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Corona South Riverside Bee Newspaper Archive: June 23, 1887 - Page 1

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   Corona South Riverside Bee (Newspaper) - June 23, 1887, Corona, California                                 VOLUME 1  SOUTH RIVERSIDE, SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, I HUHSDAY, .JÜNE 2:^., ISST.  N UM UER  Becent Books on Evolution.  Overliiiiil Monthly.1  The progrc-is of the doctrino of Kvolntion well illusiraK-'s tlio usual course through which a Ncifiitilio truth must pass. Hints of the itk-a, guusses that struck <-lose toit, arc fouTul oc^casionally in am-ic-nt writer.-i, huí, they lai keil the ilata to enable them to lujjke a clear generalizaiion. The progress of knowledge in geology, /oology, and in embryology, gradually furnished thé materials of the ^/olutionlst, till at the beginning of the century I.amari-k foniiulated the doctrine in a logicid shai>c, and olfcreil iu explanation of his theory of Conscious Effort, which has re-ently been revised and is held by inen eminent in scicpce. Lamarck's sta^mont of H/olutiou, hinvever, met with no wol<Mime, even in the .scientilic world. Who^was ihis Lamarck, that he .shoulil <lispute the authority of the great Cuvierin his special tejriiory ? Thus a siicer was Lamarck's only reward, and he ¿lied unre<'ognÍ7.e(l and in poverty. Re-Wîarch, iiowever, continuel!, and the seed of Kvolntion, once sown, had life in it. Dar-wiii and Wallace, Working indepemlcntly, jirrived at the same point of acceptance of ilie theory; and when the Origin of Species was published in it satislieil Hcienlilic^ jiien that it, opened the most important discussion that they had known since the days of îîewton. It is iinpossible to give here ¡iiiy outline of that discussion, and it would )ie unneiressary, if_ possible; for it is the wlnde history of science for the last twenty-iivc years. All posiiiijns regarding the hypothesis have been taken, anil great names are found on every side. Men have souniied the deiuh.s of the sea for bathy-liifis; others have climbed the Alp-i t<i eon-<luct experiments reganling si>ontancous generation. The whole earth has been searched, anil all sciences have been laid iiiider contribution. No such discussion li;is ever been jiossible before, and it is hard to see how a wider one can be possible here-Jifu'r.  The general reading i>ublic, meanwhile, has been deejily .stirred. That portion of it that likes to bo considered " advam ed," t<Kik up Kvolntion eagerly in extreme forms, liolding it as established fact, while even its <lefciiders claimed it only as a theory t(> l>e tested. The great nias.s of the world, however, looked upon it with suspicion. The r.ihic was brought out. and when read in its jirceonceived interpretations, was found to be antagonistic to the new hypothesis. All the Weight of,the jiultiit and roligiou.s press was at oni'c arrayed in opposition, heaping theodium theoh»gieum on the heads of the iimovators. Men versed in scienee so little as t« know nothing of its methods and its standiioint-s attieked the idea with sueh woapoiH us they had—distortation, mis-C|uotat)on, ridecule, and appeals t<> prejudice. It repre-ented tliat if the doe-trine were true, the Church must fall, and m.'in Ik! left witliout hope.  Itut as the day continued to <lawn, it be-<-:iiiic evident that some concession must be mail«, and it was discovered that even if the iliwirine wei'e esUdili.shed, there would yet Ik-room for religion. The Hible was re-read to «ee how it might be interpreted so as to im-lude the new thought. A shoal of Imoks • fTcring various meihiMls of harmonizing religion ami science appeared. Thisch.inge •if public .sentiment has followed the scientilic discu.ssion; for it was seen that the tide was following constjinlly in one direpti<>n, till at the present time .sfientific men are no lunger engaged in'discttssing whether or no species were evidved from a common stt)ck. hut the iiuestion now is how were .species evolved from their common stock. As the most distinguished scientist on this Coast, I'rofes.sur Joseph Le ("onte, jiuts it, "there is no longtr a school of Evolutionists ainong jscientific men, any moré than there is a Ki-hool of (iravitationists." It eannot be .said that thert; is con'imon consent as yet'on the limits of the doctrine. It is held in the thorough-going form of making the whole univer-e to have bwn evolved from primal «■iiaos, and counting all life, in<-luding man, body and sold, with all his works, as but ]ir(iducts of the process, which is to continue to its highest point, when a period of «lissoIutioii,its converse, is to set in till cha-«IS returns and tlrC cye!e begins anew. It is held in tlié strictly limited form of gnmling that all siiecies of animals and. idant-i were )>roduced by its means from a life germ specially placed on the earth in the fullness of time by the Creator, but denying that juan, or at least spiritual man, is anything other than the immediate creation of (Jod.  In this statement, Darwinism is not to be confounded with Evolution. Evolution is iield by all scientists t)f note in the world, excepting perhaps I'rineipal Daw.son, but Darwinism is denied by all but a limited number, and is not strictly insisted upon by Darwin himself. Organiii Evolution is the iloctrine that differing species are derived by modification from common ¡uicestors. Darwinism i.s an explanation of this doctrine by teaching that the chief means of this modification have been the ¡Struggle for Existence, whicli preserves the favorable ; 4inints of chance variation; or NaturalSe-Icctioti. as the process i.s. called. It ia be-Icived by most scientists that this explanation is inaileiiuate, and needs to be supple-jueuted largely in (jrder to aecoimt for the fiicts." Isolation, Neo-Lamarckianisn», or the theory of; Effort,'and a better under-stiinding of Ûiç variation of offspring by ' ex])loring the laws of Heredity—the.se are the directions from which help iS expected.  .Still from the pulpit luid froiii the~^itublic generally, coiue traces of the old opposition to Evolution, but the old taunts have lost their fre.shness iinti their fore j, the old ridicule falls flat. Sume examples of its survival arc found in the books that are the immediate cause of this article.  One of them is the publication of the r.cdell Lectures delivered by the A.ssistant iUshop of Mississippi on Founder's Day at iîanibiçr, the seat of the Ohio Theological Seminary, and of, Kcnyon College, Of course the worthy bishop is bent on "justifying the ways of (!od to nuin," and he imports into what should be, if.undertaken at all, .a cajm, impartial argument, a warmth of feeling and a loyalty to his understanding of the iniere.sts of the Church that do credit to his heart. It is imposMble to follow the course of his argument here, lie is very sure that " ' Survival of the Fittest' has iiothing to do with creation of ITidveTlT-ns oper:itk'ií; it «•mi ex  amine, would be to render mutation of species impossible," ........" What enables the dog t<i survive on the princii>le.... must be that he beconies in some direction niore of a <log." And the good ]>rel.'itc does not see that here he has conceded the argument, and that, of course, if the dog becoming more of a dog and has been bei'om-ing more of a dog, there must of been a time when he must of been something very different from a dog. Again, the story i-f told of the head of a child's china doll, found twenty-five feet below the surface of the ground in New Orleans, in strata calculated by geologists to be from fifty thotisand to a hundred thousand years old. From this thé dicttim is drawn : " There is nothing so uncertain as scientific i)ieuries, except .scientific facts." Thus, all the evidence of geology goes for naught ! It will be seen that the book is not worth much as a contribution to scientiilo literature;  Of a little higher grade in this respect is the book of Itev. (Jeorgf I). Armstriuig, l>asti r of the First rre.--byti riiiii Chtirch of Norfork, Virginia, Ex-professi r of Cliends-try and (teology in WashingtonJjind Lee Vnivertity. Evolution is given a somewhat fairer st.ilement in this book, but, the iitti-tuile of the author is that of stating but to refute; and in the permanence o{ sjiecies, which he establishes to his oWn satisfaction, he finds a fatal objection to the doctrine. The book is controversial in its tone, which is suflu'ient condemnation of a book of this kind. None the less, it is an improvement (Jii Bishop Thonip.son's book.  It will be noticed that both of these bof)ks are froni Southern pens, and it i.s true that in that part of our country publie .>:enti-ment Is far behind that of the North on this question, as is proved by Ihe.-e books and the recent trial of Professor Woodrow for heresy in believing in Evolution, by the (Jeneral A,-isend)ly of the Presbyterian Clmrch South. There ni:iy still be heard the ancient gibe, ".Darwin m:iy be descended from a monkey, but I'm not." In the North. i)eople and ]>uliiit hsive arrived at a different frame of mind. Witness the following from a book of sermons, by a clergyman preaching to an (.rihodox church. '\No hymn of praise is more enkindling to devimt rapture than the Nebular Hypothesis; and to a religious book than Tlie Origin of SpeciesJ' = Is the .Scripture to blame that when it jioints us back into the past eternity, or ever there Were signs and .se!ison,s. or days, or years, we have had no more apprehension of'the nature of the subject than to try to time" creation by an eight-day clock ?" And yet Mr. IJacon is sufliciently severe on the " atheist religii>n," wherein is " no soul, no .sin, no Savior, and no Ood but incandescent hydrogen, and great is gas !" He wi.rks out a .somewhat ingenious coroUary of Evolution to this effect: If consciousness, will, and benevolence in man are .simple forms of matter or modes of motion, as they must be in the materialist's view, then there may, anil if m:iy. then must, have been in past titernity a time when all the matter and motion in the iMiiverse was in the form of Conscious-ne.ss. Will, and Î<ove. " There can be no bridge from the material over to the spiritual that is not, in every .sense, just as much a bridge Çroni the spiritiial over to the m:itc-rial." .The .sermons in this book ih:it 'are on other siibjccts than Evolution are Weill worth reading, îind would, be worth noticing here, if other books did not claim attention.  The boiik.s so far treated have been by reverend hands. Here is one from that of a physician. Evolution versus Invidution. The polemical form of the title (li.e.S not belie the contents of the book which i.s. .devoted to a refutation of Herbert Spencer and all other agnosiics, pantheists, and aihe.sists. All of these Dr. IJred insists on putting in the same category, despite any protest they may make on the point. He makes the discovery that nothing can be evolved (that is unroHed) that wa.s not involved or included in the previous- condition. In this view evolution means siiiipli-fication, or outward expression <if hidden tendencies, while Spencer's increasing complexity mu.st be obtained by a jiroce.ss of involution. The chicken. Dr. Itred ex-phiins. is far le;Ss complex than the formless protoplasm in the germ of the egg, because that protoplasm contaiiied .soiiiehow In Itself all the law.s by which the chicken was formed. Since, however. Dr. lired's chicken produces further eggs, it will bo seen that his doctrine lends ¡i new interest t<) the ancient question as to which existed first, chicken or egg. Dr. Itred's mental attitude is hardly that of the seeker for truth. Indeed he admits that so sure is he, on the grounds of it.s practical boai;ing, that Teeism is truer than Atheism, that should reason lean' to the other side, he would doubt the value of the reasoning faculty. It is somewhat refreshing in .,a skeptical age, to liiiil a man so thoroughly grounded in the faith. Doubt seems to be no part of this author'.s make up. The confident tone of his mind may be seen from the calm way in which he assumes as a scientific fact, that the government of the I'liited States is the topmost reach of civilization. Of England he cheerfully remarks:, "In England the government ha.s outgrown its name, and a republic might now be e.stab-lished without the shedding of a droj) of Wood. The chry.sidis still renuiins attached to the fully developed insect, but these slender threads will soon be sundered and the new republic will rise on-its glittering wings t<i higher regions of develoiuiicnt. The abolition of primogeniture and all titles would result in a natural collapse of Hjie privileged cdass, anil this would lead by easy^steps to the setting ¡iside of the throne, withoutiauifusion or turînoil of any kind. The presentvincund)ent will, no doubt, bo premitted to retain Uie shadow of royalty, but her grandson wilniever, in any i)roba-bility, sit upon an Eiigljsh , throne." Dr. Ured, it remains to be toli^,-is as confident that Evolution is the mode b.wwhieh the Creator works, as he is of all hi^ other j)ositions.  The one valuable book of all at hand tliat, treat on Evolution, is that by Dr. Conn, Instructorof lUidogy atWesIeyan Univcr-sity., Its value lies in this, that here is a good ex-ainple of the true attitude of mind in which ncioutific qtie.stions shotdd be approached. Doctor f.'onn, it is to be supposed, has his privfife'convictions, and doid^tless they are as strong and a.s oj-thodox as those of any  but his object in writing this book is not to enforce his conviclions on religion, or even on Evolution, but to set beforo the reader the doctrine of Evolution and all its bearings, iu full light. The arguments in it.-^ favor are developed, and the objections to them that are offered from any sotirce. The present.itions are so fair, and the style so liuid, that the reader feels when he finishes the book that he has been put in a position where he can intelligenilv make ui) his own miud as to (be probabiliiv of the ilocirine. If that pn.b.diilily seciii.~ to incline so strongly in favor i f Evolution as to amouut almost to cert:iinty, that result is the fair out(X)me of an im;>artial con.<ideration of the subject, and is the same result that all biit one or two of those most competent to form aii opinion have also reached.  One more word as to flie oppo nonts of the tlootrine. It is liot strange that those who cun read Genesis in no other light than a literal interpretation of the letter of it, find it hard to make it agree with Evolution, and, holding as they do to the word of God, and they think it neeessary to make (iod true, and every man a liar. Their position is a perfeetly • intelligible one, and from their standpoint, no other course than unrelenting oppo.sition is open to them. -Neither is this oppo.silion altogether hurtful to the eause of truth ; for il has forced the Evolutionists to be ver}' cautious, to test their arguments severely^ and to make their progre.'sS a sure one. Thus- it has taken twenty-five years to bring the discu.ssion to its legitimate conclusion, but now that the conclusion is fairly reached, it is one on whicli more confidence can be placed. Ultimate truth is not for finite minds ; absolute truth is impossible in such a question. But no fair consideration, based on a due knowledge of the data, can leave much room for reasonable doubt as to the verity of Organic Evolution.  Slavery in Bräail.  of llie,writer - that 'h;ivc .b'ieu çoii àdcrccl;  Brazil has tho unenviable distinction of being the only Christian na-tion\iii which slavery now exists, though it is to be hoped that the recent measures taken for its abolition will, in no very long time, remove this stain from her escutcheon.  At first, the Indians were enslaved by the Portugese settlers, under the llinisy pretext of desiring to Christianize them. Their captors used to call the expeditions against them, '-going into the forests to rescue Indians."  When this practise was finally prohibited, the planters supplied the places of the natives by negroes from the west.coast of Africa. These slaves were brought over in grqat nuiiibers without opposition, until Portugal acknowledged tho independence of Brazil in 182.5; Then, to the lasting honor of the new State, one of the first acts of its ruler was to sign a treaty with England for the suppression of the slave trade.  The GÖvernment, however, had not the means to carry the treaty into effect, and the importation of blacks accordingly continued, notwithstanding the urgent and oft-re-peated protests of England, and the efibrts of her cruisers. The disgrace to his country from this persistent violation of the treaty wàs keenly felt by Dom Pedro II., when he began to reign.  But the remonstrances of the boy Emperor—he was only a lad of fifteen at this time—had li'tie effect. The slave trade continued to flourish for more than ten years longer, when the extreme vigilance of the English men-of-war, \yh'o ¡Kirsued slavers into Brazilian harbors^ and cut them out from under the guns of their forts, together with the out^ break of the yellow fever, attributed by the terrified people to a freshly landed cargo of „slaves, at last put an eiid to the traflic.  By one of the provisions of the treaty, all negroes brought over after a certain year were to be free, and the English Minister at Kio de Janeiro was now instucted to demand the release of those who were illegally held in bondage. All his cfforte were in vain, although the Emperor again exerted his influence on the side of right and humanity. Still, they were not wholly without effect, since the agitation of this question aroused an opposition to slavery in Brazil, which greatly strengthened by vari-ou^ircumstances.  The ^içTof"these circumstances were the Emuncipation Pruclariiia,-tiop of PresidentM.,incoln, and the necessities of the Pafivguyan war, which-lcHi to the freeing of iiU .slaves  who joined the army. At this time, the Emperor gave his personal slaves their liberty, and many of his subjects followed his ex.Tmple.  Those acts awakened the wildest hopes in the slaves, and to every remotest plantation the glad tidings of coming freedom perietfjited.  Whenever on a holiday tlie- Emperor appeared, the roads wore lined wilh grateful negroes, who, falling upon their knees, niii)lored blessings from heaven upon their redeemer as he j)assed. Our own, poet Whittier caught tho enthusiasm and sang with prophetic fire of the noLle-minded ruler :  "Crowned doubly by man's blessing and (iod's grace.  Thy future is sectire;  Will) frees a people makes bis stattie's jilace  In Time's Viilhalla sure."  AL length, in 1871, the long-'look-ed-for emancipation biU was passed ; but bitter was the disapoint-ment of the slaves and their friends to find that it only declared that the children of slaves Lorn after this time should be free at twenty-one, iind established a fund for the purchase of the freedom of slaves.  Accordingly agitation was begun for a more radical measure, esj)ec-ially in tho northern provinces, where,the slaves are comparatively few in number, with such success that by 1883 emancipation h;vd become tlie one absorbing national issue. By this time public opinion h;id so changed that none dared to advocate slavery on moral grounds. Both parties were agreed in. their desire to put an end to it, but wore divided as to the means by which this should be brouglit about.  The next year a government emancipation bill having been defeated b}' a very small majority in the Chamber of Deputies, it was detirmined.to appeal to the people, if such a term has any meaning in a country where, out of a population of about Ihiiteen millions, the voters nui.ibcr only about a quarter of a million.  As soon as the elections were over, the Emperor called together both houses for the sole ptn'pdse of acting on this matter. Another emancipation bill was introduced and, after some debate, passed, becoming a law September 28, 188-5.  , By its priiicipal provisions all slaves over sixty-frA-e years are uii-c )nditionally freed ; the emancipation fund is largely increased ; and a valuation of slaves according to ages is made, these values (o diin-inish iahnually six per cent.  The advocates of this measure assert that, by its action, slavery will cease in Brazil in 1892. Other carefiil observers, however, are not so hopeful, though none doubt the final tritimph of freedom. It is certainly to be ardently- desired that the day, when it does come, may find still on the throne the enlightened ruler "who, when a boy, struck the first blow which loosened the shackles of his subjects.— Youth's Companion.  Royal Visitors.  The visit to this country of Queen Kapiolani, of the.Havvaiian Islands, recalls the fact that-on many previous occassions have members of royal families set foot on our shores,,^  More than once the free soil of our Republic has been sought by princes in exile. Louis Philippe, afterward King of the Frer.ch, fled from I France when his father, Philippe Egalité, was guillotined, and for S!i^)me time wandered from place to place in this "country, at one time teaching for a living.  After the failure of Louis Napo-lepn'a attempt on Strashurg, he was released on condition that he would come to tho United States. He landed in New York, and lived for some time, almost in poverty, in that city and Brooklyn, meanwhile making a visit to Washington Irving, at Sunnyside on tho Hudson. Those who saw him at that time little imagined thiit he would one day be Emperor of the French.  No European sovereign, howe.ver, has visited the Uuited States while wearing the crown; hut Joseph Bouaparte found a home and refuge in New Jersey, after he had worn successively the crowns of Naples  and Spain. It is probable, indeed that the great Napoleon hitnself would have conie'^to this country had he been able to escape from the hands of his enemies after the erusliing defeat of Waterloo.  But though no European reigning sovereings h;ive paid tlie United .'^tate a visit, the heir apparent to' tlie English crown, atid tlie present head of the royal family of Franco—if France .'iliould ever ag;iin become a monarchy— have done so.  Tlie Prince of Wales made a tour of this eountr}'in 1 S î ), wiien he was eighteen years of ago ; and the t.'onnt of Paris, tlie grand.'^on and heir of Loilis Piiillippe, with his brotlier, the Count of Ch irtres, came here and served for a while in tho Union army, in the early part of our Ci,'il War. Wo are indebted to tho CJount of Pari)i, iiuleod, for one of tho best narratives of tho war that has been written.  The younger sons and daughters of H(!ver;il European potentates have beei^ in the United Stiitos. Tlie Cirand Duke Al(;xis, brother of the present Cztir of Uussia, visited us with a Russian lleet 'many years ago ¡ and two,, of the throe brothers of the Prince of Wales, Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught, and the late Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany, as. well as the Princess Louise, have made a toUr through the United .States.  Two crowned heads, moreover, not European, have been guests 'of the Republic. The most important of these was the enlightened Doin Pedro, Emperor of Br.izil, wlm-took a deep interest in the evidences of our national progress and power. Tho other was King Kabikua of the Hawaiian Islands, the husband of the Queen who has just visited us, who came to the colmtry some twelvQ years ago,  (¿ueen Kapiolani has been well-comed as the royal representative of the group of islands which, situated in the midst of tho Pacific, has long had close relations with the United States in many ways. There is a large number of Americans resident on the Islands of Hawaii, for tho most part engaged in trade.  Many natives of the islands, of the higher class, come to the United States to receive their education. Americans have often oecuiiied high posts of honor and responsibility in Kalakua's councils. The commerce of Hawaii with the United States, moreover, has been more profitable than with any other nation : it amounts to ninety per cent, of its whole trade.  Tlie present population of the islands is about eighty tiiousand. only about half of whom are pure-blooded Hawaiians, and the native race has long been decreasing in number; but Hawaii is saitl to be the only tropical soil on whicli white men can work without in-jury.  Tlie intelligence and good character of the native Hawaiians are undoubtedly due to the work of the An?erican missionaries, who- have long ma:de the islands a special field of labor.—Youth's Companion.  unit. If a man did not work a (luarter of a day, he received no pay. If he worketl over a (juarter of a day, he re-;u!ivo(l pay for half a day, etc. This is unjust to the laboring man who works but an hour and is suddenly called away, [t is eqiially uiiju.st to the contractor who p.ays for half a day  when'ho, onTy reeoiviis but a little  il  over a quarter.  In tho payment by the hour system the hour is made tho unit of measure, and all time is kept by tho hour. If a man works less than half an hour it is not counted. If ho works over half an hour, he is oro(litod with an hour.  Tho number of hours in a day's work doi's not, afl'oet tin; .system at all, and all ooiitraeti>rs reserve the right to work as many hours as is nooos.sary and agreed. Overtime is oroditoil as time and a half, and Simdays as double timo. \ man leaving work without ])ormission is disohargod, but wIioti ho leaves with i)ormission he is paid for exactly tho amouiit of work h(! has aooomplishod. This is all there is to the jiayment by tho hour system. Those who have tried it liko it infinitely hotter than the old method.-  Sanitary News.  -^ • ---  The Excursionists Will Still Come to California.  Bayinent by the Hour.  In the "Declaration of Principles" adopted and i)n,)mulgat(!d by the national association of master builders, it is stated that " this association earnestly recommends to all its aíliliatetl associations to secure as soon as possible the adoption of a system of payment by the hour for all labor performed, other than piece work or salary work, and to obtain the co-o[)eration of associations of workmen in this just and equitaWe arrangement." In some cities where the system of paying for labor by the hour is not in vogue, there is some (piery as to just what the system includes.  In Chicago, ever since the great fire of 1871, nearly all contractoi's have been in the habit of paying for tlieir labor by the hour instead of b^;; the day. By the old cuátom of pacing by the day, still in almost general use, the day was made the unit of time and of payment,^ A quarter of a day was made the «nuvllcíit Jdivision of this-  J. A. Whitcomb, of the excursion agency of Raymond it Whitcomb, is now at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco, and so is Luther L, Hol-den, who was for many years a journalist, but who is now also connected with the e.xeursion, firm. It is known that there has been a large falling oil" in the excursion business to Florida, 10,000 visitors less than the year before having gone to that State last year.  The gentlemen, Messrs. Whit comb and Holden, were seen by a San Francisco Bulletiri reporter recently, and ask^d whether they in-tcndiSd to take their excursionists to Florida next j'ear, or whether they would continue to come to California. ^  Tho answer wai^that the energies of the agency whuld continue in llu; direction of Ijringing first-elass tourists to winter in California, the sight-seeing spring tours continuing ; that their plans wore laid on a still larger scale for the ne.xt season, the facilities for seeing points heretofore unvisited by their jiarties being increased ; and that there was no intention of going to Florida Mr. Raymond has been asked by Florida people, said Mr. Whitcomb, why lie gave Florida the go by. To this lie answered that he considered California a much better health resort.—L. A. Tribune.  The Burning of the Museum of Confucius.  A conllagration whieh took place lately in ¡i remote village of China has destroyed one of tiie most re-markalih; literary and artistic museums in tlu! world. The edifice in (luestion was the ancestral home of the family of Confucius, built centuries ago, near Loo, in the province of Shan-Tung. In this building, generation iifter generation, the "mule heirs of the great Chinese teachei' have dwelt in an unbroken line for 2,500 years, boiiring the title of dukes. With every other family in China, a nobleman's rank must iilways be lower than that of his aiKHii^tor ; for no true Confucian would pre.sume to stand higher than his grandfather, fathor, or his elder brother. In the illustrious " House of Confucius," however, tlii! lofty title of duke passes unchanged except wKei.i-j emperor after emperor adds by royal decree some new phrase of honor to the mime and line of the famous philo-sopher., The tomb of Confucius is a hugh mound, over-grown with-trees, on the banks of tho river Sze, „with carved animals on each cornef and groves of eyjiress trees ranged sole-innly around. The relics of his age, and the rich tributes (»f worship paid to him by generation after generation, since GOO B. C., have all beeiv gathered into this "House of Confucius," lately destroyed. Here were accumulated precious texts on .•tone and marble and commentaries of his ho iks, wonderful carvings in jade and alabaster, jars and vases of jiorcelain, beyond, all price, to say notliing of jewels and gold and silver work s^ent from all parts of the C'elestifii Kulgilo'", and.even by reverential outer"^bi»Tbarians." All, or nearly all, of these^treasures are forever lost by this deplorable  event, whieh has fallen upon China as nothing short of a national calamity. No liberality on the part of emperor or people can replace the vanishi'd memorials of that remarkable teacher.—London Tele-graph., ^ ^ ___  Till-; completion of the N. P. R, R. will be appropriately celebrated at Tacoina July./lth, 5th'and 6th.  R. W. Button is to extend his motor railroad to Lugonia and Red lands. . He has given bonds to do tho work in the sum of $5,000, and is to coniinence within sixty days ; so says the Sonii-Tropie.  Tukkk are 1,4;U),.()()(),000 huinan beings in tho world ; of this number 8.50,000,000 are heathens, 170.000,-000 Mohammedans, 190,000,000 Catholics, 84,000,0t)0 Greeks, 8,000,-000 Jews, and ll(i,00tJ,000 protes-tants.  Tho whisky levy is 1il)00,(M)0,()00 annually. The internal revenue tax oil tobacoo in Ntsw York alone in 187i) oxoeedod $7,000,000. For liquor and tobacoo 225 times as much as is ¡innually spent for missions.—Oisis of Missions.  A UKcKNT writer advises to " always got a whole ham or at least a half one." We usually get ours in large quantities served to perfection, but we won't sit by and allow another to " swallow up" small-sized niouthfuls. The advice i.-^ good.  It has been demonstrated that platinum wire niay he drawn s(t fine as to be invisilile to the naked eye, altliough its presence upon a perfeetly white card can be detee-, ted by the touch, and can be seen by the aid of a small magiiifying glass when the card is held in such a position that tho wire casts a shadow.  The northernmost on the face of tho earth is near Cape Beechey, on a brow of a hill covered with snow. In it is buried the body of a member of Nare's expedition. A large stone covers the dead, and on a copper tablet at the head is engraved a part of the seventh verse of the fifty-first Psalm: "Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow." •  I have read .somewhere the legend of one who, day-dreaming in his chair, beheld a vision, whieh stood before him and beckoned him •to follow her to fortune. He waited sluggishly, ht'oded not her.call nor her beckoning, until at last she grew dim and disappeared. Just as the vision faded he sjirang to his feet and critul out : " Tell me who thou art 1" and received the answer, " 1 am Opportunity ; once neglected, I never retuWi."  "To discontinue an advertisement," says John Wanamaker, the largest advertiser in the world, "is like taking dovyn your sign. If you want to do business you must let the people know it. Standing advertisements when changed frequently are better and cheaper than reading notices. They look more substantial and business-like and inspire confidence. 1 would a« soon think of doing business without clerks as without advertising."  It is said that the presence of glucose in sugar can be detected. Dro]) a handf,ul of the mixture into a glass of cold water. Stir it a few mhiutes, and you will note that the cane-sugar is entirely dissolved, leaving the grape-sugar imdissolved at the bottom of the glass in fluì form of a white, sticky substance, not unlike starch in looks, and (piite bitter to the taste. Do not use hot water in your test, for if you do the whole thing will dissolve.  How doth the giddy youth arise, his gaudy clothes he measures; and forward looks with beaming eyes, to one long round of pleasures. His day dream pictures twilight walks, with one he'll love forever; he thinks of summer eyening talks* while boating on the river. He holds his pen while mankind snores, and writes a tender eonnet, to that bright maid whom he adores, the girl with gipsy bonnet. He asks that maid to bo his wife, while, theyr-are playing tenni», and for thé first timé in his .life he iiuda his jii^me is Deua|8. ;   

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