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Argus Newspaper Archive: November 15, 1971 - Page 6

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Publication: Argus

Location: Fremont, California

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   Argus (Newspaper) - November 15, 1971, Fremont, California                                THE ARGUS Fremont Newark, California Monday, November BPWC Awards TWO Scho arshlDS Friends, Relatives "KT i P _ TWO OUTSTANDING OMoM woro each pmenttd with tchoUrthlpi at Hw rccwt Scholarship Awards Night tpomored by Iht Buiimi and Club of Wash- ington township. Mrs. Raymond RchfcU, scholar- ship chairman, maitt Hn prtstntattoii h> Re- Nay and Mbi Thslma during tht fete in the Fremont Inn, located In Fremont's Warm Springs District. Orchids in Fremotrt" was the them, for the dinner meeting which was conducted by Mrs. Aldeen Bern, BPWC president. The Awards Night Is an annual event at which the local BPWC recognizes academic achievement by young women in the Fremont-Newark-Unkn City area. THE MODERN Mrs. Roger Key and Redrifwc, and Mrs. Raymond RehfeW, chairman Pathfinder Chapter Dinner Wednesday LEE CHRISTOPHER Newark's Silver Pines Golf Course at 8650 Jarvis Road will be die setting for Wednesday's monthly', dinner meeting of the" Pathfinder Chapter of the American Business Women's Associ- ation. Mrs. Larry Revell, chapter president, will serve as chairman for the 7 o'clock gathering which will feature a talk by George White of the Paymaster Corporation in San Bruno. Mr. White, who is chairman of the corporation's lecture bureau, wlH discuss forgery, the fastest growing crime.m the. United States. Paymaster has guarded against forgery and check attentions for the past 52 years, and he will tell of the methods used by for- gers and what to watch out for in protecting checks from forgers. Vocational speaker for the fete will, be Shirley Still, dental hygienist in Fremont, who will discuss ber wort. LUNCHEON SCHEDULED traveling to San Jose to- Mrs Oliver Adams Host. morrow for ttieir monthly ..ess. luncheon and a fashion show. Ralphs wuTperform are members of the Newcom- commentating duties with ers Club of Fremont. A buffet 'dub members servinz luncheon in the Bit 0' Sweden v Restaurant will be -served in conjunction with a style par- ade featuring clothes from Le- Voy's Fashions, according to models for the afternoon. Further information and re- servations are available by calling Mrs. Gilbert Anderson at 797-1620. B. WBIKNT OF WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP BPWC CHATS WITH CHAIRMEN Aldoen Bern, president; Mrs. Vkux, woman-of-fte-year chairman; and Mrs. .rtenry H. publicity chain WHY GROW 01 n? S Nose Defects Easily Aided Meetinq By JOSEPHINE LOWMAN very nose is the most prominent feature :on satisfjed with the they have. They are apt to thinkjt is too large or too small, too long or too short or too some- thing else. It does sometimes seem, "at. could have been better We have two techniques t. They are make- up and hair styling. The cos- rnetic routine consists of shading and highlighting. Use f white for hghbghting. The you while, the highlighting should be applied to those you wish to First apply your foundatKm and then be sure to blend .well so there will be no line of demarka- FIRST, LET'S consider the nose which has no special de- fects bi'l ,B just too large so that it dominates the face, This is what to do. Apply a coaling of Kght tan shading to the entire nose. Make the mouth as generous as possible and use an eyeliner and pas- tel shadow. False lashes will also help call attention to the eyes and away from the nose. The large nose cries for a full hairdo, ft needs a big frame. This can be modem- bouffant or one of the swinging styles. The bah- not be too short but should come to the chUioe. Extra hair pieces can add fbe fullness if your own hair is not up to it. Suppose your nose is too short and wHe. Shade the sides and highlight the bridge. Be sure to bfend care- fully. The hair should snort or drawn up to the top of the head. -Bangs are bad. There should be some height on top, either with your own hair or with extra pieces. Your lipstick should not be too fight. MAYBE YOUR nose is too long and has a prominent bridge. Reverse the technique suggested for the short nose. Shade the bridge and high- light the sides a little. A tight fipslick is best for you. Do not wear a cotffure which is sev- ere or geometric. Yours should be soft and fluffy and should come to the Shading and highlighting should be done with a tight touch. A little goes a long way but can make a big dif- ference. Practice makes per- fect. Generally speaking, when the nose needs help, al- ways play up the eyes. LAWfffMn t readers have bean asking for a book. Now in her now, Wuttrated book titled "Why Grow she you how to keep or get back a genuinely youthful ap- pearance. Her book fn- ctudet advice on aH _ ._ D [JW A specialist in adult and child psychiatry; Dr. Ronald Hayman, will discuss "Youth in the Family and in Society" at lomorrow evening's meet- ing of the Mission San Jose High School'Parents Club. of and for sessKn be held in room dwad at beokriom or you ordor yourt by ttnJmg (ki Canada pto etnh fcr pottage and. IwndKng. Make diadct or onfcn payable to Why Grow Otd? your ordor to Why Grew Box Dopt. B, Moiim, Iowa 5WM, JMve in 41717 Palm One of the objectives of the club this year is to Involve more parents in the school activities, according to Mrs. Harold Alameda of the club. She added that the meeting is open to the public as well as to parents of students attend- ing Mission San Jose. COUNCIL MEETING SET Registration will start at lomorrow morning for the H) o'clock business meet- ing of the Newark-Haven PTA Council in the Newark Com- munity Center at 35501 Cedar Bonlevard- On the agenda for the day are reports from the Decoto and MacGregor School PTA units; and instructional work- for school PTA corn- elections, nomi- The gathering is open to the public, according to Kathryn S Cunningham, publicity chairman for the council. D8RTY Dtt A on You! )ropcry rot Mot PARK LANEpRENCH rw M nc TEUM ma ma mm St. James Episcopal Church in Fremont was beautifully decorated with standards of pink-gladioli and white chry- santhemums for the recent 3 o'clock nuptials in which Miss Lydia Juliette Clark became the bride of -Michael Curtis Santor. TJie bride, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Thomas Clark of Eric Street in Fremont, was given away in marriage, by her father during the double ring cerenwny performed by the Rev. B. B. Lyon. ?INK TRIM accented the bride's floor-length gown of white Victorian cotton, lighteo1 by an Empire bodice which extended 1o a square- cut neckline and long sleeves: A garland of baby while roses and carnations was worn in the bride's hair, and she carried a bouquet of pale p'nk and white roses. Adding a traditional touch, the bride also wore a wedding ring which belonged to her great-greaf-giiandmclher; and for. "something new" she wore a special handmade gar- ter given to her Schmierer. THE BRIDE'S SISTER, Miss Maureen Marie Clark of Fremont, attended her sister as maid of honor in a toe- length frock of maroon silk, trimmed with pink flowers at the high waist of the bodice featured a square neck- line and no sleeves. Her flow- ers a round bouquet of pink rosebuds and baby': breath. Similarly attired, only in dresses of navy blue, were the two bridesmaids, Miss Linda Woody of Fremont and Miss Connie Clizbe of Peta- luma. THI BRIDEGROOM, son of Mr. and Mrs. William L. Santor of Kerlin Street in F remon t, had Simpson of Sunol stand up for him as best man. Seating guests as ushers were Julio; Sfaben of Sunol, Patrick White of Fremont, and E. Thomas Clark Jr. of Fremont, the bride's brother. .Also taking roles in the cer- emony were Anne Christine Clark of Fremont, 3, another sister the and Gina Lynn Sehhiierer of ;Fremont, 4, serving as flower girls and wearing miniature brides- maids ensembles. POLLOWiNG me ritual, the just-weds greeted 250 guests at a champagne reception hi the church hall.. 'Among the were Mark Santor of Davis Mr. and.Mrs. Thomas'Dofa- scha of Dublin, and Mr. and Mrs. Steven Santor of Union City, brothers and sister: of the bridegroom and their spouses. Also Juliette Farmer Brown of Grandview, Washington the bride's grandmother; Mr and Mrs. Defoert P. Brown of Culve.r City and Dudley Brown of Pasco, Washington aunts and an uncle of the bride; and Miss P a m i I a Kaye Brown of Culver City, a cousin of the bride' who at- tended the guest book. THE NEW Mr. and Mrs. Sartor are now making first home together, in Stind after honeymooning in Carmel. The bride was graduated from John F. Kennedy High School in 1970, and the bride- groom received.his diploma from Washington High School He is currently with The Fremont Honor the Lucien Van de Graafs., A large gathering of 75 friends and 'relatives recently surprised Mr. and Mrs. Lu- cisn Jan Van de Graaf, mark- ing the wedding anniversary. The home of their son, Jan, and his wife in Newark's Lake District was the setting for Saturday's fete for Ihe Van .de Graafs, who ex- changed marriage vows on November II, 1936, in what was then the Dutch East In- dies. HELPING with arrange- ments for the party were the couple's other sons and their wives, Mr. and Mrs.' Donald Van de Graaf of Fremont, Mr. and Mrs. Dirk Van de Graaf of Newark, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Van de Graaf of San and Paul Van de Graal of San Leandro. Also in attendance were the honored pair's grandchildren, Marco, Sheila, Fabian, Jef- frey, Nicole, and Steven Van de Graaf. FOLLOWING a champagne toast proposed by 'their youngest son, Paul, Mr. and Mrs. Van de Graaf. greeted well-wishers and joined them for a buffet dinner. After dinner, guests danced in the dining room, which was beautifully appointed with pink and white 'streamers, wedding bells, and flowers.- A highlight of the evening was the presentation of a money tree to the feted couple. AMONG -tfe g'uests at-the festivities were Mr. and Mrs. Franz Micpla :von Fur- Ben Lily of Fresno; Mr. and Mrs. Rudy Smith of Union City; Mr. and Mrs. Lu- cien Toorop of Oakland; and the Waller Diemonts of Red- wood City. Also, Mr.-and Mrs. Eric Hess of South San Francisco; the William Zchls of Cuper- tino; Miss Lena Rodcnrys of Redwood City. Newark Senior Citizens Celebrate An afternoon of games will follow tomorrow's 13th Anni- versary Luncheon sponsored by the Newark Senior Citizens Club. Silver fines Golf Club in Newark will be Ihe setting for the 12 o'clock luncheon, with the members later adjourning to the Newark Community Center at 35501 Cedar Boule- vard for games! Approximately '100 mem- bers are expected to attend the festivities, according to Mrs. John club presi- dent. She added that persons over 50 years of age are eligible to join the club, meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month in Ihe Newark Community Center. looking ahead to Thursday, December 2, members are chartering a bus to San Fran- cisco where they will share a day of games with 'another se- nior citizens club. Further information regard- ing the club may be obtained by calling Mrs. Rood at 797- 7241. DIAMOND JUBILEE SET Members of the Country Cjub; ol Town- ship's Amerih'ies' 'Committee busily working this morn- ing on-plans-for the'OCTWs' Diamond Jubilee celebration on Tuesday, December 7. Mrs. Robert Hunt, presi- dent, is opening her Washing- ton Boulevard home in Fre- mont to members for the work! session! On their 'agenda is discussion' of 'seating ar- rangements and personnel for the receiving line. The Fremont Elk's Club at 38991 Farwelll Drive will be the setting for o'clock 75th birthday will be attended by slate, county, and local officers of the Cali- fornia Federation of Women's Clubs. MEW HOME FOR JUST-WZDi Mn. Mkhatl Cwti,   

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