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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: January 7, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - January 7, 1959, Long Beach, California                               Buried Worker Saved Prom Cesspool Ordeal STRIFE-HIT CONGRESS LAUNCHES '59 SESSION A BUCKET OF SAND is hauled up from 24-foot-deep hole in which Leslie Stafford, 40, was trapped in Bakersfield for hours before being rescued. Metal casing was placed over hole to prevent further cave-in during rescue. I Car Liability Insurance Up by Pet. Long Beach area motor- ists will pay 10V4 per cent more for automobile liabil- ity insurance due-to rising costs of traffic accidents. The higher rates will cost car owners1 here 57. to a for standard mini- mum liability- coverage, ac- cording to Jack Hammond, president of the Ixrng Beach Insurance Assn. Orange County rates' are unchanged, however. New rates in most sections of 'Ihc Beach-Los Angeles metropolitan area 'on basic lia- bjlity coverage of for BAKERSFIELD A workman trapped1 for more than 12 hours at the bottom of a collapsed cess- )ool was rescued today. A heavy crane finally-jerked oose a metal casing pinning Leslie O. Stafford's foot at the of the 24-foot hole and he pulled himself free. Stafford, who up Until then had spent eight agonizing hours trying to free himself, was rushed to a hospital. His res- cuers said he appeared to be in excellent condition. Because of the close quarters and the ganger .of shifting sand, no one could reach Stafford's foot. He had to do the work of freeing his foot alone. Pickets Out for Mikoyan in Cleveland HE with a bodily injury and property damage: for 4-An increase of ?7 a year for a nonbusiness tamily car with no! young male operators. New rate 573. increase of ?'i2 a year for cars; owned or principally operated by men under the ago HAMMOND SAID national underwriters have raised liabil- ity fates for virtually all Call fprnia motorists. The average increase for the entire state is 7, per than the boost for Long Beach motorists. automobile insurance buried by sand when the walls rate changes are based on the record of accident loss costs incurred by insured motorists in'the Hammond said. The increase in liability rates will be offset some for motorists vfh'o also carry insurance for damage they may do to their oSvn car. Premiums were re- duced today by ?2 a year on the additional insurance cover- age for full comprehensive am deductible collision. HOWEVER, THAT reduction will bo wiped out if you drive a 1959-model car with a huge windshield. Underwriters last Dec. 17 tacked on a 51 to 53 surcharge premium for 1959 cars having any one pane of "glass listing at 5100 or more. And if you think your new auto insurance rates are high in the Southland, feel sorry for San Francisco. San Francisco's basic liability coverage is higher than it is in Long Beach. (Photos on Page A-3) CLEVELAND (AP) Anastas I. Mikoyan, No. 2 man of the Kremlin, ar- rived in .Cleveland today to start a 13-day cpast-to- cqast tour. He'bustled off ah'airlines plane and down a double line of police while several hundred picketing nationality groups were blocked back by ropes. Mikoyan tipped his hat as he got off a Capital Airlines plane about five minutes after it arrived at a.m. Then he hurried inside, the concourse gates to hold a brief news con- ference before leaving the air port. Cyrus Eaton, Cleveland in- dustrialist, and his wife greeted the first deputy premier as he alighted, Mrs. Eaton speaking in. Russian. BI1KOYAN TOLD her it was very good to speak Hussian with her, and solicitously ad- vised 'the 75-year-old Eaton, who will be his host here, that IB should wear a hat on his white-haired head, lest he catch cold. Before the plane landed, sev- eral hundred Iron Curtain country nationality groups had of the hole caved in around gathered at the airport. They Sen. Dirksen Heads GOP Senate Force Kuchel Elected Whip as Liberals' Power Bid Beaten WASHINGTON The new 86th Congress convened today already torn by wrangling over Re- publican leadership posts and the ground rules for a looming new battle on civil rights. The bang of gavels in Sen- ate and House chambers at noon launched the session he- fore packed galleries gay with the bright dresses of admiring women folk of the members. But beneath the normal hearts and ilowers atmosphere, collective blood pressures were seldom higher for an opening session. SENATE REPUBLICANS had just come from a party caucus .where the old guard put down an insurgent rebel- lion and named Sen. Everett M. Dirksen, a 1952 supporter of the late Sen. Robert A. Taft of Ohio, as party floor leader.. Dirksen won the Senate GOP leadership over Sen, John Sher man Coopsr of Kentucky by a 20-14 vote with all 34 Rerubli- can senators participating. By a similar 20-14 margin Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel of Cali- fornia was chosen whip or as- sistant floor leader. Kuchel won over Sen. Karl Mundt of South Dakota. So, to some extent, the choice HOME The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY Vol. 294 PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 46 PAGES TELEPHONE HEB-1161 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) HIGH TIDES BATTER BEACH High tide of 6.7 feet today serids :dcean water surging past sand dike toward apartment buildings at Seal Beach today. Residents had sandbaged doorways, however, and no damage was reported. Calrn- Jhg seas lessened effects of high tides, which followed dose on Tuesday's photo.) broke blade after blade on a power saw, arid tried-un- successfully to move the casing with a powerful jack. Filially a crane was backed nto position and a hook low- ered. Stafford fastened the look to the metal and the crane loisted it far enough for him to pull his foot out. A doctor had been lowered into the shaft to give him seda- tives, and he had been fed hot soup. As the 40-year-old workman rode to the surface on a bucket seat hauled by the crane a mighty cheer went up from the rescue workers arid spectators. TUBES had been sunk in the hole, in the sandy soil, as a protection to Staf- ford as he dug. One tube slipped down on his foot Stafford had survived an in- credible four hours of being him. Workmen were able to reach a gloved hand. The coroner was called and lowered into the dole. The hand twitched Workmen went at the pile again. They discovered one metal tube, same as the one pinning Stafford's foot, had fallen across the hole above Stafford's head, giving him breathing space. THE RESCUERS dug deeper until Stafford's head was un- covered. Stafford, a husky man, was not only alive, but conscious. "Give me some he asked. "Then give me a steak and I'll help you dig me out" A crowd of about was attracted to the scene. Above, watching intently, was his.wife. Only prayers in terrupted her weeping. "Please she prayed. 'Get him out." carried such signs as "Black- "Mikoyan, your.hands are red with Russian blood." Police and security agents roped off the concourse and the pickets were not jiermitted in- of the Dlrkseh-Kuchel team gave representation to both sides. House Republicans were split right down the'middle, as the result ofsa .scrap Tuesday that saw Hep. Joseph W. Martin (Mass) ousted as party leader after 20 years at the helm. Named to replace him was Rep. Charles A. Halleck And senators of both parties were taking sides of a .possibly prolonged battle over that body's rules. The issue: whether to make it easier to cut off endless debate that backers of more federal protection for Negro voting rights have contended is the main weapon used to defeat such legislation. ONLY HOUSE Democrats tightly under control of Speak- er Sam Rayburn were without any raging feuds for the moment, Rayburn, who has served as speaker longer than any other man, was chosen again at a party caucus Tuesday. It put him in the presiding chair of the House for a ninth two- year term. Actually, the party only nom- inated. But the overwhelming strength of the Democrats made today's election by the House itself only a formality. Sen. Lyndon Johnson of Texas was re-elected Senate Deny in 'WHERE TO FIND IT New polar secrets were re- vealed to scientists during the recent International Geophysi- cal Year, according to the sec- ond article of a series, on Page A-10. B-l. B-9. B-9. C-8 to 11. C-4, 5. A-I8. Death B-2. B-8. B-S, Shipping A-16. C-l, 2, S. A-26. TV, O-1Z. B-9. B-4, 5. Yonr A-2. Youth Slain, Dump Body Out on Road COALINGA (UPD 20- year-old Barstow youth was murdered Tuesday night anc his bullet-riddled body dumped out on a road four miles south side nor on the observatory platform. One red-haired youth ran onto the field while Mi- toyan was still in the plane, but was hustled away by police. (Mikoyan will visit Los An- geles Sunday and Monday. His )lane is scheduled to arrive at International Airport at p.m. Sunday.) FOR HIS DEPARTURE from Washington at a.m., Mi- koyan was 15 minutes early at the airportj then his start was delayed 27 minutes past regular takeoff time. During the flight he sat be- side Soviet Ambassador Mikhail Menshikov, who read him the news from New York and Washington newspapers. A dimpled airline stewardess, Democratic leader at a party meeting just before the Senate convened. He has held the post since 1953. Johnson called on Democrats (Continued on Page A-4, Col. 6) (Continued on Page A-4, Col. 1) Ike Present at Prayers for Salons WASHINGTON 5 Presi of here. Deputy Coroner Alphonse Dickinson said the victim, Rob- ert Burr Miller, had been shot at least six times through the head and body with .25-caliber bullets. He said two of the shots weie fired behind the left ear, one in the hip, one and possibly two in the right chest and arm and at least one in the right elbow and forearm. Damage in Lemon Plant Fire VENTURA W) Fire caused an estimated damage to a huge lemon-packing plant near Ventura today. More than two-thirds of the 700-foot-long Blue Gold lemon plant in Montalvo was de- stroyed in the flames. A fire wall saved one end in which lemon crates were stored. dent Eisenhower worshiped to day at church services marking the convening of the 86th Con- gress. The President was joined In the congregation at the Na- tional Presbyterian Church by cabinet officers, other adminis- rat ion officials, members of Congress and members of the Supreme Court. He was accom- panied from the White House by his chief aid, Wilton B. Per- sons, and Press Secretary James C. Hagerty. GOPFight aid to President Eisenhower said today the White House reli- giously refrained from any in- terference in the House Repub- lican leadership contest. Press Secretary James C. Hagerty made the statement when asked for comment on an assertion by Rep. Joseph W Martin (Mass) that White House aids, but not the. Presi- dent himself, had a part in his defeat. By a Vote of 74-70, House Republicans Tuesday, ended Martin's 20-year reign as their leader and gave the post to Rep. Charles A. Halleck (Ind) MARTIN NAMED the White House aids he said helped Hal leek as Gerald D. Morgan, spe cial counsel to the President Jack Anderson, administra ive assistant, and Edward A Morgan's assistanl Martin added that the three conferred with Halleck about a month ago.' "I don't know where Joe got that information, Hagerty said. "I think he wa know he was mis taken. "There has been no Whit fouse interference one way o the other." i Eisenhower's position, Hag crty said, was that the con ests over Republican leader ship in both the House and th Senate were matters for de cisio'n by the GOP members o Congress, Hagerty added: "I have talke Morgan, Anderson an McCabe, and the statement lave just made represents th true' facts." lain Not Until This Weekend A storm which was expected to hit the Southland onight has fizzled and riot more rain is in sight until ic weekend, the Weather .Bureau reported today. Meanwhile, government agencies and property own- :'s were cleaning up the debris left by a norther which :ruck rath driving fury Monday night. That rst of the sorely needed rain to the ountryside, but also flooded many intersections and STRIKE VICTIMS Ventura County fought the blaze. County Fire Chief Bill Haggard estimated damage at more than a half million dol- lars. Prayers were offered 'peace in our time" and the wisdom to meet and deal with "the large designs of this challenging hour." Vice President Nixon arrived for the 8 a.m. service a few minutes before the President. Fire companies from all over The service was conducted by the Rev. Theophilus M. Taylor, moderator of the General As sembly of the United Presby terian Church in the United States of America. Airline Employes Picket Pilot Union LOS ANGELES W> American Airlines grounc personnel iOltd by the pilots strike have started picketing the pilots' union. A line of pickets appeared Tuesday in front of the of- fices of the Air Line Pilots Assn. They said they repre- sented the local em- ployes laid off by the airline because of the strike, now in its 19th day. Meanwhile, in Washington American Airlines said to day that the head of the pi lots union had turned down a proposal that AFL-CIO president George Meany ar bitrate the strike. aused scattered wind damage. The Weather Bureau's five- ay forecast called for general ain in Southern California near le end of the week, with tem- erature range near normal for ong Beach (48 to 67 MORE SNOW is expected hove tile level. The Monday night-Tuesday morning storm brought heavy nowfall to the mountains, and even ski resorts announced pcning of uphill facilities. Operating today will be Green Valley, which has 14 nches of snow; Mt. Baldy, 18; nd Snow Valley and Snow ummit, 12. Ski facilities will pen Saturday at Kratka Ridge, ?hich has 18 inches; Moonridge, inches, and Mt. Waterman, IE nches. MEANWHILE, a 6.7-foot tide ascaded over the beach a Surfside Colony this morning loosing the main roadway anc garages. No damage to homes vas reported. An official of the Orange County colony said R consider able amount of sand was los' ilong the major portion of th< jeach. Efforts are being made to ruck in loads of concrete.to deposit along the west portion of the colony, scene of cxten ,ive storm and erosion damage six years ago, the official said. MANY RESIDENTS experi enced difficulty getting from :heir homes to their cars be cause of the flooding along th roadway. Sand and debris along the road made it difficult fo drivers to leave for their jobs The colony official said clear ing the roadway of debris ani sand washed up by the ocea; was to begin later in the day Alaska's Chief Is Recovering JUNEAU, Alaska William A. Egan, who has spen most of his time as governo of this new state in the hos was resting comfortabl today after undergoing surgery Egan, 44, was inaugurated a the first governor of the state of Alaska last Saturday Four hours after the ceremon he entered the hospital. Tuesday, during a four-hou operation, surgeons removed h gall bladder and a gall stone. Satellite Put on Pad LOS ANGELES xmnd satellite the first ever o be launched on the Wesi on its pad at Van enberg Air Force Base. Some time within the nex' ew days scientists will set fire o its rocket vehicle's tail and 'reject Discoverer will be un der way, headed for a pole-to orbit. A dozen or more Discovere: atellites will be launched from he California coast this year of them carrying hundred if pounds of instruments to tel man what he will face when h 'entures Into space. Some also will carry mice and, later, moh keys. THE DISCOVERER satel Ues will be pointed southwar :o orbit around the earth from pole to pole. The first few ar expected to stay aloft for onl a matter of hours before the plummet back to burn up i the earth's atmosphere. Before they do, however, the will eject a capsule containin instruments and any anima can be re covered by Air Force and Nav search crews. The first satellite will t powered by a Thor mlssi topped by a smaller Bel Hustler rocket. Some of th following shots will be simila [y powered but before long th Thor-plus. booster Is expectei fo be replaced Atlas missiles. with might Weather- Partly cloudy tonight and Thursday, Patchy early morning fog. Lit- tle change in tempera- ture. Noon temperature 65. Bus Falls on Side, j fO Injured ST. GEORGE, Utah en persons were injured to- ay, three seriously, when a us tipped on its side on an curve of U. S. 91 in south- estern Utah. The bus was a Greyhound! ines scenicruiser en route Salt Lake City to San o, Calif. The accident was 2 miles west of here, In .ountains near the Utah-Ne- ada state line. Two ambulances brought ths njured to a hospital. Highway Patrolman Julian 'ox said the bus carried 15 asscngers. The driver was Villard H. Lunt, 55, of Cedar ?ity, Utah. He was not in- ured. THE UNINJURED boarded second bus, which was about 5 minutes behind the first, nd continued their trip. Fox said the bus did a cpm- lete about-face on the. icy ighway before turning on ita ide into a 15-foot-deep road- ide ditch. One of the seriously injured ras identified at the hospital LS Jean Sanders, no age or ad- Iress immediately available. Fox said she was wedged be- ween the baggage carrier and he ceiling of the bus and res- cuers had difficulty getting ler out She was still uncori- cious several hours after iccident. She also had a frac- tured collarbone, several brok- n ribs and head Injuries. 6 Men Die in Collision With Truck KENTON, Ohio Ten- ncssee men were killed early today when their automobile collided he a don with a tanker truck on U. S. 68 about two miles north of here. The truck driver said it was carrying a load of highly ex- plosive liquid chemical, which he did not identify. There was no explosion or fire, however. SHERIFF'S DEPUTIES said all six victims were from Cleve- land, Tenn., and vicinity. The driver of the tanker was Identified as Albert F. Ohl, 24, of Tiffin, Ohio. He was taken to San Antonio Hospital here for treatment of lacerations and a possible chest injury. Hardin County sheriff's dep- uty James Baldridge said he plans to charge Ohl with driv- ing left of the center line. 4   

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