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Corona Norco Independent Newspaper Archive: January 18, 1973 - Page 1

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Publication: Corona Norco Independent

Location: Corona, California

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   Corona Norco Independent (Newspaper) - January 18, 1973, Corona, California                                 CORONA  85th Year, No. 156  Corona, Califoria Thursday, January 18,1973  Phone 737-1234  12 Pages—10 Cents  Massive industrial parle planned west of Corona  Corona  guilty  FAIRFIELD, Calif. (AP)—A jury today found Juan Corona guilty of the biggest mass murder charge in U.S. history, the Yuba City slayings of 25 farm workers and drifters.  The jury of 10 men and two women found Corona guilty after 46 hours of deliberation which stretched over ei^t days.  Corona's wife Gloria clasped her hand& together after the verdict was read but held back tears throughout most of the long process of reading the 25 individual charges and verdicts.  Tears formed in her eyes as the 15th count was read, some 20 minutes after the lengthy process of reading charges, jury findings and acceptance.  Corona sat beside his attorney Richard Hawk outwardly expressionless. However he tightly gripped the counsçl table between his thumb and fingers.  He glanced briefly at the jury during the 28 minute reading of the verdicts, but he stared straight ahead the rest of thé time.,  The jury notified the court it had reached a verdict at 10:50 a.m. but it was one hour and 48 minutes later before the final count against the 38 year old farm labor contractor was recorded by the court.  Judge Richard E. Patton read each count and each verdict separately and then asked the jury if that was their verdict. Jurors replied "Yes" in unison 25 times.  Hawk asked that the jury be polled indivlâûally alter each of the first three counts, but he waived that right for the final 22.  Hawk then requested a new trial "on statutory grounds," and Patton ordered a hearing on that motion Jan. 29.  Court-martial report upsets Heck's mother  CHULA VISTA, Calif. (AP) — A report that Capt. Michael J. Heck may face a court-martial for refusing to fly further B52 bombing missions over Vietnàm left his mother visibly upset today.  Mrs. John, Heck said a New York attorney telephoned her and said he had spoken earlier with her 30-year-old son.  "If this is true, they cannot muzzle me any more," Mrs. Heck said. "I think I've been duped and misled."  A day after Christmas Capt. Heck, a veteran of 175 bombing flights, went to his wing cçmmander. He said he would fly no more, asserting "the goals do not justify the mass destruction and killing."  WOMAN TALK—No situation is too sacred or profound to prevent a pair of women from talking about other things, as Diane Hilton (left) and Flora Spiegel prove here. The pair appear serious in the picture, but snickers from time to time indicated their conversation was about things other than zoning, tract maps and the electrical code. Past Mayor Tony Bollero and former Councilman Glen Hart were seated directly behind Uie.pair and they occasionally injected comments into the women's discussion.  High-level talks In Paris to be resumed  KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. (ap) — The Florida White House and Hanoi jointly announced today that top-level Paris peace talks will be resumed Tuesday "for the purpose of completing the text of an agreement."  Emphasizing that he was reading language approved by both the United  4 Inches of rain  LOS ANGELES (AP) - Schools and businesses in San Luis Obispo were evacuated, today as a heavy storm which dumped more than four inches of rain since midni^t threatened to inundate the downtown area, police said.  Officers said a iiospital' was flooded and some patients might have to evacuated if the waters continued to rise.  Brash, irreverent show that changed TV to quit  <» HOLLYWOOD (AP) — "Laugh-In," that brash, irreverent show that changed the directicm of television comedy, will not be back next year, Oick Martin said Thursday.  Martin said he and Dan Rowan had taped the flnal show, the 142nd, at NBC Wednesday night.  "We finally put it to bed," he said as he prepared to fly to Las Vegas for a 10-day stand with Rowan at the Sahara.  Martih said "Laugh^In'.' probably would run through September vnth reruns. He said he and his partner would be back on NBC next fall in a new show, "Hie Rowan and Martin Show."  "Laugh-In had so many imitators," he said. "Even though we consider this pait season one of the best written, with nq>erior talent, after nearly six years the form had just become predictable."  Hie decision to kill the show was Rowan and Martin's.  In the past two seas<ms the show had run out of steam, become predictable, lost much of its zest and had disgarded much of the polijtip^l and biting satire of its earlier y^ri. They had gone steadily down in the ratings from their one-time No. 1 position. In late December the ' show was ranked 35.  Martin said he and Rowan had wanted to kill "Laugh-In" this season^ but NBC had asked them to stay on because the advertisiiijg spots had b«^ sold out in advance.  When it premiered in January 1969 "Laugh-In" become one of the most tlilkedabout shows on television. Its brash humor, fast pace and electronic tomfoolery sent it right to the top of the ratings.  It made overnight stars of Rowan and Martin and such newcomers as Goldie Hawn, Arte Johnson, Ruth Buzzi, Judy Came and JoAnne Worley. Virtually all of the original cast has left the show, but Miss Worley returned to the final taping for several cameo appearances.  Two years ago Rowan and Martin split up with George Schlatter, who had been executive producer, and Paul Keyes, a close friend of President Nixon, took the helm. Most of the political jabs, often aimed at the Nixon administration, left with Schlatter.  Martin said the format of their new show had,not been worked out, but he doubted it would be as trend-setiing as "Laugh-In."  ^"It'll be different from anything on television, I'll tell you that," he said, "but it will be hard to go back and top ourselves."  Martihlaid, "The one thing that Dan and I are most proud of is that we'll be in the history books. Instead of just making a lot of money and being successful we'll be in the history books for changing television."  35-acre proposal unveiled  By HENRY LEPPARD Royal American Enterprises, Inc., of Orange, last night removed wra|» from plans for construction of a massive .35-acre industrial park immediately west  of Corona......  The company's intentions were xevealed at last night's city council meeting when it received council approval of its request for light manufacturing pre-zoning of its site. The acreage is situated north of Riverside Freeway and west of Serfas Road adjacent to Corona's west city limits.  The planning commission had recommended approval of the request, but information about the firm's plans did not publicly materialize during the planning session.  LEONARD H. HANDLEY, president of the firm, said the development schedule covers the balance of this year and all of next year. Ten parcels will be developed during that period, he indicated, and the firm already has lease commitments on some of them.  Pianms include a 22,000-square-foot multi-industrial purpose structure, a 50,000 foot warehouse-already in escrow, a mobile home sales lot and oth^ industrial uses.  Handley said the firm may sell some of the parcels, but it prefers to retain possession of its own property, apparently on a lease basis.  THE PROPOSAL presented two major problems to the council-water supply and sewage disposal. The firm ' wanted the city to ej^tend a water main to the site, and asked approval of the use of septic tanks for sewage disposal.  Handley said water mains would have to be extended 1,100 feet, and Üiat he and City Engineer Art Goulet had reached certain agreements, but neither of them went into details.  A WATER WELL is on the site, and Handley said his Arm would dedicate it u) the city in exchange for certain concessions. Apparently he wants the city to foot at least part of the bill for extending the water main. The council didn't question Handley or Goulet about details, indicating that members already have a portion of that information.  The council spent considerable time considering the proposed use of septic tanká. Corona now is under a cease and desist order from the Regiimal Water Quality Control Board, which has declared that the city is polluting the Santa Ana River downstream with effluent from its sewage disposal plant. THE BOARD has noted Corona is ^ ^^ ^ A making definite progress in solving its  I rnnQS to proUem, and has not moved to enforce ^^ ^^ ^ ■ the cease and desist order. The council  _ _ indicated concern that ise of septic  tanks at the Royal American project s Tu n U W might provoke immediate enforcement.  ^ g Goulet allayed the fears by assuring  r> . councilmen that the city would have no  WASHINGTON(AP)-ThePentagon jj^bility or responsibility because announced today that several hun^ gg^^ „ot pass  Amy ^ratrooi^rs and Marmes have through the disposal plant,  been ordered to Washmgton to stand by „ .. . T ,u ^„„i  in case of trouble during Saturday's «írí  presidential inauguration. «^'.th the state about the ^  Defense Department spokesman the s^tic t^ks' discharge. The f rm  Jerry W. Friedheim said the action was be subject to certoin city sto j  taken at the request of the Justice «"Ch as prohibiüon agamst  DMiartment regeneratmg water softeners.  Ttiwar protesters are expected here , »^J^»!^®^ ^SSUJEP the council  for demonstrations timed ^coincide that discharge from the tanks would not with the inauguration. Sponsors of the mdus rial waste,  rally say tens of thousands will par- , ""^er re atively recent state  ticioate legislation, cities may pre-zone land  FYiedheim said the troops wiU begin to-  arriving this aftenioon and tonight and ^his was done to ass^e be billSed on federal property in the Jevelo^rs that they would obtom ^e  Washington area. The riottrained troops "efore considerable  include Marines ffom Camp Lejeune, expenditures coraiected with annexaUon  N.C. and paratroopers and military po-  lice from Ft. Bragg, N.C. and Ft. Roy^ American's site js now in  Meade, Md. cetóify land, but falls within the  Friedheim said that the exact number ¡»-ovisions of state legislation for pre-  is not yet known but would probably zoning.  total about 2,000. ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ development of the  I n A y would be annexation to the city. This  InuGX probably would be relatively simple  Classified......................10.11 inasmuch as the land is uninJiabited and  Comics.......... ..................8 would be under one ownei^ip.  DearAbby.........................7  Editorial..........................4 .mm .§  Family Page.......................7 yVCOiner  Good Health.......................8  Horoscope..... ...........f......11 Variable clouds and 30 per cent  Markets...........................3 chance of rain tomorrow. Windy at  Memory Lane......................3 times.  Sidewalk Slants....................3 Today's noon temperature was 5»,  Sports.............................after an overnight low of 3». Yesterday's  Television.........................8 high was 61.  States and North Vietnam, press secretary Ronald L. Ziegler said:  "Dr. Henry Kissinger will resume private negotiations with special adviser Le Due Tho and Minister Xuan Thuy on Jan. 23, 1973 for the purpose of completing the text of an agreement."  Ziegler indicated Kissinger would leave Washington Monday for Paris and said he could not predict how long the «ivoy might remain.  Asked if this would be the final meeting of Kissinger and Tlio, Ziegler said, "the announcement will have to speak for itself."  YOUNGEST ONE—The only kindergartner to go through the Garreteon School bike rodeo today was Karen Urban on a tiny bicycle. Here she is at the last station of the event, which featured nine riding exercises. Her bike is inspected for safety features by Frank Kraatz, owner of the Corona Bike Shop, who volunteered to do the inspections. There were about <100 children who went through the riding portion of the event after about 500 took a written test. Each participant was given a certificate.  Explosion rips UFW complex  DELANO, Calif. (AP) — Investigatoi^ were digging through rubble today after a bomb blast damaged a building at the United Farm Workers complex here, the Kern County Sheriff's Office said.  Capt. A1 Loustalot said ttw Wednesday night explosion rocked cars in the street and broke windows in nearby houses.  Richard Chavez, brother of UFW leader Cesar Chavez, said the blast ripped open an 18-inch thick steel-reinforced wall of the UFW Ckwp Service Station that had closed about 20 minutes before the explosion.  Chavez said the explosion also damaged the roof and broke several windows.  He said the UFW headquarters building 150 yards away was slightly damaged as was a farm house adjacent to the complex.  Chavez said two cars parlTed next to the service station building were desU"oyed.  Loustalot said it was too early to determine the exact nature of the device used. But added that it was definitely "an explosive device."  He said a sheriff's deputy on patrol nearby heard the blast and observed a tdack sports car leaving the scene.  Chavez said there were several persons in nearby buildings but no one was injured.  CAB rules nixed for Nixon kin  WASHINGTON (AP) - The Civil Aeronautics Board waived its rules this week to enable Braniff International to operate a round-trip jet charter flight between Los Angeles and Washington for relatives of President and Mrs. Nixon attending the inauguration ceremonies.  Braniff is operating the service for a nonexistent organization, "the families of the first family."  The airline assured the CAB, however, that all the passengers to be ' transported would be persons of bloodor marriage relationship to the Ryan and Nixon families. Mrs. Nixon is the former Patricia Ryan.  Thus, Braniff said, they would have a bond of affinity of more than six months standing, in accordanciB with civil air regulations, and this affinity or membership would be unrelated to the purchase and use of air transportation.  Persons who join a club-type charter organization.merely to obtain cheap air travel, and not for affinity reasons, are not considered by the CAB to qualify for charter flight participation;  A letter from CAB Secretary Harry Zink to Braniff's legal representatives here, granting the waiver because of special and unusual circumstances, was made public today.  However, the flight from Los^^ Angeles was operated Wednesday, Braniff said. The return flight is scheduled for Jan. 21.  A Braniff spokesman said he did. not know how many Nixon and Ryan family members were aboard the 165-passenger Boeing 707. In accordance with CAB regulations, this information will be provided for CAB files.  TTie 120,867.76 charter contract was executed with the Inaugural Committee 1973. Braniff said it was approached for the service only a, few days befoire the contract was submitted, hence the need for quickspccial approval by the CAB.  The Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms division of the U.S. Treasury Depart-. ment said they have entered the case.  WORLD  at a glance  teary flown to LA  LONDON (AP) - Dr. Timothy Leary, former Harvard professor and drug advocate, was flown to Los Angeles today with a two-man escort fr<»n the U.S. Narcotics Bureau.  Leary escaped in September 1970 frwn prison in San Luis Obispo County, Calif., where he was serving a 10-year sentence on a drug conviction. He was expelled from Afghanistan Wednesday.  400 bombing strikes  SAlGON (AP) - U.S. warplanes flew more than 400 strikes across South Vietnam Wednesday and today, the U.S. Command announced. It was ^e second day of heavy air attack and the largest number of strikes in the South in more than two months.  LJ.S. war casualties  SAIGON (AP) - The U.S. command reported today that two Americans were killed in action in Indochina last week, 11 were wounded and six are missing or captured. Two other Americans died from nonhostile causes, the command reported.  Lavish Thieu fete  SAIGON (AP) - President Nguyen Van Thieu has scheduled a lavish reception at Independence Palace Friday to follow the marriage of his only daughter and Nguyen Tan Trieu, son (rf the director of Air Vietnam.  Thieu's daughter, Nguyen Thi Tuan Anh, and Trieu arie to be married in Saigon's Catholic cath^al, with a mass to bd^elebrated by Archbishop Nguyen Van Binh.  Sfate buifi  900,000 mi  of$1  SACRAMENTO auKh is I9.3 bilUo Ronald Rei  rngt^f  itystreicldBf M  itreceb «eiic^ aiorf^tbi« Ulf^  mtrnee earth.  tb*  'J  ÜMMl». IMIlMihUi«  à&iSiriSi,  IH im vpmiMNÎÎ .'«pli IT jrctiriA i  «•teMi^  H^ lonfMFi IUMIIIm   

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