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Bakersfield Californian Newspaper Archive: January 2, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Bakersfield Californian

Location: Bakersfield, California

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   Bakersfield Californian (Newspaper) - January 2, 1954, Bakersfield, California                                TBB WEATSEB Tempcratores Hiili TMterday__ "Low Today KERV COCNTf PROmJCTtO!!. ItW OU_____�199.m,M� Crude Production (hbU.)_   �l,467.in . 33 . r>8 . 35 Expected Hlifh Today___ �xp�cted JjCW Tomorrow _ Rainfall Season Normal______1.92 Total for Season ________,___      l.Off I-a�t Year at This Date_______S.2S Kern RUcr Flow_______^_342 c.f.s. Forecast Fair today, tonictat and Snadayt some cloadlness Sunday; no rain in siclit. Aerlcalture Cotton _ Livestork Potatoes -Grapes _ POPCIATIOS Greater Baliersfleld (1933)-Kern County (1933) . :sl.975.4lt 83.S70,SS� B3.734,S�  - A four-classroom building at the Wahtoke School four miles northeast of here was destroyed by fire late yesterday with a loss estimated by school officials at $40,000. Firemen said the blaze apparently started when fumes from varnish recently applied to the floor were ignited  by  an heater. WHERE REBELS BISECT INDO-CHINA-Arrow across the narrow waist of Indo-Chino from Vietnam coost indicates route of Communist-led Viet Minh forces which captured Thakhek> on the Mekong River border of Thailond. The fall of Thakhek completed th rebel drive to cut Indo-China in two. Thailand defense forces were reported to hove moved heavy artillery into Nakhon Phonom, across the river border from Thakhek. Sabre Jet Sets New Cross-Country Mark NEW YORK UP)-An air National Guard pilot flashed across the continent in little more than four hours today to set a new speed record, slicing some five minutes from the old record. , The unofficial time of the new record from Los Angeles to New Y'ork was 4 hours, 7 minutes and 51 seconds. The old record set on Jan. 26, 1946, was 4 hours and 33 minutes. The pilot. Col. WiUard W. Mil- Reader Index \l\ rase See Auto _______________17 2 Churches ___________7 1 Comics -------------14 2 County -------------6 1 Editorials ___________20 2 Farm _______________5 1 Features ____________15 2 Garden -------------5 1 Local Section--------11 2 Oil_________________4 1 People and Parties----8 1 Picture Page----------10 1 Raa'io --------------4 1 Real Estate---------5 1 Sports --------------16 2 Theaters____________13 2 TV__________t______4 1 Women's Section-----8 1 Eisenhower to See Advisers, Shoot Golf AUGUSTA, Ga. tSP)-President Eisenhower, nearing completion of work on a series of messages to Congress, confers again today with administration advisers. The President scheduled another early morning session in his office at the Augusta National Golf Club. i*p slartQd tlie new year ves-terday witli a four-and-a-half-hoiir morning conference on the oil i State of the Union message which he will deliver to Congress in person next Thursday. Then Eisenhower went off for a round of golf while his aides worked on into the evening on the document. James C. Hagerty, presidential  press  secretaiy,  reported Continued on Page 2 likan, 35-year-old World War II ace, put his F86 Sabre jet down at New York's International Airport, his fuel tanks dry. He had planned to land at the Aiir Force's Mitchell Field, some five miles beyond. The record run was from tlie Los Angeles International Airport to the Naval Air Station at Floyd Bennett Field, Brooklyn. For the record "ah- to air" time Is counted. Millikan made one stop en route. He left Los Angeles at 10:55:55 a.m. (EST) and put down for fuel at Omaha. He was clocked over Floyd Bennett at 2:18:46 p.m. (EST), according to Continued on Page 2 Russ Can Still Stal Big 4 Meet U.S. Suspicious on Soviet Plans Toward France WASHINGTON {!?)- U.S. officials expressed hope today that the Berlin foreign ^ministers meeting actually will open Jan. 25, but they Said the Russians still can stall the conference if they wish. Strong suspicions about Russia's tactics persist because one of Moscow's main purposes in the project is believed to be to delay French action on the proposed European Defense Community and so to delay Western plans for controlled rearmament of West Germany. Russia can forward this aim i*?^ij"sS#|jby keeping alive hope of success-ii' )-Three climbers, isolated overnight by a sudden storm on the snovk--cov-ered slopes of Mt. Hood, walked into Timberline Lodge yesterday. Fred Hart, Corv^allis, Ore.; Art Maki, Ridgefield, Wash.'; and Layden Walsh, Olympia, Wash., were appai'ently tuiharmed by the ordeal. They set out Thursday morning, hoping to be the first 1954 climbers to reach the peak of the 11,245-foot-high mountain east of here. When the storm hit, they waited out the night and made their way down the slopes by use of a compass. fires and 25 others who lost their lives in miscellaneous accidents. The 180 compared to 285 in the same period during the Christmas holiday. The final Clhristmas traffic death total was 523. Lowest Per Mile The Christmas total is included among the National Safety Council's estimated 38,000 persons killed in traffic accidents in 1953, the same as in 1952. It was the first year since 1949 that the toll did not increase. The council said 1953 had the lowest mileage death rate in the history of traffic accident records. It was estimated at 6.9- the number of deaths per 100 million miles. fhe council had estimated 360 persons would be killed in motor mishaps diu-ing the New Year's week end ending midnight Sunday. However, Ned H. Dearborn, (Council president, said if the present rate was maintained for the rest of the holiday period the toll would be under 300, the lowest New Y'ear's traffic death toll since 1949. Drivers Shocked "ApparenUy the shock of the heavy Christmas holiday traffic toll plus the incessant emphasis placed on safety by press, TV and radio has sobered the New Year holiday drivers into better traffic behavior," Dearborn said. There were 407 traffic deaths for a four-day New Year week end last year while the record for four days was 611 in 1951-1952. A non-holiday death test survey, from 6 p.m. Dec. 3 to.midnight Dec. 6, showed that 310 died in Continued on Page 2 North Starts Year With . 4 Fatalities SAN FRANCISCO (UJ?)-Northern California started the new year off on the right foot with one of the best holiday traffic records in recent years. As of midnight New Year's Day, only four persons had been killed in Northern California. Two of the fatalities occurred north of Sacramento. Two others were killed near Fresno. Late last night three persons were critically injured in a collision south of Tulare on Highway 99. The highway and nearby Southern Pacific U-acks were blocked off through the night when butane gas from a truck tanker which crashed with a passenger car spilled over the highway and spread to the tracks. Tulare: District Hospital listed the injured as Dr. Lloyd Steiner, 29, and his 27-year-oId wife, both of New Westminster, B.C. The truck driver was identified as Warren Prettyman of Fresno. The San Francisco Bay area did not record a single fatality from 6 p.m. New Year's Eve until midnight New Y'ear's Day. Two airmen attached to Travis Continued on Page 2 Gen. Astray Dies MADRID, Spain iff)-Gen. Jose Millan Astray, founder of the Spanish Foreign Legion and one of his country's leading military figui-es, died today of a heart attack at his home here. He was 74. Repatriate Calls for POW Weapon Hunt Hit-Run Driver Injures Newsboy SAN FRANCISCO (U.R)-A 14-year-old' newsboy was struck and critically injured yesterday by a hit-run driver who fled from the scene as the boy lay screaming. Police said the newsboy, Conrad Hightower, was knocked 30 feet from the street onto the sidewalk by the car. Neighbors came to his aid when they heard his screams. Mission Emergency Hospital attendants said the youth suffered a compound leg fracture and internal iiyuries. SEOUL (Sunday) - (INS) - The self-proclaimed "number one boss" of Americas pro-Communist pi'isoners in Korea will be flowii to an army hospital in Tokyo today after calling for seizure of hidden weapons in the camp where the POW's are held. Cpl. Claude J. Batchelor, 24, of Kermit, Tex., said other American captives might renounce communism if knives and other i weapons in their camp were confiscated, making it possible for them to ask repatriation without fear of reprisals. He also suggested a neutral screening of the American POW's I) give some of his ""mixed up" former companions a chance to return home. A spokesman for Indian custo- statements, claiming tliere was "no evidence" that the prisoners have knives. The spokesman said there would be no investigation. But w. allied spokesman said he presumed Indian guards would make a checkup at the camp of American and South Korean prisoners similar to one they made 'ist Thursday at a camp of anti-Conmiunist Chinese 'POW's. In that checkup 135 out of 4,385 Chinese asked repatriation to Red China. Batchelor told newsmen Saturday he was "number one* boss" the American prisoners but changed his jnind about remain-in| under communism because of "letters from the outside" and "conditions in the camp." He declined to give details, an- dial forces challenged Batchelor'siswering questions along that line! by saying he "preferred not to answer just now." It was assumed he had been limited in his disclosures by Army intelligence agents so as to protect other GI's who .may want to return. Batchelor spent his second night of freedom from the Communists in 38 months at the 121st evacuation hospital near Seoul. He will be flown to Tokyo'at lOj a.m. today (5 p.m. Saturday PST). An Eighth Army spokesman said the Texas GI was now "in medical channels." The same procedure was followed in the case of Cpl. E^dward S. fiickenson of Big Stone Gap, Va., the first of the American POW's to renounce communism. As in the case of Dickenson,, it was expected that Batchelor would not be permitted to talk to newsmen again until he has reed a thorough checkup at the Tokyo Army hospital. Batchelor said the other Americans were falsely told by the Communists that Dickenson had been tried for treason although he actually was given a furlough to wed his hometown sweetheart. Batchelor, while referring to himself as "number one" leader of the Americans, said there were other leaders, mcluding Sgt. Richard Corden of East Pi-ovi-dence, R.I., and that tight control was exercised hy hard-core South Korean pro-Reds. He said the Americans were promised fully paid trips "ail over the world," any careers they wanted and that they would never have to worry about money. Knowland Sees Teamwork' in Second Session WASHINGTON (INS) - Senate GOP leader William F. Knowland predicted today that the second session of the 83rd Congress opening Wednesday will be marked by "teamwork" and a lack of obstructionism from either party. The   Californian,   discounting loud complaints from Democrats angered by Republican attacks on their ranks, told newsmen: v/e are all in the same plane and "I think we all recognize that all get caught in the same that if the plane goes down we crackup." Knowland and other GOP legislative leaders will confer with President Eisenhower at the White House Monday morning. Presumably they will get a preview at that time of Eisenhower's State-of-the-Union message and program details. Early Action On Tuesday the President has invited Democratic leaders of both houses of Congress in for a look at the foreign policy and defense segments of his program Continued on Page 2 Expect Fire to Be Under Control Today LOS ANGELES (U-E)-Firefighters expected today to bring under control a week-oUI forest fire that has blackened more than 15.000 acres in Angeles National Forest. A second and smaller fire in the Mt. Baldy area, 15 miles east of the- Mt. WilsoB blaze, was brought under control yesterday after burning more than 7,800 acres of watershed. The U.S. Forest Service said only 2'-4 mUes of the lai-ger fire's 36-mile perimeter remained out of control. Barring unexpected winds, the blaze was expected to be fully under control shortly after daybreak. No homes near the stiU uncontrolled section in the west fork of San Gabriel Canyon were reported in danger. A flareup only 1V4 miles from Pasadena Glen, a community of 50 homes, was squelched yesterday before residents were forced to evacuate. More 'than 1,100 firefighters were battling the blaze, located near Mt. Wilson.. Forest dispatchers said the fires caused some eight million dollars damage to watersheds, but that heavy rains or floods this winter could run the total to "an untold amoimt." Costly Party CHICAGO la^The New Year's Eve party Mrs. Isabelle Tagllere attended was a costly one. Mrs. Tagliere, 51, a widow, told Albany Park police yesterday that while she was at the party burglars broke into her home and took .$500 cash and furs and jewelry she valued at 10,695. Son Fires Four Shots at Father From Doorway A 41-year-old oilworker pursuing his wife outside their Lamont home last night was shot to death when his son fired three bullets into the running man. The victun, A. D. Barn-hart, 156 Rose St., Lamont, dropped dead to the driveway, with three bullets from a .30-.30 caliber rifle in the upper part of his body. Slieriffs investigators are hold;-ing the  son,  Monroe  Howard Barnhart, 20, in connection with the shooting. Family Sees Shootinc Dep'. Coroner Stanley Newman said the victim's wife, Ona Mae, and the couple's six other children witnessed the shooting. Recounting events leading up to the shooting, Newman said Barnhart returned from work at the Richard Reams Oil Co. plant at 3:30 p.m. He reportedly had been drinking and had threatened the wife and their children, ranging in age from 20 to 3. He left agam at 6:30 p.m., returning an hour later to agahi threalen his wife.. Monroe Barnhart said he struggled with his father when the latter picked up a knife in the kitchen and pursued his wii'a tlu'ougli the house.  ' Takes Four Shots Slipping from his son's grasp, Barnhart is said to have run outside, again in pursuit of his wife. The son ran to his room to got the lever-action rifle and then stepped to the door to fli'e. Newman said the boy fhed four fast shots from the hi]) just as his father was rounding the corner of the house. On struck the victim bet\WEeii the shoulders, and a second caught him in the right side. A third bullet passed through the fleshy part of the right shoulder. A fourth shot missed its mark. A neighbor, William Steward, 141 Wood Stl, Lamont, also witnessed the shooting. Steward said he had been at the Barn-harts' during the afternoon watching television. Being questioned at the jail today, the shooting suspect said his father had threatened on several occasions to kill his wife and family. Ship Arrives in Port After Crash at Sea SAN FRANCISCO UP) - Churn-uig along at unusual speed, although two holds were flooded, the freighter Permanente Silver-bow reached San Francisco harbor today for repair of damage received in a collision. The Kaiser-owned vessel, built to carry bulk dry cement cargoes, was empty. She proceeded to BetJJehem Shipyard No. 2. The other vessel involved, the freighter Colorado, followed the Permanente Silverfaow Into port fomfepair. The 7,629-ton ore carrier, southbound from Portland, Ore., with 40-45 crewmen, collided late last night with the Manila-bound 7,606-ton freighter Colorado, about 145 miles north of San Francisco. The Colorado's forepeak .was flooded but she reported no danger. Henry J. Hhiser's Permanente Steamship Co. of Oakland operates the ore ship and the Colorado is owned by the States Steamship Co. of New York.   

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