an assailant who invaded their southside home. Within two hours police ar. rested a man who Detective In- pcctor Charles Wetherillc said was identified as the attacker by one of 'the girls and a 15- year-old baby sitter. Held without charge was Glenn R. Holscher, 25, Minne- apolis, a commercial artist. Holscher denied any knowledge of the attacks. KILLED WAS Patricia Gross, She died in a hospital nearly three hours after the healing, apparently inflicted by a gun. Hospitalized in critical condi- tion with skull fracture were Patricia's sister, Colleen, 8, and Beiilah Gully, 7, the daughter of a woman friend of the Gross children's mother, Mrs. Irene Gross, a divorcee. The two are the student- backed revolutionary director- ate and t h e Second National Front of Escambray. Both had complained of lack of represen- tation in the new provisional government. Castro, whose 26th of July movement spearheaded the drive that finally toppled dic- tator Fulgencio Batista, had accused the directorate of seiz- ing h u g e arms stores and warned: "WHOEVER DOES anything that places the revolution in Several Earthquakes Felt in El Salvador SAN SALVADOR, El Selva About 15 cars of, a 76-car freight train derailed today, jack-knifed against an empty mail train on another track'ahd disrupting service on the New Haven Railroad's main line. No one was injured in the pre-dawn accident. The mail'train's'rear the only'passenger demolished. The normal" occu- pants of the conductor and flagman escaped almost certain death by riding in the ngine because the coach had a efective' heater. Four freight cars plunged off "bridge into, an eserted at the to he adjacent Connecticut turn- pike. Russia Proposes 28-Nation Parley on German Pact MOSCOW. Russia proposed in notes to the Western Big Three and 24 other nations today the' convocation of a German peace conference in Prague 'or Warsaw within two months. the notes' went'a'25-pag'e" proposed peace treaty which would Berlin an unarmed free _ _.L_H tlfa city until such time as the two Germanys are united. dor tremors have been felt in the central and western part of th country since Friday. No cas ualties or property damage were reported. (Continued on Page A-3, Col. 2) WHERE TO FIND IT A-4, 5. B-2 (o 8. A-6, A-10. B-2. B-2. Shipping B-Z, A-7, 8, 9. A-2. Tides, TV, A-10. CARS ON BOTH trains burst nto flames, shooting up heavy )lack, acrid smoke over the mUd earth downtown area. It look fire UP> Several mild earm men> taulmg the Haze from 85 The proposed draft treaty was similar to.that offered by former Foreign Minister .V. M, Molotov five years ago, and in- cluded provisions which the Vcstcrn powers previously ave rejected. AMONG THE proposals were 1) Germany, be. prohibited rom joining any' military bloc vhich does riot.include-all sig- natory nations all for- eign troops pull out of Germany vithin one year. Other sections would prohibit foot aerial ladders angling above the tracks, about tw lours to bring it under control. The mail train was number 93, making a Boston to New York run. It was moving very slowly and just about to stop at the station when the freight cars on the next track whipped into it. The freight, M-7 was heading to- ward New York at about 50 m.p.h. from Worcester, Mass., when the derailment occurred, a few hundred yards east of the station. All four tracks were blocked completely. 15-Year-Old Mother Has Triplet Sons SAN ANTONIO, Tex. (UPI) -boys, born Thursday to a 15-year-old'mother, were reported in "critical" condition oday at Robert B. Green Hos- pital. Mrs. Ramona' Agueros', a grade'school student until last German possession of nuclear year, gave birth to triplet sons while attended only by a mid wife. The babies, two months pre mature, were rushed to the hos pital where they are isolated in incubators. THE HOSPITAL listed the infants as Frank Jr., weight three pounds, three ounces; Komon, weight three pounds, two ounces; and Fernando, weight two pounds, 15 ounces. The boys were horn within 10 minutes. Mrs. T. dc la Vega, the mid- ,vife, said she delivered the: known as the baby without excitement. The arrival o'C the second'got her a little excited and when the third boy came she called fire and police departments. The boys' father .is' Frank Agueros, 18, who is unem- ployed. some powder ladies. rooms for the President and Mamie at Mountain Retreat THURMONT, -Md. President and Mrs. Eisenhower today were in the midst of an abbreviated weekend at Camp David, the White House retreat in the Catoctin Mountains ft Maryland. weapons, rockets and subma- rines, and German claims to eastern territories now occu- pied by Poland. The draft provided that the peace treaty would be signed both by East and West Ger- many, and by a new confeder- ation of the two Germanys. It suggested that Red China should participate in the peace conference. i THE NOTE went to all coun- tries that participated in World War II against Hitler's forces. The Soviet notes were in re- ply' to Western rejections of an earlier Soviet note..The note of Nov. 27 had proposed that :ho United States, Britain 'and prance pull their troops out of West Berlin, leaving it an un- armed free cily. In similar Western rejections, the three nations suggested that a Big Four conference be called to consider the whole German problem, including .re- unification. NO SALE Kansan Dials Local Store, Gets Alaska SAL1JJA, Kan.' Duckers heard a click on the telephone as he dialed the number of a Salina clothing store. A voice but it wasn't at the store. After an exchange of ques- tions. Duckers learned he was talking to a man in Fair- banks, 'Alaska, The telephone company said something had gone wrong in the complicated new long-dis- tance dialing system._______ Weather- Variable cloudiness and occasional sprinkles to- night and Sunday. Little temperature change.- "f, V>   

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