Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Corona Norco Independent Newspaper Archive: January 10, 1973 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Corona Norco Independent

Location: Corona, California

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Corona Norco Independent (Newspaper) - January 10, 1973, Corona, California                                 85th Year, No. 150  Wednesday, January 10> 1973  Phone 737 1234  22 Pages—10 Cents  tk  City error snags apartment project  Planners OK large tract here  . o  A 601-lot tentative tract map won the approval of Corona planhing ' commissioners last night, and now is headed for the city council for final approval.  The map was one of several items on an agenda that kept commissioners at their desk until 12:45 a.m. and was the largest construction project before them. The agenda listed Harold M. Stem as the laijd owner, and Larwin Southern California, Inc. as the developer. . THE PROJECT, brginally filed as a 575-lot development, will be situated in northwest Corona in a newly annexed area bounded by Lincolnr on the east and River on the north.  Despite the city council's anti-wall policy, the planners approved walls on River and Lincoln, both major or secondary streets.  The increase in the number of lots was caused by the division of a parcel planned as a school site. The developer will develop that acreage in two years if the school district fails to purchase it.  IN ANOTHER significant action, the planners approved a Corona Construction, Inc. map showing 55 lots on 25 acres south of Ontario and west of Lincoln, The planners were told that the developer will build single family homes on 14,400-foot lots, with the valuation of each ranging from $40,000 to $50,000.  The planners set a public hearing for Feb. 23 for a change in the general plan requested by Creative Finance Corp. for further development of the Cresta Verde subdivision project. The developer wants 9,600-foot lots instead of the present open space and conservation zoning.  THE PLANNERS ALSO set a Feb. 23 public hearing on the proposed addition of a scenic highway element to the city's general plan.  They continuéd to Feb. 13 a proposed amendment to the city'.s site plan review ordinance.  In further action, the planners set a special study session for next Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m. to consider changes in the planned development zone.  They sent back to thé council a 26-lot tentative tract map submitted by former Mayor Bill Smith after solving minor problems raised by the council last week. Smith proposes a subdivision on 26.7 acres south of Chase, north of . Pacific and east of Garretson.  An unusual feature of Smith's project is the commission's and council's approval of the use of septic tajiks for sewage disposal. A staff proposal for a dry sewer system was scrappe^fK^ the planners and approved by the council.  Terrell to be in capital tomorrow  Schools Supt. Charles Terrell will l^avel to Sacramento tomorrow for a meeting with Senator Craig Biddle and State Allocations Board Executive Officer Don Anderson to discuss the possibility of using bond môney to air-condition schools already built in the district. ^  Inform'ation will be discussed as to whether special legislation must be obtained to do this.  Terrell is also planning to attend the state board of education meeting tomorrow at which adoption of the kindergarten through eighth grade health textbooks will be considered along with a progress report on editing of the science books which have required editing following the creation theory controversy.  Hunt pleads guUt  WASHINGTON (AP) - E. Howard Hunt Jr., a former White House aide who is one of the seven defendants in the Watergate bugging trial, pleaded guilty today to three counts of the charges against him.  The prosecutor told the judge the plea was acceptable to his office.  The charges .to which Hunt pleaded guilty are one of conspiracy to intercept telephone conversations at , the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee; another to intercept oral communications through a microphone placed in the headquarters  Further details are in Page 11.  WORLD  at o glance  But proposal finally wins  U.S. jet shot down USG permît  SAIGON AP - The U.S. Command announced today the loss of another fighter-bomber over North Vietnam and a helicopter in South Vietnam just below the demilitarized zone. It said all eight Americanis aboard the two aircraft were missing.  This raised to 35 the number of U.S. aircraft tJie Command has reported lost in Indochina since Dec. 18, when the two-week aerial blitz on Hanoi and Haiphong was launched. The U.S. Command in daily communiques has rieported a total of 107 Americans killed, captured or missing in these crashes, the costliest air losses of the war.  McCloskey to Hanoi?  WASHINGTON AP - Rep. Paul N. McCloskey, R-Calif., is attempting to arrange a trip to Hanoi for four U.S. congressmen to see for themselves how much damage American bombing has done to the North Vietnamese capital.  Union reacts to freeze  LONDON AP - Major British airports and government offices were brought to a stand-still today by thousands of government employes who staged the first big union revolt against Prime Minister Edward Heath's wage freeze.  USSR said aiding Syria  WASHINGTON AP - The Soviet Union delivered 18 MIG jet fighters to Syria only weeks before the outbreak of the new Syrian-Israeli air battles, U.S. intelligence sources report.  Queen to visit Canada  LONDON AP - Queen Elizabeth II and her husband. Prince Philip, leave for an n-day visit to Canada on June 25, Buckingham Palace announced today.  Israeli leader to Paris  JERUSALEM AP - Prime Minister Golda Meir said today she will attend a gathering of Socialist leaders in Paris despite the charge of President Georges Pompidou that it amounted to intervention in France's internal affairs.  Sentencing set  MONTREAL AP - Giles Eccles, the last of three inen convicted of arson in a dance hall fire that killed 37 persons Sept. 1, will be sentenced Jan. 19. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter Tuesday after the charge was reduced from murder.  Third session held  PARIS AP - Henry A. Kissinger and Le Due Tho met for four hours today in the third session of their new Vietnam peace talks.  Nixon's European trip plan delayed  WASIHINGTON (AP) - President Nixon's hopes to make a postinaugural trip to Western Europe have been set aside pending the outcome of Vietnam peace negotiations, White House sources say.  To demonstrate official desires fw continued close ties with the western Europeans—and to underscore administration efforts to revamp the international monetary system— Nixon at one point had been expected to make such a trip as early as February.  Cities most often mentioned as likely stopping points were Paris, Bonn, Rome, Brussels, and London.  Kirkpatrick quits shepherd  WASHINGTON MP) — ITie White House announced today Miles W. Kirkpatrick, who was installed as President Nixon's "new broom" chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, is leaving government for the private practice of law.  Literal truth OK  WASfllNGTON (AP) - Thé Supreme Court today ruled that perjury charges do not ap^y to anyone who tells the literal truth, even if the implication is misleading or false. o  is awaiting owner  A German shepherd which was struck by a car on Hamner Avenue last night is waiting to be claimed at the Terry Hospital for Smali Animals in Norco.  Deputy Peter Curzon took the dog to Dr. DeVon Terry shortly after the 7:30 p.m. aCwdent between Third and Fourth streets.  Dr. Terry said the black and tan male is about three or four years old and had a chain around its neck. He said it suffered bad cuts.  By henry leppard  A two-building 84-unit apartment project on River Road ran into problems last night before Corona planning commissioners could take a word of testimony.  During the subsequent hour-and-l5-minutfe hearing, the planners reached a solution~at least to the satisfaction of themselves and the applicant-and granted a conditional use permit. City council approval is not mandatory, but under a new city ordinance the council may call the commission's action up for review.  Appearing to support the project, on the north side of River near Cota, were developers Citation Development Co., Inc. and Dr. David Dixon.  before the applicants or planners could say a word. Principal Planning and Building Official Arnbid Peterson said, "The planning staff erred in this application. We were ignorant of the city's policy of excluding direct access to River."  Development rnaps showed the buildings in the center of a rectangular parcel, short side adjacent to River, and a circular drive for two lanes of traffic around the buildings. Curb breaks on each side of the structures provided direct access afid exit directly from and to River.  Apparently the engineering staff raised the objections. Principal Engineer Ed James said the zoning code prohibits an exit within 600 feet of an intersection. The map showed the east curb break 200 to 300 feet from Cota.  "STAFF erred in not furnishing the applicant proper guidelinesr^' said. Peterson. "The oversight will compel the applicant to redesign the entire project and cause him considerable delay."  Although staff failure caused the problem, Peterson said, "I don't think that errors of staff can transcend the city code." ''  Peterson later conceded that the code says access and exit "should not be ■^rmitted" on rtiajor and secondary streets, instead of "shall not be permitted," but that didn't solve the distance problem from an intCTsection, which is covered by city code.  James argued that River ,is a 60 mile per hour high speed road, and access to it would be hazardous. The commission conceded that the east exit., could be a traffic problem.  They solved the problem by ruling that the developer must install a mechanical protective device to keep cars from exiting on the east side of the buildings. They ruled that cars may enter there, but must drive ardlind the buildings to the wdst curb break for exit. •  dixon argued that during the many conferences with staff, nothing was said about the distance problem. "Everyone praised the plan as one of the best reaching City Hall in a long time," he said. "Then at the last minute staff comes up with this problem."  Because of a new city ordinance, all multiple family projects require a conditional use permit.  Chance for rain tonight  Forecasters say there is a better than 30 per cent chance of more rain here by tomorrow and it could start by tonight.  The storm could drop a half-inch of rain atop the quarter-inch just received.  Little temperature change is expected for tomorrow.  Today's noon temperature was 59, after an overnight low of 40. Yesterday's high was 58.  WATER BOTTLE CONFERENCE—Jim E. Grissom, 40, a new Corona city employe, rinds the water bottle a convenient spot for a conference with Kathy D. Havens; who has been with the Corona Finance Dept. for about six months. Grissom went to work yesterday as the department's principal accountant. He has been in municipal finance for 15 years, and came to Corona from Cypress where he served for six years as finance director. City Manager Jim Wheaton says Grissom is "over qualified" for the position here, and probably won't stay with lie city. In fact, he has an understanding with the city that he's looking for a finance director's position, and will resign here when he fhids one. But Wlieaton and Director John Grindrod are hoping to keep Grissom around for at least a year.  Red Taylor's I-J 5 mission  Norco mayor says the shoe is on other foot this time  "The shoe's on the other foot now," commented Norco Mayor Bill Jarrett on Councilman O.M. (Red) Taylor's projected trip ^ijx) Sacramento next month.  Jarrett was referring to Taylor's stated intention of going north to the State Highway Commission session when Interstate 15 is expected to be on the agenda. Taylor said the council minority should be heard as well as the majority.  Captain charges 'stupidity and laxity' in bombing raids  WASHINGTON (AP) - An Air Force captain who participated in recent B52 bombing, missions over Hanoi has charged the Strategic Air Command with "stupidity and laxity" in planning the raids.  "Either by stupidity or sheer laziness, my crew bombed the same target on thë first and third nights of the raids," using the same routes covered by enemy missiles, he said in a letter to Sen. Charles McC. Mathias Jr., R-Md., his homestate senator.  Mathias forwarded the letter to Sen. John C. Stennis, D-Miss., chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, noting that it describes "a disturbing situation in which unnecessary risks were taken." Mathias asked for a further investigation if the actions did occur.  Mathias' office deleted the names of the captain, who was the plane's navigator, and a sergeant who also signed it.  The captain said in his letter that he was not writing to oppose prolongation of the war, "although I certainly oppose a continuation of the war," but to give "my impressions of the raids, and to apprise you of some of the situations that we have encountered on those raids."  He charged SAC with improper planning, declaring that, which it may be justified to bomb the same target twice "there is absolutely no excuse to make the bomb runs on the very same heading, with the very same exit route—  Riots brîng concern  BELFAST,AP -An increase in rioting in Northern Ireland is tailing concern to security forces.  when it was known that new SAM (sur-face-to-air) missiles sites had been erected along that exit route."  Birds are bombed on the berries  ST. PETERSBURG, Fla (AP) — The swallows return to Capistrano March 19, the buzzards fly to Hinckley, Ohio, March 15 and the robins head for St. Petersburg when the berry bushes ferment.  They—are llocklii& to this Florida west coast city to nip the juicy scarlet berries of the holly bush. *„  The warm January sun ferments the ripe berries.  The robins gorge themselves, then fly blind. Wobbling on branches, staggering, doing ground loop^.  Audubon Society leader Mrs. H. R. Mills say the redbreasted bir^s first appeared last year and seem to have added St. Petersburg to their migratory nigh^ plan.  Mrs. Mills says the birds will begin working their way north in about a month or so.  The first stop: nearby Plant City's strawberry fields.  Jarrett recalled that when mass efforts to convince the state to route 1-15 along route 31 and 71 from Elsinore to Fontana were on, he was on the council minority against the plan.  Then-Mayor Ivan Warrick went to speak for it and Jarrett, when he asked to go for the minority, was told no.  Taylor said he will go at his own expense, since the, council denied his request. y  Schools eye Navy  building  By DONNA TICE The local school distrjtt may get one of the 10 buildings at the Navy's Fleet Missile Systems facility in Norco. The building is being declared surplus by the federal government.  Schools Supt. Charles Terrell, County Supt. Don Keniîy and Asst. County Supt. Brooks Coleman toured the building yesterday. The building is No. 301, currently occupied by FMSAEG, and has 62,000 square feet, enough room for 24 classrooms.  FMSAEG is planning to move from the 10 buildings nearest the Fifth Street gate further back into the complex which Naval Weapons Center vacated some time ago, leaving the other buildings vacant. ,  TERRELL is hoping to house Kimbell High School there, as Kimbell is now located in two buildings at the administration center and needs more space.  The county is also considering having the county Regional Occupational Program headquartered at the facility, where there are good places for wood, metal and auto shops, painting areas and electrical shops. The local district-along with Alvord, Jurupa, Moreno Valley and Riverside districts-is involved in the ROP projfcct. ^  Terrell is writing letters to the Department of the Navy at San Bruno, Department of Defense and congressmen and senators. He stated he had been told unofficially that the possibility exists of having the building as early as next October.  HE ALSO said that hé is seeking 50 of the 3350 acres of land involved in the surplus declaration. But there is competition for the land, life said. He wants the land as sites for an elementary school and a high school because there is a possibility of land developers' using the land as residential.  V Terrell: also voiced the possibility of having ah ROP food services program there to work in the Norconian Club, where employes currently prepare meals for FMSAEG employes. '  Struggles in Corona store wreak havoc  A 17-year-old Corona youth todiy faces a variety of charges stemming from an alleged petty theft and a battle with police and persons in a drug store.  The youth was booked for petty theft, two counts of battery and malicious mischief as the result of citizen's arrest. As an outgrowth of the battle, officers booked him for public intoxication, disturbing the peace (obcenity) and resisting arrest.  Officers rolled to the scene in response to a call thai two males were attempting to subdue another male at Thrifty Driig Store, 380 N. Main. They found two men holding the suspect face down on the floor.  Police identified the men as Johnny R. Murray, 28, a store employe, and Michael S. Emett, 24 of Riverside.  Murray told the officers that he caught the suspect taking a six-pack of beer, and challenged him outside the store. The suspect reportedly thi'ew the beer to the pavement, pushed Murry aside, and a wrestling match followed with Emett coming to Murray's aid. The pair subdued the youth and took him inside the store where another battle started. They had wrestled him to the floor when police arrived.  Police had attached handcuffs to one wrist when the youth again became violent. Another battle followed before officers could secure the second wrist and pack the youth to a patrol unit.  Officers said that during the struggles in the store, in the main aisle, two table were kicked over, a display of guitars knocked down and a window smashed in a tobacco case.  2 Norco women's purges are stolen  Two Norco women have reported to sheriff's deputies the theft of their purses trum^. their car Monday. They contained a total of $120.  Both purses were left in the unlocked car parked at the rear of the residence at 975 Third St., Norco. The owners are Jennie and Beverly Jean Ferrari.  Index  Classified ... Cuniic!;,... Dear Abbv .. Kditoi ii^ .. ., Family l*af>(* (¡«nkI ih'iiUh ilorosc(>|)«' .. !>lark« ls ... .. IVIt'iuory Lane Sidt'walk Si;iii  .12 ... 10  ... 1« ...17 ... l.->  . . . IS  Ti:l  .-........   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication