Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Eureka Humboldt Standard Newspaper Archive: August 6, 1962 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Eureka Humboldt Standard

Location: Eureka, California

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Eureka Humboldt Standard (Newspaper) - August 6, 1962, Eureka, California                               I Old St. Joe Hospital For Development 'f' and Tues-: fm !ome- and. morning te. S Ighlly warmer today, Hlsh today S jo-ss.. winds loutherly today and-northwesterly Tuesday Pfsclplatta: u hour amount j... 0 To date'thls season To thh date tail season. i 0.15 NormaMo dale 012' HWiest Lowest. '53 a. m.': sunset: p. m.. Duplex Due Af Site Of Landmark Old SI. Joseph hospital, land- mark at-Trinity and F streets for more than half a century and more recently a "white elephant" in the hands of the Board of Edu cation, will fall before the wreck- crs hammers, starling next week. William D. Forbes, real estate broker, who purchased the prop- erty from the schools at an auc- tion several months ago, said this morning he plans to construct a duplex on the corner in a development. Chairman Mathew Santino of the board auctioned the property off "as is" for This was decided to be the cheapest way out after bids on demolition were opened and showed the low figure to be in excess of Two lots involved, 120 by 122 feet. Given to District The building was given school district by Ernest Pierson, contractor, with the thought thai it could be used for administra- tion offices. When investigation showed the remodeling costs would prove excessive, it was pro- posed to burn the old place down in a training course for city firemen. This proposal was rejected, how ever, due to the hazards volved and the board decided to advertise for bids. Board mem- bers then decided receiving 550 was a better deal than paying to have the two lots cleared and then attempting to 'make use of the vacant property. When the property was accept- ed as a gift by a former boart of education, Santino warned it was a "white elephant." Forbes said this morning he had entered into a contract with the Bay Construction Co. to demolish the old building, starting Aug. 15. Forbes, in addition to his real estate business, is president of the Serv-All Corporation. "We're going to put the lot back into the resi- dential d i s t r i c he declared "and in addition to the duplex we hope for a nice house next door." Forbes said that from what he has learned, the old hospital was constructed in 1908. MONDAY EVENING, 'AUGUST 6, 1962 Of F SHORE WEATHER From Cape Blanco to. Point Conception: Winds mostly west to northwest B-18 Knots today, tonight and Tuesday, but southerly 10-20 knots Cape Mendoclno northward loday. Overcast and' local A lew showers In Ihe extreme north today. HUMBOLDT BAY TIDES (Pacific Daylight Time) Dl A.M. Ft. P.M. Ft. A.M. Ft. P.M. Ft. 5 1.2 t 4.1 2.4 0.4 2.9 IQc Per Copy 28 Pages Today i MARILYN E DEATH BY 'SUICIDE TEAM' Tuoiumne Blaze Destroys Lumber In Struck Yards TUOLUMNE (UPI) A huge, pre-dawn fire destroyed lumber in three warehouses of Ihe Pick- ring Lumber Corp. in Tuoiumne loday and posed a threal to Ihe town. Firemen from as far away as Oakdale, 40 miles from Tuoiumne, fought the blaze which broke out at 4 a.m. The fire Was contained in the lumber yard, bul firemen said a change in wind direclion could send it out of the yar" into the town. Between 10 and 12 million board feet of lumber stored in the ware- houses were destroyed by the blaze, which was visible through oul a wide area. Twenty .engines and an estimaled 150 men were battling Ihe fire. No injuries were reported. The warehouses, part of the West Side division of-the Pick ring Corp., have been idle since April 19 due lo a slrike by mill workers. Arthur Miller Will Not Attend Monroe Funeral HOXBURY, Conn. (UPI) Playwright Arthur Miller, whose brains-.nnd-bcnuly marriage to nc- tress Marilyn Monroe ended in divorce last year, said today he was' "dreadfully shocked" by the news of her death. Miller, who has since remar- ried, said In a trembling voice at his farm hero that he had not been In touch with his former wife for "nboilt a year." He said be.did not-plan lo go lo Los An gclcs for her .funeral. "I'm not he said halt- ingly. "She's really not there any I'm ,afrnld.. .1 not Ixs appropriate lo mourn her 'that way." more., would ooo Ma Sees 'as __ New On For Ban he SAN QUENT1N (UPI) -A (UPI) Depu- a[ appeal to the U. S. Foreign Minister Valerian Zor- a Court was expected to be said today lhat an American on today by attorneys for in position on the number murderer Elizabeth Ann on-site inspections necessary to fl_ scheduled to die Wednesday a nuclear lest ban trealy vn San Quentin's gas us greal hope" for a solu- Attorney S. Ward Sullivan the documents for the new commenls came after v_ "should be ready" today. United States told Ihe 17-na- we'll have to locale a justice Disarmamenl Conference lha [o the Supreme Court and ask resumption of nuclear for a stay of execution while "underlines the urgency" for petition for certiorari (review quick agreement on a 1 the full court) is being ban. he said. 1 Mrs. Duncan, 58, is Soviel delegate virtually re- to leave Corona Women's the new American position Tuesday for the motor trip of a, most 500 miles to San before it was formally pre-senled to the conference. She will be accompanied by said U. S. Ambassador Ar- 11 nurse and two San H. Dean had. spelled out t American thinking to him She and two farm a preliminary fashion" Sun- e Luis Moya, 28, and Augustine _" donado, 23, were condemned will, of course, give U 5-. the murder of Mrs. American position a thor- pregnant daughter-in-law, Zorin sail e Duncan, 30. Mrs. Duncan we have no great hopes, for 3 found guilty of hiring the United States is continuing lo men to slay the wife of her lo old principles which are d Frank, in acceptable." x Sullivan said he and other skelched Ihe broad ou torneys had been working on of the American change in new appeal since Thursday formulated last week i e Gov. Edmund G. Brown and by President Kenned s California Supreme Court both his during a 90- ected moves to spare Mrs. meeting Sunday. They another meeting today. Sullivan said his appeal to is opposed to any on-sile high court was based on the in a lesl ban treaty. points as the petition denied the conference resumec week by the stale Supreme morning. Dean told the dele- argumenl that Mrs. that the new Soviet series was under heavy dosages of Sunday was furlher evi- bilurate drugs at her thai tests in all environ- trial and unable to cooperate should be prohibited as defense attorneys. soon as possible. Sherri Pleads I Abortion In STOCKHOLM An operation will become a ma- i ican mother pleaded for an one. ergency abortion today 'on Has Reports grounds she will suffer a in the hands of the breakdown" if she bears a whose identily Mrs. Fink- formed refused to are re- Mrs. Sherri Finkbine of from Iwo American psychia- nix, Ariz., asked a Swedish and three American obste- tor to appeal on her behalf to urging the termination of state medical board which has pregnancy. power to terminate a psychiatric reports state if it could lead to mental Mrs. Finkbine would be in The 30-year-old television of menial collapse if she former (ears her unborn baby lo carry the baby the full been crippled because .she the tranquilizer thalidomide in if. she had a mental break- vulnerable early stages of what would be the effect our other four Fink- Thousands of malformed ask'ed, before his wife left hnve been born to mothers her appointmenl. many countries who used the Finkbine will have lo un- before its- tragic effect on the examinations by Swedish man foetus was to confirm Ihe American Took 30 All Ihe reports will then "My wife look 30 tablets submitted to Dr. Kurl Ocster, her doctors in America ,of the abortion bureau of there is a 20 to 80 per cent slate medical board for ac- lhat the baby would be sold Mrs. Finkbinc's husband, bert. "It: seems incredible anyone would want us to gamble on those Day To Pay The Finkbines flow here Sunday from Los Angeles after they ind failed to -obtain 'an Taxes In Arizona and had run Irtlo that today is the last ble gelling a visa' for Japan. Mrs. Finkbine Immediately to pay city p'ro'perty- taxes vllhout penally .was given this tacted Hie Swedish woman: by Oily Finance Direc- who Is handling her cnse LcRoy Slarkcy. The office will because she Is in the 12lh open .until 5 p.. m., Starkoy of her pregnancy and unless or the (axes may bo mail- abortion cnn be performed In wilh: the, postmark before next few days wlmt now is a Mysterious Facts No Suicide Note Found; Beautiful Slar Reached For Telephone--Too Late! HOLLYWOOD "suicide team" of specialists will pro the last days of tempestuous Marilyn Monroe, 3C, to determine the star took her own life wilh an overdose of drugs, the coroner office announced today. The body of the beautiful blonde will be held at county morg while the consultants study the case "to be certain scientific fac are discovered." The star's half sister, Mrs. B ersOna! level was that of actor Dean Martin, a close friend. "I just can't believe it.. .1 just an't believe he said. "She a wonderful person and a vonderful lalent." Marlin was Miss Monroe's co- lar in Ihe film "Something's Got o Give." The 36-year old actress fired and the' film shelved ecause of. her frequent absences rom the set. French actor Yves Montand, starred with Marilyn in Let's Make Love" and was nked with her romantically, said St. Paul de Vence, France, larilyn was "a good most beauliful woman in the movie world." "I was happy and proud to ork with Montand said. Her death affected me as it hurt I those people who applauded er. Suicide is a terrible drama itself. It .is even more so when concerns a woman, and what woman! The most adored, and e unhappiest, too." Actress Susan Strasberg, a ose acquaintance of Miss Mon- e, said in Rome, "She was an tremely talented woman who as just beginning .to do the ings she wanted to do. She anted to .work in the theater id..." Miss Strasberg was un- >le to contain her grief and mid not go on. Strasbcrgs Arc Grief-Stricken Her parents, Paula and Lee rasberg, who coached Miss onroe in drama at their New ork Actors' Studio, were grief- ricken also. Strasberg, preparing to fly om New York to Hollywood for e funeral, said, "For us, Marl- n was a devoted- friend, a. col- ague, a member of our family it is difficult to accept the-fact iat her zestful life been end- by this dreadful accident." Comedian Allen, -deadly said, "Marilyn's death lould lead us to ponder the nin- rlallstlc values that -character- a our way of life. She bad id money after which we are tight to lust. But they led h4 the   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication