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Eureka Humboldt Standard: Monday, August 6, 1962 - Page 3

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   Eureka Humboldt Standard (Newspaper) - August 6, 1962, Eureka, California                               Mrs. U. S. Savings Bonds On Speaking Tour Here Attractive ambassador for her country's Treasury Department, Mrs. U.S. Savings Bonds of 1962 was in Eureka and.Humboldt County today on a whirlwind tour with four stopovers. Emily Terrall, St. Helena, Ore., is promoting sale of U.S. Savings Bonds through- out the United States, having been selected from among 50 contestants at the Mrs. America pageant at Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Married to Frank H. Terrall, industrial engineer, she is mother of three sons. Ann Landers ANSWERS YOUR, PROBLEMS TONIGHT HI 3-3826 BEST OF ENTERTAINMENT RIDE mE CREST OF WE WAVE AND CARY GRANT, DEBORAH'KERR ROBERT MITCmm 'THEM IS GREW FAST GUNS CUBES I ROLAND CINEMASCO channel KVI T V eureka "When you leao the kind of life I'm leading now, I'd suggesl you husband be a good With these down-to-earth words Emily Terrall, attractive Orego housewife who is louring til country as Mrs. U.S. Saving Bonds of 1902, slopped in Eurek today at tile Chamber of Com merce. "Fortunately my husband is a good cook and my family all doe Scout-type cooking in the kitch en when I'm away. "When I go home, they slil look healthy, so I guess they man shesaid. Mrs. Frank H. Terrall of SI Helena (in privale life) spoke in formally with community leaders and club represenlalives Ihis morning, giving teslimony on the importance of savings bonds ier own family life and telling some of her travel experiences j since being elected to her honor at the "Mrs. America" pageant al Ft. Lauderdale.Fla. Mother of three sons, ages 12 TONIGHT merican NewstantJ. aptain Humboldr Presents. News by i. Huntlcy-Brinkley Report. And The Plainsman. 6. Casey. News Final. Baseball Scoreboard. (In Color) TOMORROW Price Is Right, Room. Ernie Ford For A Song. Wyman Show. Report. Mr. Maline. Five Daughters. Humboldt Presents In Court. Keys. For A Day. Do You Trust. Bandstand. Newsland. Humboldt News by Presents. KIEM TV 3 MONDAY, AUG. Toll The Truth. News. Storm. ol Night. Search For Tomorrow. Guiding Light. of Life. Astronaut. of Allakaiam. Woatner. JilS-Waltor Kronkilo News Line. Picture. Tell The Truth. Pete and Gladys. Knows Bust. Comedy Hour, Got A Secret. lliOO-Ncws and Weather. TUESDAY, AUG. 7, USJ TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1HJ Tell The Truth. News. Storm. of Night. 4-oo-seiirch For Tomorrow. Light, of Life. National Velvet. Draw Mcoraw. CronklH News. K-RED 1480 KC KIEM TUESDAY! Lociil 7l4S, IIiOOp, SiOop. Mulual New> en hull hour. OFFICIAL REPORTS] Wenlhor 7llJ, FAA Plying WcMher 1M, rilSp. stock Slock MUrkol IlSS, SllOp. Slalo Em- ployment EuriVn Polled tiK Aflvlior Hlgnwuy Pntrol 4iJip. 0 and the national beauty has blond hair, blue eyes and freck- les and is 5 feet 6 inches tall. Also "Mrs. is 37 years I of age. Wife of an industrial engineer, she docs her own housework in a home furnished with antiques she has refinished herself. "We are a Scout says Mrs. Terrall, who finds time to be a den mother, design and model her own clothes, leach wardrobe planning, personal grooming and millinery in private classes and model -in fashion shows and on television. In addilion she is a youth coun- selor in her church Sunday school. Accompanying Mrs. Terrall on her tour to promote Ihe sale of savings bonds are Newton B. Mc- Carthy, Mill Valley, slale direc- lor of Ihe U.S. Savings Bond Di- vision, and W. N. Skourup Jr., Sebastopol, area manager for the U.S. Treasury Department. "Savings bonds have formed the basis of our family invest- mcnl Ihe Oregon visitor said. The Treasury Department's Goodwill Ambassador for Savings Bonds earlier Ihis morning spoke to employes of Weycrhauser Co., Arcata, as a kickoff to a payroll savings drive at thai firm. "I had a good swim at the Eu- reka Inn last night before bed- she told reporters today. "I'm lucky it's so pleasant here today, although I'm used to rain in my Mrs. Terrnll was lo visit Scotia Inn this noon for another stop- over in her whirlwind tour, fol- lowed by a talk at Pacific Lum- ber Co. in Scotia at 2 o'clock. Her tour activities are being spaced out so Ihe representative wife and mother can return to bo wilh her family throughout the year. Thomas Jefferson composed his own epitaph and made no men- tion of his presidency. Dear Ann Landers: Just a word to that old goat who said he had outgrown his wife, and.compared her with a pair of shoes: Old geezers don't outgrow wear them out.1 Am that's probably .what happened to'his wife. .My husband and I married young and started wilh nothing. worked alongside him for 20 years. In addition to keeping a home and raising'the children I matched him hour.for hour in the busi ness. As I look back I don't know how I did it all. After our chil dren were raised and we didn't have lo worry aboul he began, lo fancy himself a ladies' man. He fell for a girl young enough, lo he his daughter. 1 told him if he wanted lo make a fool of himself to go ahead. Within three months he was back. The new shoes almost crip- pled him. He begged me to forgive him, and I did. Now he is behaving himself and I'm sure he's happy to have his comfortable shoes back.-NUFF SAID Dear Nuff: A low bow to you for having Ihe malurily and cour- age lo sweat out your husbnad's second childhood. Most women would have given this heel Ihe boot. Dear Ann Landers: I'm a boy 16 and never liked a girl unlil I mel Mary. She came from anolher school lasl year and.I fell for her right away. Lots of other guys fell for her, too. She is very popular. I was afraid to ask her out because I didn't want to get turned down. A few weeks ago I was invited to a picnic and hayride and was lold lo bring a dale. I got up the nerve and asked Mary to go wilh me. When she said yes I was .on top of the world. I wanted to make our first-date a great one so I decided to surprise her'With'a gift. I bought a very nice bracelet and had ier initials engraved on it. Yesterday she called to say she changed her mind because she didn't Ihink she liked me well enough lo spend a whole afternoon and evening wilh me. I was very disappoinled. Should I give her the bracelet anyway? II has her initials on it and I don't have any use for il Dear B.: Don'l give her the bracelet. Keep it as a n case you're tempted to go overboard for another doll. A gifl on a firsl dale makes no sense. II would have appeared .hat you were trying to buy the girl's affections. So, in a way lucky she broke the date. It saved you from making a oolish blunder. Dear Ann Landers: I'm no kid (26) and always thoughl I knew he answers. Now I'm slumped and my head is breaking from all Ihe advice Ihat is being poured on from relatives. 1 was in love wilh a beautiful girl before I wenl inlo the service. She wanled lo gel'married before I left but I decided against it. She wrote wonderful letters (about five a week) and I used lo cross oul Ihe days on Ihe calendar until we would be logether again. Afler 14 monlhs I came home. My girl was waiting for me at he bus depot with my folks. I was sluned when I saw how much she had changed. She seemed heavier and older. Thai night she old me she had a baby just five weeks before I got home. The baby lived cnly two days. It turns out my family and friends knew all about it and decided not lo lell me till I got home. My folks said this girl had always been a tramp and everyone knew il but me. She claimed she missed me so much she had to go out to keep from going crazy. I Ihink I still'love her, but I'm not sure. She wants to get mar- ried right away. What do you Dear Blasted: I Ihink you'd better hold Ihe phone. Buddy Boy. aDle olhers (and Ihis girl, loo. if you like) but forget aboul mar- riage for al leasl six monlhs. You need lime lo get your bearings. The odds against a successful marriage with this girl are prelty heavy. She was unspeakably deceitful and you'd probably find it difficult to trust her again. Does almost everyone have a good time but you? If so, send for Ann Landers' booklet, "How To Be enclosing with your request 20c in coin and a long, self-addressed, stamped envelope. Ann Landers will be glad to help you with your problems. Send Ihem ol her in care of Ihis newspaper enclosing a stamped, self- addressed envelope. Ten Killed In Valley Automobile Accidents FRESNO San Joaquin Valley experienced one of t h P iloodiesl weekends this year when at least 10 persons were killed n traffic accidents. The highway toll included two lit-run victims. Mrs. Anna Marie Bar Association Hears Speakers SAN FRANCISCO (UPD-Prom- nent speakers of liberal, moder- ile and conservalive persuasion ire scheduled to address the 85lh tmerican Bar Associalion conven- ion, which opens here today. Ally. Gen. Robert Kennedy was o address the expected awyers, family and friends at to- lay's opening session. Before the meeting closes Fri lay, Gov. Edmund G. Brown, ormer Vice President Richard I. Nixon, Postmaster General J. Sdward Day, Sen. Barry Gold- valer, R-Ariz., and Supreme Court Juslices William J. an, Tom C. Clark, and Byron I'hitc will also have participated. If all lawyers who have igned for Ihe convcnlion show up, ill set an all-time ABA alien- nnce record. The previous high f was sel two years ago n Washington, D.C. Pilot Killed In Crash At Delano DELANO (UPI) -A man was illed Saturday night when his win-cngincd Cessna crashed and xploded south of the Delano Air- iort. The victim was identified as JaslI Cunningham, 33, Rolling lllls. Sheriff's Investigators said Cun- Ingliam pnncakod his aircraft In- 0 swnmpy ground while coming 1 for n landing. He was schcd- led to pick up his three children c had left In a Delano motel. Campbell, and her son. Hamilton, 5. were killed early to- day when she apparently wenl lo sleep at the wheel and the car plunged 175 feet into, a canyon off Highway 466 west of Te- hachapi. Charles Lownsdale Jr., 18, Gar- dena, and Michael J. Bunlin, Palmdale, were falally injured when their sports car went out of conlrol and collided head-on with another auto on U.S. 6 north of Mojave. Miguel Solo Garcia, 20, Fowler, died when struck by a hit-run driver while hitchhiking on U. S. 99 in Fresno early Sunday. Anita Millican, 20, Bakersfield, was killed when her motorcycle struck a mound on a road con- struction south of Bakersfield and was airborn for 33 feet early Sunday. Columbus Elmo Cathy, 43, Lind- say, became a hit-run victim Sat- urday nighl when struck by a car on Highway 65 north of Porler- ville as he was walking to lown after running out of gas. In cus- tody on a felony hit-run charge was Dolphy Clarence Abraham, Lindsay. Everett Gastineau, 45, Fresno, iiit him on Highway 41 southwest of Fresno. James McGce, 23, San Fran- cisco, was fatally injured Friday night in a collision southwest of Bakersfield. Another hit-run victim, Adol- plius Culpepper, 68, Oildale, died Friday night of injuries suffered June 23. Apprehended two days after the Oildale accident was Richard Allen Hendrick, 23, Ba- kcrsfield, who will be arraigned on a felony manslaughter charge. S. F. Poultry SAN FRANCISCO (UPI-FSMNS) poultry ready to cook prices to retailers: Fryers 30-38. Roasters 41-48. Hens under 4 Ibs 18-28. Hens 4 Ibs nnd over 33-38. Rotary Speaker Percival Bliss "In Eureka you have the prob em of the decrease of lumberin nd the increase of tourist trade is presents a problem to th ommunily that Rotary in its po ition can help solve." Dr. Percival Bliss of San Jose ;overnor of District 513, Rotary nternational, thus addressee learly 200 members of Eureki lotary Club at a luncheon toda) t Eureka Inn. "Throughout the area from Garberville north you are facec 'ith this problem of fewer mills arger companies not as. mucl umbering being done but mon rganiration, "Dr. Bliss said. "So the lumbering will be more table but will have less effect on ie area than it has in the past.' Introduced by President Free oodwin of the local club, thi peaker complimented member n their leadership in the north rn part of the state. Lauds Servire "Your club has a fine tradition excellent service and is taking lead in bringing students from verseas to-Humboidt State Col ege. "There is a student from Mexi D now, there has been one from Guatemala and plans are being made for a student from India.' Dr. Bliss, who is dean of in traction at San Jose City Col ege, told fellow Rotarians o lans for Potary International. He said Nitish Laharry, Calcut a, first Asian to bedome presi ent of the world group, ha, barged each club this year li romote a program of introspec ion. "The individual has to see :ind of a Rotarian he is and ho' ie individually can better serv iis community. The district governor arrivec i Eureka yesterday for his firs lopover in 20 years, he sak oting the considerable change in lat period. Local Challenge He told the gathering he sees a lallenge .in the local situatioi ir rec ignition and for steps to id the problem, adding that ali ervice clubs should be active in iis program. Eureka Rotary, he said, is one 52 clubs in this district ant ne of Rotary clubs iroughout the world in 128 coun- ies. He added there are otarjans represented. Since 1947 Rotary Inlernalion- has awarded Rotary oundation fellowships at a cost million, with grants aver- ging according to the Ub governor. Dr. Bliss plans to leave for kiah tomorrow for further Ro- ry Club service. Santa Clara Man Killed In N, M. ALBUQUERQUE. N.M. (UPD- Santa Clara, man was killed nd six other persons injured, one them critically, in a collision ear Albuquerque, N.M., Sunday. State police said George Charles ateh, 52, was killed when the ar he was driving smashed into e rear of another vehicle on .S. 66 about 32 miles west ol Ibuquerque. Police said Batch's car w a s aveling at high speed when it an into the rear of a car driven Benito de Baca, 54, Kingston, riz. Batch's wife, Hannah, was ken to St. Joseph's Hospital at Ibuquerque, where she was listed critical condition. Jud Bateh, G, grandson of the 'ad man, was not hurt. Man, Would-Be Rescuer Drowned MARTINEZ (UPD-A man and would-be rescuer drowned Sun' ay night in San Joaquin River ar Bethel Island in Contra ista County. Sheriff's officers identified the 'o as Charles L. Robertson, 34, printer, nnd Alan Loughlin, 15, jth of San Jose. Officers said Robertson fell out a small bont In which he and young son were riding, nnd at Loughlin jumped in an effort snvc him. Both disappeared beneath t h c irface of the wnlcr, officers said id Robertson's son ran to n inrby resort for help. WEATHER By United Press International San Francisco Bay Area: Fa except, night and morning clouc through Tuesday; high today Sa Francisco 60, Oakland 65, S a Mateo 69, San Rafael 73; low t night 50-55; west winds 10-2 m.p.h. afternoons. Northern. Ca 1 if o rn i a: Fa hrough Tuesday except coasl fo and showers in exlreme north ti day: slight warmer in. interior. Ml. Shasta-S i s k i y o u area Cloudy through Tuesday wil showers possible today; little tern >eralure change. Sierra Nevada: Fair with litll emperalure change Ihrough Tuei day except clouds in north. Sacramento Valley: Fa: hrough Tuesday; high both day 54-94; low tonight 55-65; northwes vinds 7-14 m.p.h. afternoons. San Joaquin Valley: Fa1 hrough Tuesday; high both day 4-94; low tonight 55-65; norlhwes winds 7-14 m.p.h. afternoons. Salinas Valley: Fair Ihrou] Tuesday except overcasl nigh and morning near Salinas; hig roth days 80-90 except 68-76 nea Salinas; low tonight 50-55 north vest winds 10-18 m.p.h. after qoons; high today and low to ight Salinas 67-53, Paso Roble 0-52. Monterey Bay Area: Overcas xcept fair afternoons tliroug hrough Tuesday; high both day 0-67; low tonight 52; West wind -15 knots afternoons. Santa Clara Valley: Fair ept morning overcast throug 'uesday; high bolh days 63-75 ow tonight 50-55; northwest wind -16 m.p.h.; high today and hn onight Hollister 76-50. Fort Bragg and vicinity: Over ast except partial afternoo learing through Tuesday; litll emperature change; coasta ,'inds northwest 10-18 knots to light. Norlhweslern California: Over asl on coasl, cloudy- in norlh an air in south Ihrough Tuesda; vilh rain possible on extrem orlh coasl; little temperalur hange; high today and low to ighl Napa 76-50, Sanla Rosa 78 0, Ukiah 85-53; coaslal wind oulh 10-20 knols north of Cap lendocino and west to northwes -18 knots elsewhere. Central San Joaquin Valley rair through Tuesday; high toda 16-91: low tonight 56-62; northwe. vinds 7-14 m.p.h. afternoons. High Low Preeip. Albuquerque 92 68 Allanla 90 69 Jakersfield 86 63 Joise 77 61 Boston 81 Brownsville 91! 78 :hicago 75 68 Denver 96 51 lelroit 80 62 'airbanks 61 43 ort Worth 101 81 'resno 85 60 elena 73 50 Kansas City 90 72 .A.-Long Beach 82 64 liami 93 77 'ew Orleans 93 76 ew York 85 akland 64 57 klahoma City 104 80 hoenix 105 73 illsburgh 91 64 ed Bluff 84 59 eno 83 41 acramento 78 54 alt Lake City 78 52 an Diego 76 62 an Francisco 61 55 eatlle 65 56 lokane 70 55 lermal 105 78 ashington 88 74 leather Summary For California SAN FRANCISCO (UPD-Cali _-nia weather summary: Northern California will have lir weather through Tuesday ex :pt coastal overcast and clouds Ihe extreme north. There maj showers today on the north oast. Fair weather continued Sunday nearly all seclions of Ihe slate, igh clouds were present over the ;treme north portion of Ihe state sociated with a weak trough nd front near the Oregon and orthern California coasl. Night temperature changes were A significant with most low mperalures' about normal or ghlly below normal for this me of year. The weather charts showed a eak trough and weather front the Oregon nnd Northern Call- rnia coast. This trough and front 11 move eastward slowly rough the north portion of the nte. It will bring a little rain the extreme north portion of e state today nnd perhaps a few owers to the mountains of the ;treme north portion. BUILDING PERMITS City Building Inspector Roy mart today issued the following rmlts: Donald J. Mctntosh, 15 V street, building for bont ornge, W. D, Forbes, 1627 ne street rehabilitate foimdn- in, Dave Cumminijs, 40 Fifth street, Install partition oil, Ed contractor. HUMBOLDT STANDARD Monday, Aug. 6, Republicans Unite Behind Nixon; Shell Publicly Endorses Entire GOP Ticketv By JAMES C. ANDERSON United Press International SACRAMENTO (DPI) Rich- ard M. Nixon had the backing of a united Republican party to- day in his bid to unseat Demo- cratic Gov. Edmund G.'Brown, The high point of a two-day meeting of top-ranking state GOP eaders saw Joseph C. Shell, the conservative young assemblyman vho lost to Nixon in the June 5 primary, publicly endorse the en- ire GOP ticket. Nixon, in turn, paid tribute to Shell and likened him to the late Sen. Robert A. Taft, also a con- :ervative, who lost to Dwight D. Eisenhower at the 1952 Republican Vational Convention but who sub- equently championed Eisenhow- programs in the Senate. "That kind of an man who fought a good fight but ost it and then goes on to sup- iort the what makes a strong Republican party and hat's the kind of an example we lave Nixon said. Sharp Attack on Brown Nixon delivered a sharp attack in Brown, who, he said, is "com- ilctely incapable of giving dynam- e to the state. "The feel of victory is in the Nixon told cheering Repub- state chairman by acclamation a: licans. "There is a tide running in our direction throughout the nation. It is already deeply felt in the Easl and it is of higher intensity in the Midwest. It is beginning to be felt in California and we are going to give it a real push between now and November." Nixon said the November elec- tion in California is the most im- portant in the nation in 1962 be- cause California is about to be- come the first state in the nation in population. "The handle coming to the he said, "and the real issue of this cam- paign is 'Will California be up to the Nixon told reporters at an in- formal news conference he intends to start his intensive campaign Sept. 10 and will "continue with- out let-up until election day." Some Nixon supporters had feared that conservatives who of leadership is jacked Shell in June might try to oppose Nixon's choices for top party jobs or a Nixon-backed plat- 'orm based on broad, general principles. But Caspar W. Weinberger, an ardent Nixon man, was elected ild Center Report Due For Trustees Fulure of Ihe Child Care Cen- :r will confronl Ihe Eureka ioard of Educalion lonight, with report scheduled by a special ommittee headed by Eve Davis f the League of Women Voters. The present Child Care Cen- :r is on property owned by build- r Ernest Pierson, with the land ue lo revert back to him this nonth. It is expected Mrs. Davis vill report on other siles for Ihe :enler. as well as on Pierson's ilans for use of Ihe presenl cen- er. Public hearings are scheduled m the budgets for the new fiscal r'ear for the elementary and high school districts, while Dr. C. R, ngils. superintendent, will com- jare per-pupil costs here with the slale average for 1960-61. Olher agenda items: Executive session to interview andidates for administrative as- islant. Consideration of filling vacancy or vice principal at senior high; onsideration of election of teach- rs for Ihe new fiscal year. Authorization to discard certain lementary and secondary texls. Authorizing superintendent to repare certficialion concerning expense. Consideralion of authorizing ad- linistratio'n to proceed with plan- j ing for S street junior high, relationship with arclii- ecl, fundamental planning in ccordance with the stale loan pplication. Declaring need for emergency cpairs lo the senior high boilers. Richard Richards On Campaign lour LOS ANGELES (TJPIi State ien. Richard Richards, D-Los An- ieles, today joined stale senators and local officeholders on a cam- laign swing through eight coun- ies in Northern California. The tour began in Kern County. Olher counlies lo be visited in- lude Kings, Merced, Placer, Men- docino, Humboldl, Sacramento, and San Francisco. Richard seeks the U.S. Senate seat now held by Republican Thomas H. Kuchel. Miilbree Youth Killed On Hunt LAKEPORT (UPD-A Millbrac youth. James H. Boot, 15, acci dentally shot and killed himsel Saturday with a .32 caliber dee rifle, the Lake County sheriff office reported. The youth, his father, Join Boot, and three companions were unloading supplies from t h e i i pickup truck at Boraz Lake south of here when the gun went ofl as the boy picked it up by the )arrel. Deputies said the men were ireparing for the opening of deer ieason. They said the hunting larty believed the gun was not oaded. .he rest of the slate of officers ncluding Dr. Gaylord Parkinson, San Diego, as vice chairman. As for the platform, it was adopted without objection almost exactly the way Nixon's backers wanted it. And again, following a course of action recommended by Weinberger and other party lead- ers, the delegates took no position n resolutions on any of the con- oversial propositions on the Nov. 6 election ballot including Senate reapportionment and the brands anti-Communist amend- ment. Chico Publisher A. W. Bramwell Wife Succumbs CHICO, Calif. (UPI) Mrs. darie Bramwell, wife of A.W. Bramwell, publisher of the Chico Enterprise-Record, died Sunday evening at her home. She had been ill for some time and last December had undergone surgery for cancer. A member of a pioneer Idaho amily, Mrs. Bramwell was the laughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cameron after whom the city of Cameron, Idaho, is named. She lad been a resident of Chico since 1940. She was active in the Order of he Eastern Star in Northern Calir ornia, was a charter member of he Butte County Humane Society and a supporter of the Chico Creative Arts Center. In addition to her husband, sur- 'ivors include two. daughters, ilrs. June Topaz, and Mrs. Jewell Ray, Sacramento; one sis- er, Nina Ray Bunker, San Lean- dro, and four grandchildren. Funeral services will be held in Chico Wednesday. The family suggests any rememberance be sent to tile American Cancer So- ciety. County Budget Near Completion Preparation of the Humboldt County tentative budget for fiscal 1962-63 is near completion and printing should be completed by late this week or early next week, the auditor's office said today. Printing of the expenditure side of the budget is nearly complete, with preparation currently, under- way on revenue sheets. The budget this year is in a lew form of accounting standards adopted by the state for uniform- ly in all 58 counties of the state. Printing of the tentative budget s being done in the reproduction oom of the county clerk's office. Singer Kay Starr On Honeymoon BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (UPH :nger Kay Slarr and Nevada car gency manager Earl Spencer allicut were honeymooning to- ay. PAUL A. GRIGORIEFF, M.D. MICHAEL J. HITCHKO, M.D., F.A.C.S. ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF FREEMAN W. BORN, M.D. IN THE PRACTICE OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING 539 "6" STREET EUREKA, CALIFORNIA HILLSIDE 3-4888 "cm evening you'll always remember" THE WESTCHESTER LARIATS "one of the best song and dance troupes in the United States" Presented by the Eureka 20-30 Club Eureka Municipal Auditorium 8 P.M. MONDAY, AUGUST 6 1962 Cast of 45 Authentic Costumes Talented 2-Hour Show 40 Songs Dances ADMISSION Tickets may be purchased either at the door, from Eureka High Key Club Members or from 20-30 Club members.   

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