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Corona Daily Independent Newspaper Archive: October 30, 1967 - Page 1

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Publication: Corona Daily Independent

Location: Corona, California

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   Corona Daily Independent (Newspaper) - October 30, 1967, Corona, California                                 SUN AND SMOKE — Billowirfg blade smolce from the Riverside and Orange counties' brush tPiday::)^^^ des+royftd nearly,  40,000 acres of vegetation, almost blacked out the sun at the south end of Paseo Grande yesterday afternoon as shown in the picture  on the left. There were 60 hors^es, a steer and five sheep in danger at the Shaffer Stables at 180.0. Passp Gwode!, :;All vere saved, many.by; young people like" Linda Sorceic shown with a gray she rode out of the Wardlow Wash. In the picture on the right the first of four air  craft dropping boron on the fire is shown. The drop was in an effort to save the Sky Rarich..ihr.eatentd. at. thi Jim,®. . —Staff photos on this page and page 3 by Henry Leppard, Bette Reincke and Jerry Daven. port  iiiiniiniiiiiiiiiniiiifiimniiimniiiiinfiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirtiiiiiiiiiininimiiinini>iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiniiiiiim  VOL 54  lb CENTS  PHONE 737-1234  iuiií¡iiÍHÍíiíi¡iiiiniuíiiHiím¡üiüÍHM  Serving western Riverside County  CORONA. CALIFORNIA " "" , MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 19675:  ÌMÌÌÌÌÌHÌÌMÌÌÌÌHÌÌÌÌÌHMÌÌÌÌÌÌMÌ  Brush fire still  rages  FIRE AT NIGHT — Was a spectacular sight last night as it moved over the Siinta Ana Mountains from Wardlow Wash into Orange County.  Viet Cong company wiped out by heavy weapons  By GEORGE ESPER  SAIGON, m — U.S. infantrymen surprised a Viet Cong •company near the Cambodian border todav and it was all but  wiped out by artillery, napalm and aerial bombs, a military spokesman reported.  A spokesman for the 1st Infantry Division said it was be-  O.J. may be through  LOS ANGELES (ffi —' South-em California halfback O.J. Simpson, the nation's leading collegiate rusher, was declared out of action indefinitely Monday, perhaps for thè season.  The fleet back sprained the arch in his right foot Saturday» when the Trojans beat Oregon 28 - 6 to remain undefeated. Loss of Simpson for any length of time would be a blow to the No. 1 ranked Trojans who  have California, Oregon State and UCLA remaining.  Simpson said, "The doctors told me majSbe two weeks."  Coach John McKay declared there was no way to tell when the halfback could return and said, "0. J. is the one who got us where we are. Now we've got to do it on our own. I doubt if he will play much more football for us—if any— this season. He is on crutches now."  Reagan would stop 'aid, -comfort' demonstrations  SACRAMENTO W — Gov. R©a,gan has suggested possible federal legislation to deal with antidraft, antiwar demonstrations which — Reagan said — give "comfort and aid to the enemy."  The laws should leave roam for reasonable dissent, Reagan said, but not anything that attempts to justify "bloodshed, arsor, violence, damages to property and harm to individuals."  The gorvemor made the com-  Weafher  Sunny Tuesday. Strong gusty northeast winds below canyons. Warmer widi highs Tuesday 8S to 95. Lows tonight 40 to 55.  , Today's noon temperature was 82, after an overnight low of 56. Yeste^ay's maximuiji was'81.  ments after returning to Sacramento Saturday from a three - day six • dty speaking tour. Most of the stops were for Repulilican party fund raising events.  Such demonstrators would be covered by a number of laws if the Uixited States technically was at war Reagan noted.  Reagan said he is not ad-vocatii\g a declaration of war, .but noted, "We're in combat with an enemy. Today, demonstrations suQh as the one in Oakland are actually giving comfort and" aid to the enemy."  Reagan handles more GOP "party chores" this week and will make a brief trip into Northern Mexico.  He'lL be in Mexicali on Thursday for a meeting of the Commission of the Californias and then go to San Diego Friday to address a San Diego County Republican dinner. He'll also speak to an Imperial Cowty ReipuWican .gathet'-ing in El Centro Satui'day.  lived 80 enemy troops were killed in the battle about 72 miles northwest'of Saigon near where a furious 14-hour battle raged Sunday. U.S. ■ losses-were put at three dead and three wounded.  In the air war, U.S. fighter-bombers carried their furious campaign against the heartland of North Vietnam through its sixth straight day Sunday, battering targets near the chief port of Haiphong.  Racing against the approaching monsoons. Navy pilots hammered the Cat Bi MIG air base, the Chi Lai transshipment point, and a barge repair yard that was hit for the first time. All were within seven miles of the center of Haiphong.  A spokesman said the weather was beginning to close in over North Vietnam, which will provide a protective blanket, but">iavy pilots were able: to mount strikes along the coast.  North Vietnam claimed three U.S. planes were shot down, but the U.S. Command made no report of any losses. Since the heavy raids on the Hanoi-Haiphong area began last Tuesiday, the U.S. Command has announced the loss of 15 planes and 16 fliers.  There was also no confirmation of a Hanoi claim that a BS2 strategic; bomber was shot down just north of the demilitarized; zone Sunday........  In the 28 months the big high - altitude bombers .have  been attacking in Vietnam, none has been shot down but four have collideiJ in the air over the sea and crashed and another crashed at Da ,Nang •while making emergency landing with two of its eight engines out.  By BETTE REINCKE  Gale blowJ flames leaped the crest of the Santa Ana Mountains above Coronita late yesterday and by noon today, fire had blackened more than an estimated 30,000 acres in the two county area and destroyed''more than 100 structures.  Sparks driven by the hot dry wind created small fires which quickly joined together, outracing firefighters from local and state-wide sources and, this morning, forced closing Highway 91 near Green River Golf Course.  About 50 homes in the $40,-000 elaS« were reported consumed by fire on the western side of the moimtain range in Orange County this morning. Eyeing weather forecasts of , continuing high winds and low , humidity, fire co-6rdinatbrs were reluctant to predict containment in either county, ¿onditions "could get worse — much worse," officials said.  All California Divisions of Forestry units in this county were being co-ordinated by the Norco headquarters of the CDF .while United States Forestry service units were operating from the Shaffer Ranch at the end of Paseo Grande south of Coronita, .  , tHc! Corona Fire D^rtment. sent one civil defense unit to the fire, which reportedly start  ed just south of Mountain View Couiitry Club from unknown causes. Another Corona unit remained on standby at the end of Paseo Grande. The dvil defense unit later went to Orange County after the fire topped the mountains.  Traffic problems, always bad on Sunday, were complicated by traffic from the Riverside Raceway Grand Prix yesterday and the fire, spectacular .with wind-blown flames and towering clouds of smoke, slowed vdiicles to a near halt as all gai>ed at the display.  Highway 71 north of 91 was clogged with parked cars as more drivers pulled over to watch the awe-inspiring sight.  Sheriff's deputies said today all spectators were forbidden to us© any of tfis ^ree»s and roads where fii-e-fighting equipment must go. Two spectators were arrested last night, they said«  Telephone circuits from Corona to Orange County were knocked out but crews ar« presently working to restore them although fire still is threatening the area, said Joe Canzoneri, local Pacific Telephone office manager. Calls are presently being re-routed automatically but service is necessarily slower, due to fewer available cirdiits.'he" said.;  The 25 man crew is using a water truck and hose to keep  1927 classmen sought for homecoming fete  by Tim Monich  Members of Corona Senior High's Class of 1927 are being sought for CHS's 1967 Homecoming.  The theme of Homecoming activities, submitted in a school • wide contest by the senior class, is "1927." In accordance with the theme, the Class of 1927 will be special guests at the alumni reception following thé Novemiber 10 homecoming, game. Any member of the class or any  Monday, the sixth, with a car smash ^^nsored by the Coro-nettei. Students can purchase a swing - of - a - sledgehammer for a quarteif and can keep amy part they break off from the old car.  Monday evening the Key Club is holding an Old Time Film Festival featuring Charlie Chaplin, W. C. Fields, Laurel and Hardy, Fractured Flickers, and, live and in person the Cigar Band, a musical T comic band which has  pSrstíh -kriowíog thè wh^^^^ - play®d at -Disneyland ; -this abouts of such a person should summer.  call the school during this week so that invitations can be mailed out for the reception.  Chairman of Homecoming Activities, Terry Holmies, says the activities this year will be better than preceding years due to a, good, solid theme built around the Roaring 20s.  The week's events will begin  The Lettermen's Club is sponsoring a slave day to be held Friday. Lettermen will be sold to girls w(ho need a slave for a day on Tuesday, Wednesday, and "Iliursday of the week.  The German Club plans to hold a Beer Drinking Contest during both lunch periods  Tues(&y. Parents need not fiaar the intoxication of their dhijldren. The club is serving Apple Beer, Ginger Beer, and Near Beer,  Wednesday Rooters Club is oi^ganizing a Dress-Up Day, in which studenjs will dress up in the fashions and fads of the 20's. In conjunction with this - event, the Rooters Club will also hold a dance and a Charleston contest at each lunch period.  The Girls' League is having a raifly" seventh-{>eriod ia the football stadium Thursday featuring a pie - eating contest between the teachers, a tricycle race between the class presidents and vice - presidents, and an old - tashioned bathing suit ^contest. There will be awards for the funniest suit, the most atrocious suit, and a Mister and Miss  Student draws 25,000 to a patriotic rally  WAkEFIELD, Mass. m — A 19-year-old high school stu-' dent who organized a patriotic rally that drew a polipe esti- _ mated 25,000 persons to the town common says he hopes it will touch off nationwide public demonstrations in support of American servicemen.  hope this will spark a tidal wave of enthusiasm .a-cross the nation," Paul P. Christopher Jr. said Sunday after serving as master of ceremonies for a 75-minute program of prayers and speeches.  Flag-wavirig youths, including grammar school- young--  sters and-members of thre« »'  motorcycle gangs, interrupted €he speakers with boisterous cheers and chanting of patriotic slogans.  Although Police Chief J. Merrit Wenzel's estimate of a 25,00r turnout was about one- " fourth what Christopher had said he hoped for, Uie Wakefield High School senior termed the rally "a complete success" when he met with newsmen.  He said the rally was held as a -gesture of - support for Am- ~ erican servicemen in Vietnam and not to take sides on "whether or not we should be ift in Vietnam."  Christopher said he decided to organize toe demonstration after becoming "burned up" at an -anti-Vietnam protest in downtown Boston Oct. 16 when abolit 200 youths either buined what they claimed were their draft cards oi^tuiTied the documents over to clergymen.  Wakefield, a town of about  25,000 residents. Is located a-bout eight miles north-Of ton.  Gov. John A. Voipe told th« crowds at Christopher's rally, "Patriotism is said by some people to be old-fashioned now. But it never should be out of fashion. It can stand revival. Let's make it fashionable together,"  Christopher dropped out of high school to run a sandwich shop he still operates, but later returned to school and say« he plans to enlist in the Army after graduation.  Bathing Suit. Atlantic City has never seen the like.  Friday is Homecoming Day. It will start off with an entertainment assembly during second period put on by the pep squad. The big event of the show appears to be the "Swan LaJce" ballet, as performed by the varsity football team, starring Sid Riches as prima iballerina. A Homecoming Parade will begin at 6:00 p.m. at Main and Grand Blvd. hear Corona Junior High, proceeding west on Grand Blvd. to Sixth Street, down Sixth, up Lincoln Avenue, culminating at the Corona Semor High football stadium. The homecoming game will begin at 8:15, with Corona's Panthers plaiying John North's Huskies.  A highlight of the game, and of the entire school year, will be the crowning of the Homecoming Queen. Each club on campus siponsors a deserving senior girl for the honor and the entire student body will vote Tuesday, November 7, for a queen and four runners-up.  _______Following the game Friday.  the Executive Council is holding an Alumni Reception far CHS alumni, with the Class of 1927 as special guests.  The week's activities will come to an end Satiu-day night with the 'Lettermen's Club-sponsored ball, at which the Homeoominc Queen will reign. Providinig the music fc»^ the ball wiU be the Sandal^, who recorded the soundtrack for the immensely popular surfing film, "The Endless Summer."  back /lames as they work, Canzoneri said.  Two crews of young men the Los Pinos Job Corps camp near Elsinore were called out last night to assist the U.S. Forest Service in attempts to control the blaze here.  Officials here and in Orange county, all of whom refused to allow their names to be used, said only one of several fire lookout stations in the Santa Ana Mountains in this area is still operating.  Othei;s were closed down in early July this year in a state-wide economy move, they said. The remaining station is 01^ Santiago Peak south and a litjle ejist of Corona.  More than ' 80 fire^fighting units including about 200 men froni thè CaHfomia Division of Forestry and the California Disaster Office have been ordered to the fire scene by Gov. Ronald Reagan although it has not been declared a disaster area. /■ Also placed on alert were National Guard and U.S. Marine Corps units at Camp Pendleton in San Diego Countj».  In Norco, the entire garage of the CDiF» station has been turned into a large kitchen where ' men are cooking hot meals and coffee for fire ■ creWs. Some àre being sefVed : on fire lines and others come to Norco as they are relieved. Crews from Prado and Don Lugo Conservation Camps had been on fire lines along with three bulldozers and other forestry imits for more than 14 hours as of this morning.  Five air tankers, four piun-pers, three bulldozers and six conservation crews were working out of the Norco CDF station today though one 'dozer was reported broken down this morning.  Lee Sherman, assisting the co-ordinating at the Norco station today said he could make no predictions on containment of any part of the now^ widely separated blazes., The vast blaze was bounded at noon by Highway 91 on the north although it had jumped across in three widely separated areas, and on the west by the Newport Freeway. Both freeways were closed as wer« many other streets and roads in both counties.  Aerial tankers reported difficulty in fire retardant chemical drops because of the spreading columns of smoke.  Index  Comics .............•  Crossword.........;........8  Dr. Möhler ................ •  Dear Abby ................ S  Editorial .................. 5  Horoscope ..................T  Markets ....................S  s K  Memory Lane ..............I  Society .................... 4  Sports......................t.  TV ........................ «  XhCAtCTS ••jLi^   

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