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Eureka Humboldt Standard: Monday, August 6, 1962 - Page 7

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   Eureka Humboldt Standard (Newspaper) - August 6, 1962, Eureka, California                               Engle Sees Slim Chance For Tax Cut WASHINGTON _ s Clair Engle] D-Calif., said toda chances for congressional a proval of a tax cut were not ver good. It would be disastrous for Pre ident Kennedy to ask for a cut and not get it, he added. Engle made the comments in a interview filmed for release ove California television stations. The California Democrat said tax cut draws "substantial oppos lion" from Sen. Harry. F. Byrd D-Va., chairman of the Senat Finance Committee, and fror Rep. Wilbur D. Mills, D-Ark. chairman of the House Ways i Means Committee. He said a poll of .Democrat! senators indicated a "thin mai gin" in favor of a tax cut. "This is something I think th' President ought to watch ver; carefully because it would be a mistake to ask for it if he couldn' get he said. But chances o congressional approval would in crease if economic conditions worsened, the con tinued. "He has to count noses and he ihinks he has the votes to ge a tax cut and the economic in dictators are plain enough, he should Engle added "Otherwise he'shouldn't because if would be disastrous for him to ask for it and not to get it." Engle favors a cut in the lowe income brackets if one is re- quested. He said this would in- crease consumer buying power and thus provide markets needec to encourage business to increase capital investment and production. FIRST ROUND TIE ST. ANNES, Eng. (UPD-Gay Brewer of Crystal River, Fla., shot a course record equalling 35- 33-68 Wednesday to lie with Har- ry Weetman of Britain and Bob Charles of New Zealand for the first-round lead in the Car- ling-Lancastrian Open golf tourna- ment. Surrounding Finance Director LeRoy Starkey are members of the Eureka Finance Department, winner of the 1962 municipal award from the California' Society of Public Accountants for dem- onstrating the greatest improvement in accounting methods of any California city under Left to right, Kenna Stevens, Barbara Overmoe, Chester Reas (in the rear) Dorothy Shank (peeking Edie Becker (upper) Ardyce Gwin Jesca Steph- ens, .Joyce Davenport Starkey in front, then Jean Harper above to the right, Claire Allen, rear, Theresa in front of her Madeline Curry, Pearl Cherry, JoAnn Barry, front; Signe Larseri, above, Dolores Cook, Al Wines in the rear row; Joe Mc- Namara and Naomi Nelson. Four Reasons Why Freeway Safer Than Streets Of City LOS ANGELES (UPI) Belter before leaving a freeway. rivers, safer auotmobiles. feai citations and highway engineer- g liave been combined to make alifornia freeway driving three meS as safe as driving on a city reel. This figure. is based on files ept by the Los Angeles Police epartment and. substantiated by alifornia Highway Patrol. The rceords list some of the asons why freeway driving is fer than non-freeway driving. The majority of freeway drivers ave become "defensive ey not only watch their own erations but they watch others ar them. Most freeway drivers keep with- their lanes and only change len it'is safe to do. They care- :ly work their way to the right One of _______ "Northern Calif, largest landscape contractors" Turfing Lawn Construction Complete Landscaping Service Lawn Shrub Layout Rototilling Tractor Work BOX 897 CALL HI 3-4028 EUREKA Because freeway driving is nor mally high-speed driving mos drivers won't go on a freeway i their, ears are not reasonably we] maintained. Most drivers realize that Lo Angeles freeways are well po liced and that citations for moving violations in California are expen sive. Also, highway engineers an waging a never-ending battle ti make freeways safer. They are concentrating on the ever-danger ous headon collision. When the first freeways were built the engineers recommendec that roses be planted in the di viding strip to keep headligh ,lare out of the eyes of approach ing drivers. Now a new approach to thi problem has been taken." The par .ially completed Santa Monica Freeway linking downtown Loi Angeles .with Santa Monica wil have Alsynile translucent plastii paneling on top of a concrete di vidcr. This plastic paneling, long as- sociated with the building indus- try, has been improved for high- way use. State highway engineer F. N. Hveem said the plastic for high- way use must be sufficiently opaque to completely dim oncom- ing high-beam headlights, must be able to withstand the weather and must have a low gloss to prevent sjn-glare. MONDAY TUESDAY ONLY 8 pc. Hollywood BED OUTFIT (2 COMPLETE BEDS) ale MONDAY and TUESDAY ONLY Two complete Hollywood Beds for the Low price of This is a .regular outfit on sale for two days only Your choice of Beige or Grey Plastic upholstered headboards FREE DELIVERY EASY TERMS OPEN FRIDAY EVENINSS UNTIL P.M.. ERSSTAMTON EUREKA 37 W. 2nd St. Phone HI 3-3161 CRESCENT CITY 315 "L" Street Phone IN 4-4612 FORTUNA LOW'S Furniture Main St. RA 5-3141 BABY BREMEN York's city greater, James J O'Brien, left, welcomes Capt. Carl Behrens, commander of the 39.3-foot-long scale model of the German liner Bremen. Model, which acconimodates six persons and sleeps four, is making a good will trip to Atlantic coast cities. 'Greatest Story1 To Be Mode Af Home By VEHNON SCOTT HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Like a avalry charge in an antique producer-director George tevens is rushing to rescue the movie capital, but with money in- lead of bugles and sabers. He will film "The Greatest Sto- y Ever Told" smack dab in film- town, thus becoming something of a financial savior to thousands of actors, technicians and other pic- ture folk suffering from a plague of runaway productions. Rather than cast bread upon the .water, Stevens will toss hard cash into the'pond to the tune of million, perhaps more. In the past, when a producer found himself with a similar sock full of dough, he sprinted to Eu- rope to squander it among the French, English and Italians who repaid him by knocking the pic- ture. "Cleopatra" and "Ben-Hur" are cases in point. For what it's worth, Stevens' Biblical epic can lay claim to be- ing the most expensive picture ever made in the United States. It is a hollow honor for the producer, however. He might have saved several million long tons of lira by exporting his pic- ture to the land of Elizabeth Tay- lor and Richard Burton. "I couldn't have made the pic- ture here without the cooperation of all the guilds and Ste- vens said. "They reorganized their calcu- lations and made specific agree- ments for this film that will save considerable money. In return they hope 'The Greatest Story Ever Told' will stimulate produc- tion of other big costume pictures in Hollywood. "Even so, the building of sets and making of costumes are more expensive here than abroad. I've explored the advantages of la- bor, extras, artisans and materi- als and found that the scale (or all of them in Europe is much lower." Much of Stevens' budget will be spent recreating sections of .the Holy City on the 15-ucrc back lot of Dcsilti studios. He also will spend more Hum a quarter million dollars building 200 feel of Jerusalem walls on location in Utah. In all he will stimulate employment of carpen- ters and laborers by 575 worker who will construct his plaster re productions. Unemployment lines will shinl when he employs 117 actors will speaking roles and more than a thousand extras. Stevens will create a small in flation in shoemaker circles. He will need no less than pairs of sandals. Armor makers, sup- poscdly extinct since feudalism laid an egg, will be called upon For 300 suits of hardware and 500 lelmets Roman And he will spend a fortune :or rags, which can be more cost- y than regulation costumes. Some shabby outfits will be nec- essary for the tattered peasants of of the-era, which means many housands of hours of employ- ment for wardrobe specialists. The statistics are endless, but Stevens meticulously has totted up every detail. His decision to ilm his picture in Hollywood is a major boom for local craftsman. GOOD lady ar- riving after hours at service station in Hamburg, West Germany, gets her gallon of fuel by dropping the equiva- lent of in a fuel vending machine. Cans may be re- tlceincd for two more quarts. Eureka Gain In Telephone Use Shown Eureka area residents are usii: their telephone more than evi before. Pacific Telephone ma >er J. A. Nealis said today. According to figures just r leased by the phone company, cu tomers in Eureka and adjace communities placed an average telephone calls each da during 1961. This is some calls p day more than in 1900 and abo more than' in 1956, Nea: said. The number of telephones h. ;one up too. Last year there we phones in the area cot pared to in 1960. Over tl last five years, there has been 36 per cent increase in the num her of telephones. Local taxes paid by Pacif Telephone have also increase The company's city and coun property taxes in Eureka, Arcat Blue Lake, Fortuna and Trin dad were in 1961 as com pared to 1960's tax bill of 700. Nealis added that there are no about KO telephone employi working in the Eureka area. The payroll last year totaled THREE BOXERS MENTIONED NEW YORK (UPI) Match maker Teddy Brenner said Tues day that Joey Giambra, Jos Gonzalez and Don Fullmer ar among those being considered a m opponent for Argentine mi< lleweight slugger Juan (Rocky livero in a 10-round televise lout at Madison Square Garden uly 21. By LARRY TAIJAIA Skin diseases for the most port are very rarely fatal and seldom incapacitating; but there are few things more uncomfortable or dis- figuring. There are a great many victims of these dis- orders who make up fifteen per cent of all doctors' of- fice calls. These Sufferers have been given hope by the .recent discovery of a new drug with tiic rather out- landish name of "griseoful- vin." Taken in pill form, this antibiotic attacks skin fungi which causes such un- comfortable and highly con- tagious ills as athlete's foot and r i n g w o r. m; Strictly speaking, griseofulvin is not now, except as a treatment for disorders of the skin. Discovered in 1030, it was first tested successfully against plant fungi, but found too expensive for gen- eral agricultural Use, Neale's Drugs 424 5th St., Eureka HI 2-9212 No Room For Offered Wafer Building Gift WASHINGTON (UPD-The idea of a proposed water resources ed- ucational building as a gift to the United States appears to be a long way from reality. There is not enough available land in the area where the Bu- reau of Water Resources of the National Rivers arid Harbors Con- gress wants to construct its mon- umental gift. In of the bu- private group, agreed to ask the Interior Department for space on National Capital Parks land on which to build a pro- posed structure 360 feet by 285 feet exclusive of grounds and parking areas. The bureau asked that the pro- posed building be "appropriately situated with respect to the build- ings occuped by the legislative and executive branches of the gov- ernment." This means the pro- rased building, "dedicated to the :ducation of the people in the 'ield of would- be some; )lace within the already crowd-! ed complex of government struc- tures. Secretary of Interior Stewart L. Udall passed the reqest for a long-term concession contract to Assistant Secretary John A. Car- ver Jr.. in.charge of Public Land Management. Carver called in T. Sutton Jett, director of the Na- tional Capital Parks which has charge of all public lands in the District of Columbia. Carver and Jett told the bureau it was "just not possible" to sup- ply such an area in the central Dart of Washington. "Both Carver and I liked the Jett' told UPI, "but the acreage is not available. We tried not to be too disheartening to the aureau, but we didn't see how the land in the area desired could be made available." Carver and Jett suggested oth- er areas away from downtown Washington. Otherwise, the gov- ernment officials have done ing about the bureau's request. William H. Webb, executive vice president of the National Rivers and Harbors Congress, said no progress has been made on the. building. He indicated none would be made until land becomes available.- THe bureau of water resources submitted to the department ai artist's conception sketch of the "'ft. The bureau has no hired .'irchitect and has no blue''- UUMBOLDT STANDARD 'Aug.'i, OUR ANCESTORS "He says a shorter work week is the only way to save his job." Stokes Benefit Game Aug. 24fh MONT1CELLO. N.Y. (UPI) The fourth annual Maurice Stokes th, Benefit basketball game, featuring many of the top players in the National Basketball Association, vill be staged at Kutscher's Coun- ry Club, Aug. 24, it was an- lounued today by Jack Twyman, :aptain of the Cincinnati Royals ind the injured Stokes' legal ;uardian. Twyman, who has been busy raising funds for the paralyzed itokes since 1058, indicated that n addition to himself such othei Cincinnati teammates as Oscar Robertson, Arlen Bockhorn and Vayne Embry will participate in he benefit game, in addition to Bob Pettit of the St. Louis Hawks. Red Auerbach. coach of the charapion Boston Celtics, wi guide the Eastern unit in le game, while the Western coach will be named next'.week. All proceeds of the game will be turned over to the Stokes fund, which in the last three years has raised approximately to aid the bed-ridden Stokes, who has been in a Cincinnati hospital since suffering a brain injury nearly four years ago. Advertisement Sleep Like Log Slop Stomach Gas 3 Times Faster Take Bell-am tablets with hot water at bed time. Read in bed until eyes shut. 'Bell-anj tablets relieve stomach 'gas due to excess stomach acid. No harmful drugs, Get Bell-ant today. 35c at druggists. Send postal to Bell-arts, OrangeburQ, N. Y., for liberal free sample. a F. MOVING STORAGE EUREKA, 8th B HI 2-2949 Local Long Distance Moving COMPLETE STORAGE FACILITIES AGENT FOR ALLIED VAN LINES The finest warehouse and moving facilities in Northwestern California TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS Planning to Attend the SEATTLE WORLD'S FAIR APRIL 21 THRU OCTOBER 21, 1962 WORLD'S FAIR SEATTLE 1962 THERE ARE NEW AUTO FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY LAWS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA If you are planning to drive to the Seattle World's Fair, and intend to extend your trip by car into British Columbia, it is recommended that you stop in our office to get your AUTO IDENTIFICATION CARD. "In Humboldt County where your itisiiriiiici'. needs are our one. and only business1" THE GEORGE PETERSEN ASSOCIATES 628 H ST. EUREKA HI 2-2971 ALL LINES INSURANCE   

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