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Eureka Humboldt Standard Newspaper Archive: September 23, 1961 - Page 1

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Publication: Eureka Humboldt Standard

Location: Eureka, California

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   Eureka Humboldt Standard (Newspaper) - September 23, 1961, Eureka, California                               Humbojdtjtgte Opens Grid Season Tonight sp.m) Vol. 228-Phone HI 2-171 I EUREKA. CALIFORNIA, SATURDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 23, 1961 WEATHER FORECAST f? Gw.er.hy fair loday, tonight and Sunday. SMgMly High boUi iayj JO-M M" thj few tonljhl NoMhwnttrly wlrrfi iJki j olhtrvrlse llshl aod Vftrlabla. Precrpllalkxi: J< hour amount 0 To dale Ihlj season u To Dili dile itaion  rokers. Tiie brokers, who have been hree hours behind" the New York icker, will be four hours behiix starting Monday. When the stocl market opens in New York at N a.m. EDT, it will be 6 a.m. PST n San Francisco. The most confusion attendant to he time change apparently wit bo in'Nevada, which returns to tandard lime Sunday. Some Ne- ada counties are on Mountain ime, others on Pacific Time. incoln County will.be on both. Sunday's clock moving, how- ver, will wipe out confusion' in regon. There, parts of five coun- es in the Portland area' have seen on daylight time while the est of the stale was on standard me.'After Sunday all Oregon will e on standard, time. But there still will be confusion bout the time' of day in Virginia. Some Virginia communities are n daylight time officially, others dopted it illegally. Some went off aylight lime Sept. 1. Others will o off Oct. 1, Oct. 14 and Oct. 28. West Virginia will be on day- ghL time officially another month it voters in Moundsville, W.Va., lose to revert to standard time arting Sunday. Most of the Midwest lias re sed to switch to daylight time, ut of areas which have, mosl _ So Jou're Win Your Clock! You think YOU'RE puzzled about all this end-of-Daylighl-Saving-Time business and which way to turn the clock? Then consider the dilemma of poor Miss Allison got troubles! The clock on the wall shouldn't pose too much of a problem but the one in her hand! No matter which way she turns it, something is bound In come out backwards! Be that as it may, all normal clocks should be turned BACK one hour tonight 11 not revert lo standard lime I Oct. 23. Wisconsin will go ick an hour Sunday, however. in a complaint issued by the dis rict attorney's office. Judge Robert .N. Conners se iail on Cole at cash o property bond, with Pnbli Defender Harold L. Hammom lamed as defense counsel. Preliminary hearing on the cou- )le felony charges was set for m. October 2. Cole was unaware that the Mai ney vehicle, which had crashed nlo the rear end of the truck nd became hooked, was being ragged until he was slopped by (her persons at the 17fh Slrce signal, aid. Ihe Patrol report de Gaulle Again Warns Free World LANGOGNE, France (UPI) 'resident Charles de Gaulle today arned the free world again that must not retreat before Soviet ireats. De Gaulle arrived here by train t a.m. (o begin the third ay of a four-day "whistle-stop" iiir of southern France. Presidential sources said De aulle planned to meet the heads if French political parties. Tues ay in Paris, presumably to dis iss his promise lo relinquish his emergency powers lis monlh. Dedication Of Social Security Oftice Tuesday The new office of Ihe Social curity Administration in Eureka will be dedicated in ceremonies Tuesday at Third and K Streets. The ceremony will see Congress- man Clement W. Miller cut the ribbon. He also is scheduled lo make a brief address prior to the open house in (he 2250 square- foot building. Tlie program, over which C. f. Goodwin, president of the Greater Eureka Chamber of Commerce, will be master of ceremonies, in- cludes: Remarks by Carlos L. Hunsing- :r, district manager; greetings by Henry A. Terheydcn, Eureka may- or; remarks by E. M. Pcllerscn, chairman of (he Humboldt Boarc of Supervisors; remarks by Scn- alor Carl L. Christenscn; remarks by Assemblyman Frank P. Bclot- rcmarks by Andrew Genzoii of the Humboldt Times; introduction of special guests Sam Kelsey, Lu- hcr Hayes and Toma Matajcich; dedication by the Rev. Oscar F. Link, pastor of the First Metho- dist Church. The ceremony will take place eel Julien said. "The reports yes lerday were so encouraging." Shipping Strike Threat Postponed SAN FRANCISCO (UPII A threatened strike against West Coast shipping has been post- al 9 a.m., with the open house (o ollow. TAX .MEETING MONDAY The new Humboldt Economy -caguc, (ax study group, will meet londay night' al 8 o'clock in the City Council chamber to discuss membership drive, as well as mendmcnls to the by-laws. Rob- rt Stach is president. Last Survivor Of Hammarskjold Plane Dies NDOLA, Northern Rhodesia Jnlien, American U.N. guard injured in (he air crash that killed Secretary' Gen eral Dag Hammarskjold, died to day. Julien's death increased lo 16 he number of persons killed in Ihe still-unexplained crash of Ham- marskjold's special DC6B seven miles north of here. II also elim- inated the last hope of gelling an eyewitness account of the crash. The other 15 persons aboard the plane were killed outright. Julien's wife Maria was at his bedside in a hospital here when ho died before dawn today. The American had been report- ed making headway against his injuries, said to include broken legs and burns affecting 30 per cent of the surface of his body. Friday nighl, however, doctors said he had suffered a relapse. (In Maiden, Mass., Julien's mother wept when told her son had died. had such Mrs. Mar Nikita Khrushchev On Peace Kick Once Again PARIS Soviet Premi. Nikita Khrushchev promised in interview published today Ih; West Berlin's links with Ihe We vould remain intact. He said til vould be written into any Sovie 3erman peace treaty and regi ered with (he United Nations. "We want peace, peace, pcac all war is Khru shchev was quoted as saying i a three-hour talk recently wit Trench ex-Premier Paul Re and. The interview was pub ished in today's issue of th ewspapcr "Figaro." "I emphasize that this questio f communications ought fo be rovided for in a treaty betwec Cast and Wesl Khru hchev said. "And more precisely should be determined in a docu mcnl defining (he status of Wes international act cer poned until Monday. Postponement of the strike, which was scheduled lo start at noon Friday, was ordered by Capt. Robert Durkin, president of :he Masters; Males Pilots West Coast local. Durkin said the walkout, which would have idled 136 vessels oper- ated by 13 companies, was post- poned because of a technicality under which a laft-hartley injunc- tion will not be formally dissolved lunlil afler ll a. m. EDT Monday.! Santa Rosa Youth Gets Life Term For Slaying Girl SANTA ROSA fUPl) Dean Ross, is, was sentenced today lo life imprisonment for tire fatal slabbing of his schoolmate, Dor- ecn Harris, last Aug. 14. Sonoma County Superior Judge Charles McColdrick passed the sentence on Ross' plea of guilty, and ruled (he slaying was corn- milted during en attempted rape in the girl's home in nearby iraton. He will be eligible for parole after serving seven years of his sentence. Judge McGoldrick said Ross, a landsomc church choir boy, slabbed Miss Harris 27 limes, licked her and boal tier and left her nude body in Ihe washroom of her home. fainly registered with Ihe Unite ul jeopardizing ils "vital rights. The U. S. spokesman in Berlin stated: "There have been no slatemenl made relaling fo any changes i policy, which policy ha never recognized any right of con rol or supervision by East Ger mans of their corridors or allied access lo Berlin." Fallout Stations Open In Siskiyou YREKA (UPD Three fixed adiological monitoring stations ent into operation in Siskiyou ounly Friday, the first of a nef- ork of 47 slalions planned in alifornia. The stations are being pperoJed y Forest Service rangers at Mt. e.bron, Sawyers Bar, and Happy imp. Fallout readings will be (akqn acli Friday at 5 a.m. Above nor- aJ readings will bo reported lo e county Civil Defense Office. Two East Berlin Women Escape; Leap Into Net BERLIN (UPD- Two elderly omen leaped into a West Ber- n fireman's net from a third oor window lo escape from East erlin, West Berlin police report d today. At least 13 other East Berliners ed to West Berlin during the ghl, police said. The women, one 57 and the oth- r 63, leaped from an East Berlin Jarlment building fronting on a est Berlin street. West Berlin remen caught them in a safety :t while Communist police (vo- )s) looked on wilhout shooting. "Al last a couple of vopos who have nol yet forgotlen Ihat they are German one West Berlin witness said. Another vopo along (he East West city border also apparently remembered. During darkness h sprang over (he barbed wire nea. Ihe Brandenburg Gate and soughl asylum with West Berlin police. Cuban Pilot Lands In Mexico, Quits MEXICO CITY Cu- bana Airlines pilot landed his plane here Friday and said he vas quilling his job because he vas "fed up wild Ihe regime of idel Castro." The pilot, Ernesto B. Pedrozo Villamieve, 39, said he would Council Session Tuesday On Police Parking Control City Council consideration of In addition to the 6-30 special returning enforcement of the meeting and study session parking meter ordinance to the on Tuesday night City Council police department will be given men will hold an executive ses- Ttiesday a I a special session at p. m. Orvil Wilson, council president, said (he call rcsullcd from talks with Councilmen Allan McVicar and A. M. Bistrin, with the meet- ing lo be held an hour before the study on of Tydd street to accommodate low rent housing units. He said the action resulted from the summoning of Finance Director LeRoy Starkey into court Wednesday over Ihe city's refusal to honor dismissal of three parking tickets issued a juror. Wilson has taken Ihe position parking tickets are a police func- tion, but Councilman Barrel Nor- berry pointed out enforcement was moved to the finance depart- ment in on effort to bring the en- tire dollar fine into city coffers Previously, ll per cent had gone toward the costs of operating the enforcement was justice court. Parking turned over lo the finance de- partment August 16, and two meter maids are now engaged in lagging cars. Federal workers have been exempted from the meters and the council is now working on a system whereby public utility and repair trucks may buy meter hoods and slickers for greater convenience. With a council majority of Wil- son, McVicar and Bisirin in favor of reluming (he operation to the police department, it would ap pear that such action will be automatic. Settlers Ban Latest Offer ByDeGaulle ALGIERS (UPI) _ FVeneh s lers returned, a resounding "no Friday night to President Charl de Gaulle's.latest proposal to gi lo the Arabs. The clatter of pots and pan pounded in the three-and-hvo-be nythm of the settlers' "Frew Algeria" slogan, re sound e "rough the streets of Algier Consfantine and Bone in tok support for the anti-Gaullist cai paign of the rightist "seer army" underground. No demonstrations were repor ed in Oran, metropolis of Wester The underground called for th emonslralion in leaflets circula ed lo news agencies and newspa oers Friday. De Gaulle's foes followed it u 'riday night by pirating about 3 minutes lime, from an Algier elevision broadcast for the sec nd successive night. Friday night's transmission wa ad, and the voice of an uniden fied underground spokesma as barely audible. The pirated air (ime was use broadcast an Arab-languag ppeal to Algerian natives and I cpeat a speech by ex-Gen. Raou alan, but they went largely un eard because of static. Salan, a former French com ander-in-chief in Algeria low heads the "secret as sentenced to death for hit, art in the abortive army cou] wre in April. ion Wednesday night over lion of the city planning depart- ment. The Brown Act, drafted lo prolect the public from secret meetings, enables (he lo close its doors to the public for discussion of personnel matters. The city's weed abatement pro- gram, anotlier subject of contro- versy, wil' day. Fire udiuiu mi> Beth ,-uid Ernest Prater of Hie city engineer's office said crews will begin work on the west side of Broadway, moving easl. It will take a month to complete the project. Property owners who have clear-. get under way Tues- marshal Harold Me- ed Iheir lots were reminded to call the division of engineering m city hall, Hillside 3-7331, ex- tension 46, Monday through Fri- day, between 8 a.m. arid 5 p.m. JIcBeth noted that in 1959, the year befor the weed abatement program was adopted, the fire department answered 120 grass fires. In I960, the first year of the program, there were only. 63 calls and so far this year there have been just 23. McDeth said that 12 of these were controlled burns that had got out of con- trol. Congo Move For Katanga LM. cave for Miami, where his family s already living. He told news- men he !iad a U.S. visa to enter Florida. Russians Explode I5lh in The Air WASHINGTON- (UPI -The Sovie Union Friday exploded its !5th nuclear device in the atmosphere since Sept. l. The blast was reported by the Atomic Energy Commission which said it had an explosive force "on the order of a megaton" or one million tons of TNT. It (ook place in the vicinity of Novaya Zemlya, the Soviet Arctic esling site where several of the renewal tests have been con- ducted. The United States has conducted wo underground test slwts sinco he Russians broke off nuclear est ban talks and resumed their weapon shots. LEOPOLDV1LLE Con- Jo government threat to "use ila own means" to recover-Vindepend- enI" Katanga bly by'attempted eohquest-ppsed a grave new problem for UN officials today. Observers said any government attempt to seize Katanga probably would lead to new fighting in the mineral-rich province, making it necessary for the Uhiled Nations to intervene. The Congo threat, in a letter sent Friday to U.N. civilian'chief Sture Linner, did not specifically mention force, but observers said there were few other means at the disposal Leopoldvilla regime. At the same time, the Congo army was reported building up ils forces on Ihe approaches lo Ka- tanga. Three planeloads of Iroops were said (o have flown from here to Luluaubourg, in the generaldi- -ection of the "seceded" province. Olher reports said troops led by Uaj. Gene Victor Lundula, com- mander of Vice Premier 'Anloine Gizenga's Stanleyville army, were marching through Kiv.u Province oward norhtern Kalanga. The government's letter to Lin- ler reflected disiplusionment over he failure of U.N. efforts fo seize Katanga, which ended with a ease-fire leaving President Moisa Tshombe in effective control of the rovince. Berserk Man Slays Six GREENWOOD, Miss. berserk Negro burned his house Thursday night and then opened re with a high powered rifle on eighbors coming (o his aid. Six were killed and three wounded before he. was ain by a posse. More than 230 men, arrned with ubmachinc guns, shotguns, rifles nd pislols, riddled the "killer, 'iley Crump, with huilHs hen he was found wounded on he porch of a nearby house. Officers said Crump, a retired borer who lived alone, "went end set fire lo his house nd a nearby shed. He then hid in a com Held W-' nd the dwelling and shot 'nil eighbors, inclining his'sister, ilh a they'ran up to fie house to offer assistance. Two white'men, Jim Bcdings- M. 39, Oil City, Ln., and Midori veiio, 20, Livingston, La., ished to the aid of Crump's vio- mes and were also shot.'They ere hospitalized In good cortdj." n.   

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