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Corona South Riverside Bee Newspaper Archive: October 13, 1887 - Page 1

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Publication: Corona South Riverside Bee

Location: Corona, California

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   Corona South Riverside Bee (Newspaper) - October 13, 1887, Corona, California                                 'J'. /  VOLUME 1. SOUTH RIVERSIDE, SAN BERNARDINO COUOTY, CALIFORNIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1887. NUMBER 20.  3PpK SALE ON EASY TERMS;  S3,000 Acres of the fiamously  IS NOW IN THE MARKET IN TEN ACRE TRACTS. THOUSANDS OF ACRES ARE  MOIST LAND AMD NO IRRIGATION,  And mny be made IMMEDIATELY PROFITABLE by cultivating'garden vegetables, alfalfa, etc. The immense size of the ranch enables buyers to choose tracts exactly «uit«d to vegetublea and alfalfa; to oranges, limes, and lemons; to olives, grapes,  pears, prunes, peaches, plums, apples, berries; to walnuts and other nuts-  all staple products with steady and imi^roving markets.  f IfUr^EARINa ORimARis^^^^  Atwater &  GET PRICES AT  Aregrowlngthriftly WITHOUT IRRIGATION on lands immediately adjoining the dryest part of the Chino lands. No other lands in the State give surer guarantee of the LARGEST PROFITS (at so small a co^t) realized in the growth of vegetables and all citrus and deciduous fruits, and from ,  $200 TO $1,000 FER ACRE ARE REALIZED  , In different parts of the State from many products.  The Soil is of Unegualed Fertility.  It is mainly decomposed vegetable matter, with sand enough to prevent baking ~ in dry ¿hd'becoming muddy in wet weather.  Moistwce Rapidly Rises to the Surface.  Thé whole tract is siupoth, without brush and ready for the plow, withoutgulches orrocsk, With a uniform slope of 20 to 40 feet to the mile, just right for best drainag without washing  AKTpiAN AND SUEFACE WATER  1« plentiful, pure and soft. Artesian is flowing from wells 150 to 300 feet on different parta of thé trsct, and an aîwndance of unfailing surface water from 6 to 18 feetr More artesiamtrells are being sunk. Plentiful supply is assured. The" whole tract lies near Pomona and Ontario, in San Bernardino County, which has fine public improvements, cash ahead and enjoys the Lowest Tax Rates.  THE TITIiE la A^ PERFECT.  RAILROAD FACILITIES are good and will soon be better. Depots of the two'great ovmlakd Limes are near. Surveys have been made through the heart of the tract ,bv the Ppinpnn & Elsinoro and Southern Pacific conipanies, and . a railroad ' wiH Boon be built eonnectinp directly with two compeiing overland Unes, Insuring Low Fahes and Fbekìuts to all inlajid and seaboard cities iii ,, ■ t|ie United States.  The Town of CHINO  Is eUgiblr located in thè centre of the tract, with large lots;, broad streets; alleys and reserva'tiona for Spacious Parks, ll will h;ive steam and motor roans ahd artesian  wutcr. It is certain to be ' .»  THE BUSINESS CENTER  For B large extent of the richest land in California. The tract now offered will SUPPORT 2000 FAMILIES. Buildings are going up. Many are decided upon, with newspaper, bank, etc. The hi#d is offered at Vehy Low Pbices at which High IicTEREaT can be made upon the cost. No other equally valuable land is offered so cheap. Prices are sure to rapidly advance. iE^" The mo.st critical insj^ection ia invited  HOME-SEEKERS, INVESTORS, AND SPACULATORS  Bhoflld examine this propertj-before purchasing. One-third cash and balance in one - . .and two year.i at 8 per cent, interest.  Carriages and drivers alw.iy3 ready tQ show the property.  RIGHAD GIRB, Fropritor.  POMONA, CALIFORNIA.  RIVEBSIDK HARNESS CO.  = At theii aew quarters have juit received the largest and finest assortment of  HarnesSr Saddles; Whips, Robes,  ■ . Blankets, "Etc., Etc.,  'Ever hrought into Sail Bernardino Coimty. Call and examine their Stock in the  HAMILTON BLOCK, Riverside, Oalà.  A. A. WOOD,  Wholesale and Retail Dealer in  Stoves, Hardware & Tinware,  Crockery, Glassware, Agate-iron ware. Pumps, Gfts-pipe, Water-pipe, Wagons and Agric^tural Implem jkinds.,  Roormo and Plumbing a Spkciai-ty.  Main St.,  Riverside, Cala.  MAMMOTH CARRIAGE REPOSITORY  Riy£R$iPE, GAXIF.  ^ ——■  Carries th^ largest stock in the Courtty of the celebrated  COLUMBUS^ BUGGIES,  Surr?jrs, Phastons, Carriages and the Renowned Eamsbur3?vWprk, in all its Novel Patterns.  WithTHolbw Steel Axle, the best Wagon on,wheels..  Farming Inipleqients of all kinds. The very best in thè market. Manufacturing and Repair shops located on Orange street, off Eighth. Carriage Pàint shop in connection. Esti-jDa:tes given on all classes of,?work. Respectfully,  CLARmCi; STiTW  Subdivision of  LÛT 8, BLOCK 44,  South Eiverside.  & Cover's  DEALERS IN  -AT-  SOUTIT RIVERSIDE-Thc centre of a large citrus belt. AVater piped through the tpwh and colony. These Lots are .situated on Main street. We guarantee to pipe water to each lot, and to grade the streets.  TERMS OF PAYMENT-$25 cash, ^25 the day of drawiiij;, which is to take jilace one week after alUots are sold and notice given each purchaser; $75 in six months, and $76 in ont year; the last two payments to bear interest at 10 per cent, from day of drawing. ^l^Every lot a prize.  We also have desirable property -in and aboyt Rivej-side which will advance 50 per cent, in h year's timé. Those wishing to buy or sell real estate, should call on  Atwater & Dudley,  Rivebside, California.  MEDICINES,  YARNISHES,  BRUSHES AND WALL PAPER.  RIVEKSIDE, Cal.  A. v. GILBERT, Pbesident.  A. H." ÍÍ AFTZaER, Cashier.  L. C. WAITE, VicK-PitEsniENT. A. HAEBERLIN, As.st.'Casuikr.  CAPITAL, $50,000.00.  I  Pii^ersicie, Ca.1.  DON'T FORGET THAT OXJlSTID Iinin BROS.  THE STATIONEiRS. IS TITDES HEJLXX^TJTViaTjfLK-S IFOie  School Books & supplies. Fine Stationery a  Specialty.  wm Knock 'Em Out.  The Southern California papers are vexing themselves unnecessarily about the correspondence in the New York Herald. That paper may berate the country , as much as it pleases, but as long as the State continues to advertise itself by sending to the East daily huge quantitiés of California products the people will turn their faces in this direction. A fruit-stand on a New York tlioroyghCare filled with our fruits will stand off fifty letters. A bo.x of the best California raisins will knock oút a Herald editorial in one round, or a pile of navel oranges from San Bernardino is emphatic enough to answer ten columns of abuse.—San Francisco Chronicle.  Southern California Früit.  Citrus Fruit Statistics.  The biennial report of the State Board of Horticulture has information relating to the number of fruit trees and vines in the State, which is of considerable interest. Oranges are grown in 3G counties  The Sacramento Bee is laboring very diligently to convince its few reader^s tTiat fruit does not grow in Southern California.  This end of the state is not large, but let us see what we do raise. This year Southern California will produce 500,000 boxes of raisins— one half the raisins of the state.  Our orange crop will amount to 3,000 carloads—a tfain load per day for 200, days, as against possibly two carloads from northern and central Califonvia. The jyeach and pear crop of Southern California ia quite large, as is also its apricot crop.  Fresh fruit has not bocn shipped East to any great ejctent in summer because our canneries and driers have paid good prices and taken most of the. crop, and our people could dry tlieir fruit in the cheap sun heat with so little expense that they preferred to market the dried fruit in preference to the fresh fruit. When Los Angeles and San Beruivrdino counties ship 3,500 carloads of oranges and raisins, at a time when they con-  of the 52, lemons, in 30 and olives in 31, while Mono is the only coun- j tain but one-tenth of the population ty recorded in which the pear and ! of the stAte, how much fruit ought  , í D.'ÍAKE'S OLD STAND. MAIIST STREET, RIVERSIDE.  iä  peach do not thrive. Butte and Placer counties, in Upper Califor-tiia, have more orange trees than Santa Barbara or San Diego. The foliowing tables show the number of trees growing in the state in 1886 according to the reports of the county assessors, San Francisco being omitted : Lemon, 78,852 ; orange, 983,423; olive, 93,179. Los Angeles county leads in oranges and lemons with 729,865 and 55,620 trees'respectively. San: Diego had 2773 orange and 1208 lemon trees. On olvye trees Santa Barbara county is ahead with 10,379 trees. Santa Clara county second with 9654, Los Angeles county had 4520, San Bernardino 1150 and San Diego 5571  We presume the report states only the nunjber of bearing orange trees, and even then, the number, outside of Los Angeles county, (253,558) is far too small, as we have more than that in Riverside alone.5—Valfey Echo.  A. KEITH. president. o. T. DYER,  J. A. BIIENNEMAN," Vice Pbest, JU.NAar.n.  E. C. DYER, casiiien.  J. H. GOODHUE, Asst. Casiiikk  How to  RIVERSIDE BANKING COMPANY.  CAPITAL PAID IN ?200.000, INCORPORATED i'EB. 12tii, 1835.  Time Loans Neiollatei on Iiproyeil Real Estate ¡niil First Class Secnrii!es Bonglit and SoliI,  SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO COLLECTIONS.  NATIONAL P.UcK BANK, New York. PACIFIC BANK, Snn Francisco. MERCHANT« NAT'L BANK, Chiciigo., ilRsT NAT'L BANK, Los Angeles.  HIOTEili OLEIsrWOOID,  RIVERSIDE, C AL.  THIS POPULALB EESOST IN SQDTHEBN CALIFORNIA FOR PLEASURE AND HEALTH.  FINE CBIVES 1 BEAL'TIFUL OEANGE GROVES ! MAGNIFICENT SCENERY f  The VISITOR TO riverside will FIND THIS ONE OP THE BEST AND Moat coriifortable resorts ill Southern. Cal forniu. It is surrounded by two and ohe-httlf ucres of orange and otlier fruit trees, shrubbery and luwiis, a quarter of a mile of broad verardas, gliized in, vine sheltered of open sunshine, as may be preferred for promenade. Plenty of sunnv rooms with opportunity for fires and electric bell service. Hotel,supplied with the PUIlISST SPRING WATER.  THIS PROPERTY FOR SALE AT A BAEGAIN.  F. m mcHAHDsojr, FRAma MILLER,  Manager. Proprietor.  s: Furniture:  Market the Crop.  Orange  The cheapest place in the County to buy furniture is at Cunningham's  Hoyt's Block;  IMllllil»!^. I  Main Street, Riverside,  caliroiiuia.  Clothing, Shdes, Hats, Trunics,  F-u-rnislnirLgs.  Everything for men arid boys, largest_ stock in county at  lowest Prices.  Riverside, California.  SAN BERNARDINO ADVERTIHMENTS ;  THE LEADING DRY QOODS STQRE OF  <iSAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.i^  sa  - - OXTB - »»SlXOEE- -  ALL GOODS'MARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES COBLENTZ BROS. PROP^S  206 Third f3t. (KaU Block) - San Bornttrdino, Calif.  The question of how to market the orange crop -is being discussed it Florida more than any other. It is funny, perhaps, but that question does not bother tiie people of California at.all, and why? ■ The laws of trade arc the same all the world over. Whenever any country produces an article the people must have or that commands a ready sale, dealers seek that article and buy it ujp because they know that there is money in handling it. Whenever an article is produced that does not meet with such a ready sale the producer must hunt the market, and thtls is compelled to sell at a disadvantage.  What arc the facts about California and Florida orange markets?  It troubles Florida more to sell its fruit than it does to raise it, .and this in face of the fact that Florida is less than one half as far from the great centers of population as California.'  On the other hand, California or-chardists sell their entire crop of oranges on the tree at big prices and have no trouble. '  What is the conclusion?  California oranges are demanded by the public and Florida oranges-are not.—Citrograph.  the balance of the state to ship? Thirty-five thousand carloads? liow much does Northern and Ccn-trarCalifornla sliip anyway?  Riverside will this year receivc for its orange and raisin crops grown Olì 4,0TO acres (four thousand acres—no miss print) over $1,-000,0p0 (one million dollars) for the crop on the tree and vine. We challenge the' Sacramento Bee or any other paper in the United States or the world to point to a 4,000 acres in a compact f^rm that produces a crop that brings so much monev.—Press.  The Best in the World.  The air of California, tempered by à semi-tropical sun, redolent with ozone and the balsamic fragrance of its mountain forests, has for some years been known to be the most fa,vorable for consumptives, so much so indeed thitt this State has become the natipntll sanitarium for this disease. Now comes strong testirriony from other lands which cannot fail to have its effect. It appears that Dr. Ramsay, the physician having in charge the Belfast ilospital for Consumptives, has lately published a work upon the nature and treatment pf consumption, which has been received by the medical profession as authoritative. Dr. Ramsay takes the ground thçit the disease is in many cases curable and that the method o& treatment should be mainly climatic. After extended discussion of the merits of various localities, this eminent physician gives his verdict in favor of California. At considerable length he dwells upon thé climatic advarit-ages^f^ur State, holding it to be the best ih^the world, thus bringing it to the riot|cé"Ôf all European physicians, and thj-ough them to their patients. The "di^emination of this^knowledge will s^ee(hly become general and cannot Ml^ to benefit the^sick and advance the. interests of the State.-^Exam-iner.  Sraall Holdings.  That our land is usually hold in tracts too large for its most profitable cultivation is a truth that Southern California land owners are beginning to see, and vf^'e^ pect to see loss 40 and <50-at;re tracts and more of 10 and 15 acres. Hired help will not take,care of a place so well as the owner, and the man who does his own work can find plonty to do on 10 acres of orchard or vineyard. Discussing this point an exchanges says:  In France five to ten acres of vineyard is an average holding. The same is true of the Spanish raisin province. In Spain the raisins are dried on the vines children rnd in the work, and go through the vines twisting the stems so as to stop the flow of sap. To this is due the pale purple color of the famous London Layers, the bloom of the grape being all preserved. In France eacli bunch is carefully picked over so as to remove every imperfect berry before the grapes go into the crusher. In both countries the overseer of a vineyard inspects each vijie carefully about once a week to see if it is in perfcct hcaRh. No flock of animals is tendered with closer care. That is the true way to do it. That is what we have to come to; Cut up the land into small holdings. Let vines and trees have good care and they will pay. It is reported that Mn A. B. Chapman, of San Gabriel, netted $500 per acre from five acres of oranges, last year, in spite of the fact that the the trees were run down and required much extra care, involving fertilizing vvifh irhported rriatter procured at heavy expense. There is the result in doing things in the true way ; and it ii^to this, method of treating our vines and trees we are tending. Five or ten acres will furnish a nice home and and produce a good living for a family Rural Califomian.  The elevation is so great that breathing is difliicult in the rarified air and exertion becomes painful.  The land lies at a depression be-lo\v the sea level of many scores erf" feet, so that were communication open with the sea a great inland salt water lake would be the result.  Nothing can be seen in any direC' tion except white, drifting sand. that carrios neither a drop of-moisture nor any vegetation, save the strange, weird forms of gidnt cacti. ■  Water oozing from the .soft soil in every direction makes travel over it di/Ticult if not dangerous, and the lush luxuriance of the,grasses and vogotnblci growth is .something wonderful.  One travcLs at the risk of hie life, for if the water barrels fail he must inPvitaV)ly perish.  Hundreds of artesian woHs send forth a ilow of as cool, sweet water, as one ever saw, and they run on and oi\ forever, making living fountains that glance and (juiver with prismatic hues in the glorious sunshine.  Not a thing will grow on the parched, sterile, alkali-cursed soil.  The pine and the palm, the apricot and the apple, the peach, pear and prune, guava, pomegranate, fig, loquat, lime, lemon and orange,  grow and fiourish and bear.....frart  side by side, and the grape, in more than a hiindred varieties, may be found among all.  These paradoxes might be indefinitely multiplied, but enough has been said for one lesson. All these thiiVgà tire true, and true of a single county. What, then, may be the apparent paradoxes of fifty-two" counties, lying along the mighty Pacific, STretching for 700 miles north-Avest by soutlieast, and carrying on her eastern border a mighty ehitin of mountains whose lofty summits are ever crowned with, snow? What wonder our Florida friends cannot understand us? What wonder that perplexity arises when tlic Eastern nvan tries to re-concile the conflicting ¿itatements? Tt liiust be seen, and studied, and traveled over for many hundreds of miles before it will be learned that scarcely anythiiig can be said of California,'good or bad, that is, not absolutely and exactly true.— Citrograph.  Electrie Eailwayn.  It will surprise many to learn that there are now running in this country eleven electric railways, equipped with sixty-eight motors and motor cars. It is estimated that they are now carrying at the rate of three and one-half million passengers a yerir, and when the roads now under contract are completed twi«e that number will be carried.—Ex.  Sulphate of Iron for Moss.  Dr. A. B. Griffiths, F. R. S., has shown that iron sulphate coinplete-ly destroys moss in grass lands without destroying, the grass. According to JL Marguerite-Delachar-lonny, of Paris, 250 to 350 kilogrammes of FeSo4 for every hec-tai-e sullices. Dr. Griffiths also finds that the ferrous sulphate will also destroy parasitic' fungi; and experiments are in progress to test its value as a manure for vines.— Sei. Am.  A Dangerous Name.  Florida Can't Understand It.  The«Redlaiids Citrograph admits that the mercury in Southern California gets up to 100 ° to 110° in the shade, and states that there is never any rainfall from April to November, and yet it claims that the climate is cheap at a thousand dollars an acre.—Orange County, Florida, Reporter.  Really, if wfc had not ^ been a school teacher in our younger days, we should got clear out of patience. B'lt ignorance and stupidity never yet were overcome by such means. So we will turn schoolmaster once more for the benefit of our Florida friend Sj and tell a few demonstrable truths about San Bernardino county, not South California in general :  The mercury every summer runs as high as 135 ° in the shade.  Snow never melts e.vcept on sheltered sunny elopes, and hard frosts are a sure crop every night in the year!  The heat is so intense that for miles no living thing can possibly exist, not oven a horned toad.  All animal and vegetable growths have been killed out by the intense never ending fcold, except a few Bnovif^lants and lichens.  Wife (who hae bepn very silent all through breakfast) Johti Smith, you talked in your sleep last night about a Miss Ford. distinctly heard you say she was a daisy. And you the father of a family? Mother shall hear of this.  John (who iias been to the races)—Miss Ford, my dear, is a horse.  Wife—John, love, let me send you some hot coflTec.—Harper's liazar. •_ . /  One Lake Less.  Honey Lake, in Honey Lake Valley, once a sheet of ^vater big enough to figure respectably in the maps, lias disapjieared, leaving a vast bed of alkali twelve miles wide b^r twenty-five in length. The river which supplied the lake was tapped for irrigatioin, and hence this geographical catastrophe. Tulare Lake will go the same way some day, and, in fact, lit is uncer-taih when tho final California geography can be issued, so much is man doing to alter the face of na-turelin this State.-=^Oaklaiid-,Eu-quirer.  Countryman to Dentist — "I wouldn't pay nothin' extra fer gas. Jes. vank her out if it doe«i hurt.^'  Dentist—"You are plucky, sir. Let me see the tooth."  Countryman—"Oh, 'taint • me that's got the toothache; it's niv wife. She'^l 'bo hero in a minutej.'» —Troy Telegram.  Subecribe for The bije, only^sl!"   

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