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Long Beach Press Telegram: Tuesday, April 3, 1951 - Page 1

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   Long Beach Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - April 3, 1951, Long Beach, California                               FIGHT ON SENATE TROOP CURB FA Lodge Seeks Reversal, but Loses Battle Restriction of Aid Until Air Mastery Gained Also Beaten By JACK BELL WASHINGTON, AprH 3. (AP) Sen. Lodge (R.-Mass.) today led and then abandoned n move to reverse a Senate vote calling tor Congressional action on future assignment of troops to Europe. Lodge first moved to strike out cf a pending resolution a section j amended by Sen. McClellan (D.-, Ark.) yesterday to say that no more than four American divi- sions should be dispatched to Eu- rope "without further Congres- sional approval." Then, after debate had gone on for nearly ar hour. Lodge told the Senare he is a realist and realized Irom the outset his pro- posal had no chance of approval. He said he mrrely had offered liis amendment to draw the issue sharply and that since the debate had made It clear, he was with- drawing the amendment. He had stressed that the Sen- ate ought to back down on Its stand that Congress should pass on every deployment of troops to Europe. The Senate refused late today to declare against sending ground troops to Europe until the western Allins are assured of of the air there. Sen. Kern (R.-Mo.) '.proposed that no additional S.iroops go to Europe until top U, S.-mill-; tary leaders "should certify to the Congress that In their opin- ion, sufficient air strength will be available to control the air over, western to the degree nec-i cssary to assure the safety and effectiveness of sucn ground troops." I Th vote against amend- ment was GJ !o 24. DEFENSE W Lodge argued that the'Senate's stand would mean that Congress i have to take it1 was proposed to sfnd "supporting and engines to join the six divisions the- tlon Intends to Dwlght D. F.lscnhower's North Atlantic defense force. "You are going to deprive the i American soldier of his Sunday Lodge declared. j Before the Senate is a resolu CRIES WIFE Hubby's Snores Split Couple SHE LOST WEI6HT_Mrs. MichalLk, 20, of Chi- cago was awarded a week; separate yesterday for herself and 1-year-old daughter when that the snorimi of her husband, Richard, is unbearable. She told that his snoring has caused her to lose sleep and height, arrd that her hus- band inored even at the movies. Her fiuSband, who sorrowfully admitted, "It must be 'today tnojred to a: hotel (Associated Press Wirephoto.) LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 1951 EDITION VOL. 63 PRICE 5 CENT: (Fouiv TELEPHONE 6-9066 Yanks Slash Across 38, Enter Red Korea in Force Tests of Evidence in Double Slaying Satisfactory' "pIVERSIDE, April 3. (AP) Authorities said today that -LV FBI tests of evidence in the double killing of an 18- Truman Sees Need for Faith, Blasts Crime Religion Called Barrier to Tide of Red Aggression By ERNEST B. VACCAIIO WASHINGTON, April 3. (AP) President Truman de- clared today: "Americans: need the burn- ing faith of religion to pre- vent a Communist tide of ag- gression from sweeping across the world." He also said that religious prin- ciples command a fight on j ized crime and: vice. I "The task ahead is full of un- certainties and Mr., Truman said, "but we need not be afraid if we have the faith." The President spoke as a cor- i nerstone was laid for a new building for the yeac-old New York Avenue Pres- byterian Chuijph here. Abralimi Lincoln once was a member of the church, j Mr. Truman said: i MONKEY BUSINESS Only Two Got Loose but Oh, What a Mess! VAN NUYS, April 3. UP> There's no business like mon- key business, Mrs. Ruth Hart- man learned to her dismay when she arrived at her pel shop this morning. During the night, two Java monkeys escaped from their cage, killed two cockateel birds, bit one puppy, freed six others from their pen, scattered bird- seed over the floor, overturned a tank of tropical fish, and left the place in a general shambles. The simians were still at it when an employe   An at- ark, X. J.. is charged with mur-' T anH adioininp teiri- Iractive. curly-haired brunet ad- dcr in the deaths of Richard tcm mltted today that she set lire and his wife. Doris, both' It probably will result in a the apartment of two girl friends ,18. They, were slain last week! five-year assurance of no work because they "teased me about; on an isolated desert road near I stoppage, negotiators announced my hair in front of a guy." here. Mrs. Delores Marie Weber, 20, Walker, picked up that night, Employers offered the clerks held for investigation of has denied any knowl-' an increase in weekly salary of. son in connection with a blaze :edge of the killings, but he has 54.50, effective April 1, and an I which damaged an apartment be- i admitted, Sheriff's Capt. Don additional health and welfare pay-; longing to Mrs. Delores Haines Schrader said, that his car struck! of S2 a week, effective Way and Mrs. Patricia Mosley, near where the latter'sjl- Representatives of Retail, day. Ibody was found, with his 8-1 Clerks Local 324 accepted the of- She was putting up her hair in month-old son playing happily onl fer- Representatives of the in- the apartment, Mrs. Weber toldla pink blanket beside it lustry, who were authorized to police, while her two girl friends Mrs. Cook was'taken nearly I complete negotiations, accepted and a man companion watched, ho miles away and shot to death for the employers, and will pre- "Delores and Pat took my ban- in an abandoned rock quarry, sent to the store operators the dana off and were teasing about my hair in front of she said. Angered, she left the apartment and waited till the others went out. me i Searchers found the days later. her body two offer at a meeting to be held hore Officers have sent to the FBI in Washington a .45-callber pistol found in Walker's car when he Then she borrowed two matches Was arrested, a .45 slug found In from a neighboring apartment, the ground near Mrs. Cook's and used a table knife to pry body, and a fender from Walk- open the apnrtment door. ier's car, the latter to determine Mrs. Weber .said she started an imprint in the dust lire with tablecloth, and a came from the woman's corduroy blanket Then she turned on the' skirt. She was fully clothed gas Jets and left. when her body was found, except Firemen extinguished the blaze for her brassiere, which was on quickly and damage was less than 5100. (Continued on Page A-4, Col. 7) late today. Richard Johnston, secretary of the union, attended the conler- ence this morning. He could not be reached after the agreement was announced. He has negoti- ated for several weeks and empowered to call a strike If the union demands were not met. The old contract expired April 1. In addition to Long Beach, the following areas are affected: Lakewood, Compton. Whittier, Bellflower and all of Orange County. NATION-WIDE HONESTY TEST Educational Organization Losing New Half Dollars NEW YORK, April 3. UP) On the theory that people are honest, a Negro educational organization today started losing new It expects eventually to lose up to a possible of the shiny 50-ctnt pieces. And, depending on the honesty of the finders. It hopes to get its investment back, plus some. "We have faith that the average persbn is honest, said a spokesman lor the Booker T. Washington Memorial. "We ex- pect to prove It to the cynics." I Launching the project, a volunteer ol 15 college girls today fanned out over New York Qty, deliberately and with abandon losing half dollars In bus termlmas, hotel lobbies, phone booths, subways, and rallroafl stations. Each hfJf dollar, a coin specially minted with Congressional authorization, is In an envelope with a lejter addressed "to an .honest pernon." It that the finder send or rejunv the coin, to the memorial which Is devoted to industrial schools and better edu- cation facilities for Negroes. The goverttbent approved selling of the coins at a premium, thus enabling Hie memorial to clear 50 cents on each purchase. After New York, the memorial plans; to carry its money- losing project to other cities across the country.: f 3 Britons Protest U. S. Air Base LONDON, April 3. A peti- tion with signatures pro- testing construction of a U. S. air base near Newbury was pre- sented to the House of Commons today. The air base, known as Green- ham Common, is a mile and a half from the center ot Newbury In Berkshire. A Royal Air Force field during the war. it is now being enlarged for use of U. S. B-29 and B-50 Superfortiess bombers. The project includes diverting a: main road and demolishing fc scfcrc of houses HouseUniOKs Transfer of Ships WASHINGTON, April 3. W The House armed services com-1 mittee today unanimously proved transfer of 24 U. S. de-j stroyer escorts to friendly na- tions under mutual defense agree- ments. The committee acred immedi- ately after getting a request for approval from Adm. Forrest Sherman, chief of naval opera- tions. But in seeking consent, Sherman urged ending the pro- gram of warship transfers be- cause of this country's need for antisubmarine vessels. Congressional approval of ship transfers was required under a recent shipbuilding bill which stipulated that Con- gress must give Its consent be- fore any "battleship, carrier, cruiser, destroyer or submarine" could be transferred. without change in taste, odor, or appearance! You don't have to imagine it; it's been done! The American Chemical So- ciety was told today that con- tainers of food products ex- posed to a short burst of high- speed electrons in a machine called a capacitron, can bo stored indefinitely at room temperature without apparent deterioration. The report was made by Dr. Wolfgang Huber, Arno Brasch, and A. Astrack ot the Electronized Chemicals Cor- poration, Brooklyn, N. V. They said such containers of food have been found to be sterile after exposure to such irradiation. The same has been found true, they said, of drug products. Some of the foodstuffs which were treated early in the inves- tigations, they said, have been kept without refrigeration for several years with no change of appearance or loss of essen- tial nutrients. In some cases, they said, a combination of old-fashioned preservation methods with irra- diation proved best. Gen. M'Arthur Jeeps 13 Miles Into Foe Land Three Red Jets Shot Down, Three Others Damaged By OLKN CLEMENTS TOKYO, April 3. (AP) American troops 'rolled into Red Korea in -force today along a 10-mile frent in the west. J Field dispatches- said the crossing was aggressive but cautious and met Jonly light resistance at the start These other paced Tuesday's war SaTp-e jets shot (lown three Russian-tJ'pe MIG-15s and damaged three jothers in a furious batile near Ihe Manchu- rian border. QtUerJ Fiftli Air Force planes traffic- jammed Comrrtitriistjsupply lines ir. a 'day-long ittacle against :the biggest Red triop Mildup of the Korean SKfd fighters flew 700 soi'fies tfbrteul weather choked them off by late after- "Eastern front Gen. MacAr- If 19 It ft thiir leeped 13 road miles inside UHlClllU 11 Id VIII JL North Korea on the east coast. 7 'He rode within 500 yards of the _ _ main Rrrt linp nni-Hi nf Yangvanir. missing, tscorc neia I talking only of attack. Creek'an'd okla- APril 3- Searching parties on climaxed two days oTheaVv light- 1V1 horseback and afoot started out over rugged country near here today continuing their hunt for 16-year-old Jackie Parris, missing since Sunday and feared a kidnaping victim. The school beauty's cs- go off into the woods with him. nni r-nohiii 17 u hpino-held i The sheriff said Coghill's story cort. Bill Coghill, 17, is being held jn instances. The in "technical custody in the boy at tjmes referred to the man's Pittsburg County jail.here. ,having a later said he Sheriff Bill Alexander ex- had a knife. Another time he said lARRIS Isind SiiSr7Sunday EACH Lads Who Found Rewarded YONKERS, N. Y., April 3. (JP) Two schoolboys who found in the attic of a dilapi- dated mansion here last week are each S1000 richer today. The boys, Alfred Graves and Thomas Nowak, both 12, re- ceived the money from the Cen- tral National Bank of Yonkers. administrator of the estate of Mrs. Agnes Edgar Bigelow, owner of the house. Irving R. Church, vice presi- dent and '.rust officer of the bank, said the five cousins of Mrs. Bigelow, her only heirs, consented to payment of the rewards. (Continued on Page A-4. Col. 7) Anti-American Feeling Reaches New High in India plained there are conflicting parts in Coghill's story yesterday about the abduction of his Sunday j night skating date by an armed NEW DELHI. India. April (ffi Anti-Americanism reached aj The girl has not been seen since. Alexander said, however, that Coghill has identified a picture of a McAlester man as a suspect in new high in India today under the double impact of American hesitancy in sending grain to this hungry country and Prime Min-jthe case. By an odd coincidence. ister Nehru's sharp criticism of: Coghill said he saw thP man in a a British-American resolution on "It is hard to stem criticism of. Coghill told officers an ministers today to America and its action in the man forced his way into the car'means which he and Miss Parris were he followed the man and the gisl into, the then again said he stayed in the car. Dulles Demands Russ Veto Check WASHINGTON, April 3. follow this clue further today. urged the lor- study fc scfrr Weathei Cloudy with iccajional light showers tonight 'and tomorrow. Little change irt ternperature. South to soHthweft winds, 10-15 miles per hour tonight. South- erly winds, 15-25 milai per hour tomorrow; Civilian Crisrs in Rubber Seen Under U. S. Policies WASHINGTON, April 3. The head of one of the nation's Jargest rubber products manufacturers said today "a civilian crisis In rubber" may be Imminent, unless government stock- piling and allocation polices are changed. John L. Collyer, president of the B. F. Goodrich Co., Akron, Ohio, testified before a Senate small business subcommittee looking Into the government's rubber program. "The crisis can be averted only by increaslng-jsubstantlally the total amount rubber for production of essential flvillan Coljyer sild. -j The National Production Authority yesterday, ordered new cuts in the aiwdunt fcf rubljer that may be used for civilian pur- poses in April. "Rubber lor dvflian needs can be increased -.without ;ehdan- Bering military WuHty because our total rubber stocks and our synthetic rubber, Industry will prove to be adequate fpr our rea- sonable security needs. 'The present'stockpile of about tons ol-- crude rubber Is more than ample ao carry us through a full foiir.year war at a rubber consumption level of tons or more each year. Kashmir question when the prime minister himself is in the van of the a highly placed Indian said. American and Indian officials both express concern over the de- velopments, but it seemed obvious that the Indian government had made no effort to control the anti-American feeling which ap- l pears to have far outstripped the criticism here of Britain, on the same score. Britain joined the U. S. in pro- posing a resolution to the United Nations Security Council for set- tling the Kashmir dispute be- tween India and Pakistan, and it was adopted by the council last week. Piime Minister Nehru yetserday denounced it was "ex- traordinarily objectionable" to India. There are fears in some quar- ters here that exploitation of pub- lic feeling could result in vio- lence against American officers serving on the present India- Pakistan cease-fire line in Kash- mir, with ?rave results. Coghill drive to several Nations. rounding the cart Forecastjng a possible Soviet bogged down on a muddy country veto oi japan following the There, Coghill said, the abduc- tor stooped down to drink from a creek and he started to hit him with a rock while the man was stooped over. But the girl whispered not to do it. Coghill said she later tear- fully pleaded with their kidnaper, 'If you've ever done anything ;ood in your life, do it now." But the man forced the girl to OFF THE TELETYPE Measure demands yearly check of automobile lights, A-2. British warned of harsher A-3. WHERE TO FIND IT A-9. A-9. Closslfied B-6 tec 9. Crossword. -rPage A-7. A-B. B.-4. 5. Radio and A-7. B.-5; A-10, II. A-12. Tides, B-5i Woman's 8-2. 3. of admissions to the United completion of the Japanese peace treaty, Dulles said this would make it difficult to develop a genuine security system for the Pacific. "This is an aspect of the prob- lem which I am sure you will want to consider both as belli- gerents in the Japanese war and as members of the United Na- Dulles said. SENATOR, WETRIED1' Pastors Fail to Place Probing Wager on Ponies 111., April 3. UP> Taking to heart Sen. Estes VJ Kefauver's admonition to halt crime at local levels, two Galesburg ministers tried to place a test bet on a horse yester- didn't get a bet down. Then they demanded a raid on the place they had visited. By that time it was dosed so no one was arrested. But police did confiscate a number of tickets they said were for horse race betting. Kev. Gilson of First Baptist Church and Rev. Alan Jenkins of Central Congregational Church went torUie Pas- time Club In the; business district yesterday afternoon. They said they tried to placj-ra bet on a race, but that was not accepted. However, they said, they saw other beta 8Next, the ministers Wait to the police. They club be raided, but the they couldn't raid without a WBSoU1the two pastors wejif ofjjtate's Attorney Ben and swore out a warrant Theh they accottpuiwa police anttsheriff's ftlflcert'rto By ,p.m. -the establishment was ;Stosedjand1 tocBeA. The raiders broke In and found the alpremeattoned tickets. .They took them to tth Knox County charges haye been tiled 1 case, i (C   

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