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Berkeley Gazette: Thursday, October 3, 1895 - Page 1

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   Berkeley Gazette (Newspaper) - October 3, 1895, Berkeley, California                                BUSINESS i OFFICE ____West Berkeley With____ Paine & Dickieson,^- 805 University Avenue. BUSINESS I OFFICE ....East Bbbkkjit With.... W.U. Telegraph Office^-- > Stanford Avenue. TOWN"  OFFICIAL VOLUME II. BERKELEY, CAL., THURSDAY OCTOBER 3, 1895. NUMBER 144 HANSCO/VTS ESTIMATE THE NEW U   C. FOOTBALL TEAM IN GOOD TRIM. Reception to Rev. Mr   Pierce at West Berkeley-Wheels at the Opera. Clerk Kanscom's Estimate. The Town Clerk has completed the computations and made the footings of the town tax rolls for the current year and has turned them over to the Tax Collector. The total assessed value of property in the town is $8,006,431, which is less than that of last year by $373,194. The value of acreage property is $1,050,860, a decrease of $212,-322. The Improvements on acreage property are valued at $231,742, an increase of $i 7,579. Lots are assessed at $4,242,234, a decreese of $1676; improvements thereon at $2,205,385,3 decrease of $177,385. Personal prop erty is valued at $276,210, just $640 greater than last year. The total tax is this year $67,087 70, against $55,-902 08. Of this amount $18,148 14 will he paid hy West Berkeley, $31,-214 01 by East Berkeley, $14,276 68 by South Berkeley annex, and $3448 87 by the Lorin annex, but this latter part of the town pays a school bond tax to the county not paid by the rest of Berkeley. Football. . Wheels at the Opera. The first bicycte\heatrical night in Oakland could hardly be called a sue cess. There was much of the restraint upon it that attended the first bloomer ball of the season. There was something over a dozen bloomered females in the house and probably a hundred knickerbockered gentlemen. Vast throngs of people gathered on the street to see the bifurcated brigade go bv, but the curions halted on the threshold of the theatre. The Reliance bikers attended in a body, but the Acme boys deserted the ranks at the last moment.        , It was evident that the bag attired maidens did not heartily enjoy themselves. Many of them wished when it was too late that they had worn the garments of the old woman instead of the new. This feeling soon passed off however, and the bloomerites settled down to enjoy the performance. Miss Hall thanked the brigade for its compliment to her cycling fad, and said she liked Oakland veiy much indeed. - After the show last night Miss Hall intended to take a moonlight ride on the wheel with the theater party, but this part of the programme was not carried out. A Public Officer Sued. VERY   POOR   TASTE. The University football players lined up lor the first time yesterday afternoon. In addition to the two elevens there were seventeen men left over, which may be taken as an indication of the prevailing enthusiasm. The work was under the'direction of Mr. Buttgrworth assisted by Captain Sherman. The bleachers were covered with students, who took a keen interest in the proceedings. About all the University was around to help open up the season in good'shape. Necessarily the work was rough, but the men are active, and the general impression is that the material is quite promising. The elevens began work about 4 o'clock and kept it up until dark. The continual work ing over to which the ground has been subjected during the past few weeks has brought it into very fair condition. ---. Pastors' Reception. The West Berkeley Methodist church wis filled last evening with members of the Epworth League and their friends to give a reception to the new pastor, Rev. Mr. Pierce, and his family. The evening's entertainment was opened with a song by the League. This was followed by an address of Welcome by the President of the League, Thomas Turner. Miss Genevieve Grindley then rendered a vocal solo, which was followed by a reading by Miss Gertie Turner. Miss Maud Wilkes then rendered a vocal solo and was followed with a recitation by Mr. Turner. The Misses Maud and Genevieve Grindley then  favored the audience with an entrancing duet and were fol lowed by Miss Kathleen Bcown in a recitation. The last song of the evening was sung by Anna Dickieson, and its conclusion the pastor made an address thanking the League for the reception, and expressing the hope that as they became better acquainted, they might be the means of accomplishing much good. The balance of the evening was spent in social converse after which hot chocolate and dainty cakes were served. CITIZENS   OF  WEST  BERKELEY INSULTED BY WINDY WINN. Stopped a Horse Car to Have the Driver Thread  a Needle-Other News. About two years ago a merry-go-round struck West Berkeley, and about the same time counterfeit money appeared. Just about this time Connie Newell, who was cbnstable at that time received a picture and a description of the man wanted by the authorities. In looking around for his man, one Hayden, who was with the merry go-round caught his eye. and as he was a good counterpart of the picture and also fitttd the description, Connie Newell placed him under arrest and he was locked up for several days in the County Jail, but the officers telegraphing for his arrest came to the conclusion that they did not want him and he was released. He then commenced suit against Mr. Newell and his bondmen for $2000 and the same has been slumbering until the present. It will come up before a jury in the Superior Court tomorrow and Connie was busy todav getting his witnesses together. We opine that   Mr.  Hayden  had better have let the job out as there is | but little doubt but that the officer did his duty in arresting him, and Hayden will only be out his time and his law- j yers fees. I -----   *~   ----- I A Home Product An excellent report comes from the Chino sugar-beet factory, located in the southern part of the State. Since July 9th last, when the factory opened for work, there has been used daily from 800 to 1000 tons of beets. These yielded about 250,000 pounds of sugar every twenty-four hours. To furnish j the raw material employment was given to 300 farmers in the vicinity. As the crop yielded about twenty tons to the acre, and as $4 per ton was paid lor it the farmers feel joyous over the result. The total yield is about 700 carloads of twenty tons each. The plant cost over one million dollars. As the southern part of the State consumes the major portion of the crop, a large amouct of money will be saved transportation. One hundred girls from San Francisco have arrived in Fresno to work packing raisins. in Attention Everybody. Messrs. Ramos & Renas, the most extensive dealers in hay, coal, wood and feed on this side of the Bay, have , just received a barge load of the finest hay that has ever been landed in Berkeley. They have also just received a schooner load of wood. As this firm has other schooners on the way loaded with hay this cargo will be sold cheap, in order to make room for what is coming. 144 A Gratuitous Insult. There is an individual living in Berkeley who runs a sheet called the Weakly Herald, whose chief aim since its revival under the present management, has been to republish a lot of old cuts of faces and buildings in Berkeley, and to foist them upon the people as special editions. His latest attempt was to unload one of those editions on the town of Berkeley as a special school edition and he would have succeeded had not the town attorney stepped in between him and the town treasury with the statement that the Board of Education had no right to expend the town money for any such purposes. The editor of the sheet, however, was persistent and sent a wagon load of the edition to one of the school directors, with the request that he accept them on behalf of the Committee of Supplies. This Director would not do so, and the editor of the Weakly Herald determined to wreck vengeance upon West Berkeley, because that school director is a resident of the western end of the town. Before stating any further his insult to the people of the West End, it might be well to inform the people of Berkeley who this man Winn, editor of the Herald, is. Of his early history we do not know much, but of his late history we have considerable information. In the first place we have any knowledge of him he posed as a Congregational minister in Hollister, where he preached for some little time, but his preaching and his actions were not satisfactory ;o his congregation and he was out of a job. He immediately expressed a change of heart and became a Unitarian minister, and tried that for awhile. Not being a howling sue cess as a Unitarian, he tried running a newspaper, and made a dismal failure of that. All of this dismal experience was in the town of Hollister, San Benito county. When he left that county he went to San Rafael and started a paper, but it did not last long, lor he was sued for libel by Ambrose Bierce, and got out of business there: After a brief interval he turned up in Berkeley and took hold of the Herald. In its last issue it says that West Berkeley is opposed to bonds for a High School because the people of that end of town are poor. After a little more rot he says that West Berkeley wants saloons and East Berkeley wants the High School, and as West Berkeley always has been a kicker and has opposed the progress of the town the sooner it pulls away from the rest of Berkeley and incorporates for itself the better, for then it can have its saloons. We have given a slight account of this man who has been here but a few months, but who sets himself up as a censor for the people of Berkeley and then offers them such gratuitous insults. He is a good deal like his paper, it has a good exterior but the interior is very inferior. He Had Cheek. just lost a couple of minutes time on Shattuck avenue, owing to an expressman who had his wagon backed up with the hor es across the track, who refused to remove the team until he had unloaded his freight. The car driver and his car had not proceeded very far down Addison street, t"ward West Berkeley, when a man stopped his car and wanted to know whether he would not thread a needle for him. "Get off the car," yelled the now in filiated car driver, "do you think that I have got nothing else to do but stop this car and thread needles for you." ' "Well, you needn't �et so mad about it," replied the man, who was none other than the colored bootblack who has a stand on the corner of Center street and Shattuck avenue. "If I had more'n one eye I wouldn't have asked you, cause I could sec to thread it myself." "I am willing to accommodate the public in every way possible," said the driver to the Gazkttk reporter, "but I draw the line at stopping the car to thread needles. University Notes. WAS   I IN   CONTEMPT. H J McCOY FINED $250'OR FIVE DAYS IN JAIL. The senior class at the University of California met yesterday afternoon, and elected the following officers: President, Miss Lou Whipple; first vice-president, C. R. Morse; second vice president, C. W. Morse; third vice-president, Miss I. C. Martin; treasurer, H. M. Wilson; secretary, F. G. Radelfinger; sergeant-at arms, Miss Hattie E. Bienenfeld; historian, E. L. May berry; directors, R. J. Russ, Theodore de Laguna, G. S. Walker, and L. A. Hilborn. P.  L.  Bush, manager of the last' Biue and Gold, submitted a report, j The total receipts from the sale ofj books, from advertisements and from I agsessments was $2185.10  and  the ! total disbursements $2136.07.   There is some money yet owing to the class, j I and enough unpaid debts to make the j account balance $54 on the debtor j side.   This money will probably be j raised by class assessment.   The man-! ager renorted that the books ordered published were  all   sold-something � which has seldom, if ever, happened! before.    Last   year's college annuaVj was the most popular one ever issued. J President Martin KeJIogg will receive members of the faculty and their wives at his home,  Bushnell  place, ] i Berkeley, next Tuesday evening, Octo- i ! ber 8th, from 8 to 11 o'clock.   This is j j the first of a series of receptions which | the president intends giving this col j J lege year. The Prize Fight will Probably Occur at Frederickton New Brunswick. Special illsimlrhi'h io the (Iuzkttr. San Francisco, Oct. 3. The attendance in Judge Murphy's Court today was very small. More medical students were examined on the same line as yesterday, but not one of 'the seventy-six students would swear that he saw Dun ant present, or that they answered present for him. The prosecution will combat the alibi theory as shown by the roll call, by maintaining that Durrant was marked absent and the mark was afterward erased. Secretary H. J. McCoy of the Young Men's Christian Association appeared in Court at 11130 and admitted that he had used the language attribnted to him, but that it was unintentional and a joke. Judge Murphy lectured him and then sentenced him 40 pay a fine of $250 or serve five days in jail. Sentence was suspended until Saturday. -----      -- -   - - Durrant In Effigy. Reno, Nev., Oct. 3 A dummy with a large placard labeled "Durrant" was found hanging from a railroad sign West street this morning. ---        --- The   Corbett-Fltzslmmons   Fight Boston, Oct. 3 -It is reported in sporting circles that arrangements are rapidly progressing to pull off the fight between Corbett and Fitzsimtnons near Frederickton, New Brunswick. It is stated that a prominent sporting man has been in New Brunswick for the past ten days arianging for the battle. Blown to Eternity Chicago, Oct. 3-At Lamont yesterday noon three men were sitting by a box of powder when one of the men lit his pipe and threw the match b,ack of the powder box. In an instant there was an explosion and the three men were blown a distance of 20 feet. One of them whose clothes were on fire plunged into a pool of water and when he was taken out his flesh remained in the water.   All of them will die. Killed His Wife. Chicago, Oct. 3-Edward Moe, a prosperous tradesman, shot and killed his wife today at the North Market Street Hotel, to which place she had gone a short time before with P. T. Nelson, a friend of her husband. Lorln Letter List. List of letters remaining in the Lorin Post-offloe, Alameda County, State of California, Oct. 1. Persons inquiring for any of them will please say they are advertised. If not called for In thirty tluyn Iua? will be Bent Xo th<* Dead Letter Office: Perhaps the present inhabitants are starving. It has always been known that the street car drivers between East and West Berkeley are very accommodating. They always deliver messages or do errands at each end of the line for patrons of the road, even going so far as doing the marketing sometimes. But a car driver's good nature and accommodation has an end sometimes and such was the case with one of them a morning or two ago.   He had Anderson, Mrs H Albert, Mr Oaston Castro, Mrs Carlson, J O Crawford. Mrs J T Craig, Mrs Sophie Dunn. Mrs Chas W Kills, Dr R A Eames, Mary M Hartenson, Miss Ruse Hanlon, C O Klnsella, Mr E J Lovenburg, W O Lorln Jersey B"m D'ry Lewis, D L McLearn, John O Marshall, J. A. Morrlsey, Miss C Miller, S K Marlensteln, Clarence Moody, Mrs W J Martus, Jas H McDonald, Miss Mury Nelson, Hannah A. Peterson, Nels M Potter, Mrs John B Potter, Mrs M E Peterson, Mrs John    ' Rosenthal, Theo M. Ross. Mr Osoar Richajdson, A K Shultz, Miss Mulhlldu Sorrelf, S A Wright, Mrs. S E Williams, Mr. S K Wllley, Mr. John m. Bbkkn, P. M. To Reform Boston. Boston, Oct. 3-The Chamber of Commerce met today and received a report from the Committee on Municipal Reform, composed of former members of the Committee of Seventy. They urged the Chamber to adopt strong measures in opposition to Tarn many hall, and said they had secured S, Bluett arid Dr. Parkhurst to carry out the reform. Real Estate Transfers. James Gamble to H. R. Sorenson east 10 feet of lot 7, block B, Chrystal Springs tract. Ralza A. and Ellen S. Morse to Martha J. McNamara, portion of lot 5, block 4, map of the Villa lots joining the University site on the south. A. H. Powers Jr. to Jeannette, William D. and Francis J. Evarts, all interest in lot 22, lands of Regent-street Homestead Association. John Silvia had a jury trial in Justice James Court last evening. The charge was vagrancy and the result was a disagreement That the Crescent Club will give a dance tomorrow evening that will eclipse anything of the kind ever held in Berkeley. The reception room has been fitted up with whist tables, so that those who do not dance may enjoy themselves in that way. That Ugo Talbot, the great tenor, will sing a solo at the concert to be held in the Gymnasium tomorrow evening. That the Peralta Fire Company will give an entertainment and dance on Saturday evening next, at South Berkeley Hall. That Moses Unda is constantly receiving new bicycles at his cyclery on San Pablo avenue near University avenue. That the new applications which saloon men are required to fill out under the new ordinance, will be given each saloon man in town in a day or two. (�   Advertise in the Gazette. GAZETTtLETS, Collis P. Came to see What could be The trouble with the railroad He had a fit And out he spit Jule Knittschuitt And that cured the railroad. That there were several sensations in Judge Murphy's Court today. The A. O. F. of West Berkeley will meet in regular session this evening at Taylor's Hall. The Young People's Society of the Baptist Church will give an ice cream social at the church tomorrow evening. Property owners would do well to keep track of the large amount of street work that is now being published in the columns of the Gazette. A joint debate of Prof. Gayley's class in Argumentation and the Student's Congress will be held once a month, Prof. Gayley presiding. Jose Santos has lemoved his barber shop from Bristol and Fourth to Bristol and Fifth where he will be pleased to receive friends and patrons.   144 Miss Maud Copeland, a trained nurse in the Lane Hospital in San Francisco, is spending her vacation of a couple of weeks with friends in Berkeley. The residence of Mrs. Briedenbecker on Lincoln street was burglarized yesterday and a large amount of bed clothing and other clothing stolen. There is no clue to the thief. Margaret Mather, the actress, recently cow-hided her husband, Gustav Pabst, son of the millionaire brewer, in the public streets of Milwaukie. Cause so far unknown. The first train on the valley railroad made a preliminary start on the new road yesterday. It was a construction train Much rejoicing was had at Stockton over the event. Paderewski, the pianist, is announced as coming to San Francisco to show bis hair. Oh! Lord, there is a Zulu man in Wast Berkeley who can double discount him when it comes to the hair show. A meeting of the Associated Students is called for next Fridav afternoon, to be held in the Harmon Gymnasium. Important business will be transacted, and everyone's presence is necessary. Elder Daley of the Latter Day Saints will preach the religion of Christ as it was taught by Him while on earth, this evening at the Kindergarten, corner of University avenue and Eighth street, commencing at 7:30. All are invited to these services which -will ean= tinue for fourteen evenings. Ben Morgan was severely injured early this week while engaged in the erection of a shooting box at Tomales bay. The scaffold upon which he was standing gave way, precipitating him to the ground, a distance of ten feet, the fall fracturing his left ankle He will be unable to return to his home in Berkeley for several days. The official appointment of Mayor General Nelson A. Miles as commander of the military forces of the United States has been announced. The officer's friends will not forgive Secretary of War Lamont's calling him a "newspaper soldier" very soon. It was a brief-power attack entirely uncalled for. The new �teamship St Paul, a sister ship of the St Louis, is not a slow vessel by any means. In her trial trip she made 21 knots. It was expected that she would have beaten the St Louis record 22.03 knots. She will probably do better when her machinery gets fairly down to its bearings.   

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