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Arcadia Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 21, 1936 - Page 1

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Publication: Arcadia Daily Tribune

Location: Arcadia, California

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   Arcadia Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - January 21, 1936, Arcadia, California                                 Arcadla*» Home  Newspaper .  « è  ALL THE HOME NEWS ALL THE TIME  Phone 21 Ji  THE ARCADIA  Arcadia's Home Newspaper  DEVOTED TO THE PROGRESS AND PROSPERITY OF ARCADIA  «»»UNE WANT ADS GET RESULTS  Phone 2131  Vol. t, No. 19  Arcadia, California, Tuesday, January 21, 1936  Single Copy Sc  TO LOCHTE FUR  FOB Hfll STOCK  Rabbit Growers Of Arcadia Will Benefit By Having Plant In Nearby City  HATTER’S STOCK FEATURED  Reliable Fur Industrie» Of Montebello Sponsor Project, Announcement Says  Announcement was made today that a new rabbit fur plant will be located in Pico, sponsored by the Reliable Pur Industries of Mnote-bello.  Located on Durfee road near Whittier boulevard, the purpose of the plant will be to cut rabbit fur into "hatters” from which felt hats are made, it was announced by M. H. Brossa, co-partner of the industry with W. P. Buzaid.  “This industry will be conducive to rabbit growers of California,” Brossa declared, “especially to rab-bit-growers ln thi sterritory who will be so close to the plant which Is the direct manufacturers of the semi-finished article.”  Heretofore, the headquarters for all felt hat manufacturing has been in Danbury, Conn., called the “Hat (Sapitol” of America. Operation of the plant at Pico will be identical to that performed in Danbury, it was revealed here.  Buzaid has been in the fur-cutting business for 40 years and hails from Danbury. He disclosed that the United States produces only one per cent of the requirements of the hat trade, with 99 per cent coming from Prance, Germany, Australia and the Orient.  Brossa, who has been in the business since 1926, stated today:  “The future of the industry lies in efficient handling and utilization of products and by-products of the rabbit industry which this new firm will generously contribute to efficient new methods in manufactur-  B#y Scouts Receive New Badges  Stierirt Eugene VV. liiscailuz presenting Boy Scouts with new sponsorship badges from the department. Left to right, front, Sheriff tfiscailuz, Kobert Glaze, Loren White, and Captain O. A. Gregg, indicating “Tenderfoot Badge.” Kear row, lelt to right, Kobert Wnite, Robert Gregg, Paul Kennedy and Mill Redmond. Inset, sponsorship ftadge.  IN STATEMENT  Attorney Samuel A. King Says Indictment Against Solon Not Backed By Proof  REVEALS MANY DETAILS  Believes Court Erted In Presenting Case To Jury And .  Denying New Trial  In a communication to the Arcadia Tribune, Attorney Samuel A.  King, chief counsel for Congressman Hoeppel, stated that the indictment found against him and his son, Charles J. Hoeppel, in which  b  they were charged with conspiracy j pating in the contest is sure of  Contest Details Held Iip Until Tomorrow  Announce men t was made this* morning by Gordon R. Bentrod of the Dally Tribune staff . . . the man in charge of the greatest campaign ever to be staged in this territory . . . that the start of the contest drive is to be postponed one day.  But the great opportunity offered every contestant in this event can keep one more day. As was published In. yesterday's issue of the Tribune, a $1100 Oldsmo-bile Sedan goes to the winner of this circulation-building, gift-dis-tribution campaign.  Tomorrow the detailed facts of this contest in which everybody wins will be given to the public. The Oldsmobile goes to the win-other top awards are: $300 in cash for second place; $100 for third; and fourth and fifth prizes of $50 each. And» what is the best piece of news, is that everyone psurtici-  WORLD WIDE NEWS FLASHES  From International News Service  NATIONS MOURN KING’S DEATH  LONDON, Jan. 21. 21. (INS)—Prom every point in the British Empire messages poured into London today, telling of the grief caused by the death of King George V.  The messages conveyed sympathy to Queen Mary and encouragement to the new monarch, Edward VII, in the admittedly difficult task he faces.  Dispatches came from India, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, in* of hatter's fur, taken mostly I  Canada and even more  remote outposts of the Empire, from California rabbits. This new .  TC> KYO, Jan. 21. <INS) Emperor Hirohito today ordered three weeks firm will help the outlook of the  01 court n,ournlng ln honor of  the late King George.  rabbit growers of the southland COPENHAGEN, Jan. 21. (INS)—Three weeks of court mourning  who have tried Jor years to produce  was  ordered today in memory of the late King George of England this animal on a commercial basis/ 1 1    _  ROME, Jan. 21. (INS)—Anglo-Italian political differences, which several times in recent months have threatened war in the Mediterranean, were forgotten today in sorrow over the passing of #ing George. Pifteen days of court mourning was ordered.  Premier Mussolini telegraphed Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin: “The Italian people received with profound emotion news of the death of King George, and take a sympathetic part in the mourning and sadness oi the British nation.“  by agreeing to appoint James W. Ives, a cadet to the United States Military Academy at West Point in considera:ion of the payment to Charles J. Hoeppel of $1,000.00, was not . substantiated by the evidence. Upon this conspiracy charge, Congressman Hoeppel and his son were tried and convicted, after which a motion for a new trial and a motion in arrest of judgmant were interposed and by the court overruled.  Mr. King stated that, in his judgment, there was no legal foundation for the finding of the indictment and that/in addition, not only was the verdict absolutely contrary to the evidence but it was clearly shown that no statute of the United States had been violated.  Mr. King further stated that he is firm in his conviction that the Court erred not only in submitting j the case to the jury but in denying the motions which had been filed for a new trial and arrest of Judgment.  At the present time, Mr. King is perfecting an appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Dis-  capturin# a share of the total award.  TAX EQUALITY  (Continued on Pasre 4)  Stock Market  ResuM  NifAT YORK, Jan. 21. (INS)— Stock prices drifted lower today wit hthe exception of a few individual strong spots.  Passage of the bonus, long accepted as a foregone conclusion, had no effect, nor was there any London selling noted or expected as a result of King George's death. In  FUNERAL OF KING ANNOUNCED  LONDON, Jan. 21. (INS)—The funeral of the late King George will be held next Tuesday at the Royal St. George's Chapel, at Windsor, it was announced officially today.  SEEK JUNIOR PRISON SITE  V  LOS ANGELES, Jan. 21. (INS)—The committee headed by A. N. Stoekburger, State Director of Finance, appointed to select the site for  fflft tho new kin* often hailed as I  a Junlor prl80n in Southern  California, today continued its inspection fact, the new King, oiten nailed as  of more than seventy  lotions which had been offered to it. The avail-  the empires best salesman, is ex-  a bi e s j tes were  understood to be ln Los Angeles, Riverside. Orange. San  pected to have a vitalizing influ- Bernardino, Kern, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.  ence on British business.    I The commission was accompanied in its tour by Wardens Court  Among individual features were Smith of Folsom Penitentiary and J. B. Holohan of San Quentin Peni-  Douglas Alrcrait, which ran up a | tentlary,  point to a new high, Brooklyn-Man-  hattan Transit, which spurted Vh I    KINGBIRD BATTLES REFLECTION  8, reflecting a sharp earnings in-    NEfiVHALL, Cal., Jan. 21. (INS)—Business in this little town has  crease, and Manati Sugar Ped,    almost at a standstill today as residents gathered to watch the fifth day  which rose nearly a point to a new    of a furious battle waged between an irate Kingbird nd his reflection.  1935-36 peak.     11  started last Friday morning when the bird noticed his reflection  Rail shares ignored estimates     in a  window. Swooping at the intruder, he received a surprise counter-  STATE STUÖIEB  Santa Fe Files Application For Use Of Stages In Service In California  Los Angeles will be the scene of the first of a series of hearings held by the California State Railroad Commission in considering applica-tons fled by the Santa Fe Transportation Company requesting permits to use its new operating interstate passenger stages in point to point service within California. The date of the hearing is set for March 3, 193G.    |  It is expected that hundreds of ]  Southern California Official* To Convene In City ionite For Open Pow-Wow  Initial steps in a move which might revolutionize the tax theme of incorporated and unincoi*porated areas of the county will b*e taken tonight at 6:30 dinner-meeting of southland city and county officials in the main dining room oi the Santa Anita Inn.  Called by Mayor H. E. Reavis vf Sierra Madre, outstanding dignitaries of several county municipalities have accepted invitations to attend tonight’s discussion. Herbert C. Legg and members of the Los Aageles County Board of Supei*visors will be among those taking part in the debate tonight.  "Tax Equalization“ is the general subject to be discussed irom all on-gles. The meeting tonight comes about following an open forum on the question staged in Sierra Madre two weeks ago at which time Gordon Whitnall, originator of the so- \ i caTed “tax equalization” plan, presented details to a group of interested parties. Legg was present at the Sierra Madre confab, and it was  Burglary Reports Cease As Full-Coverage Patrol Get Started; Uniformed Officer, Plain-Clothers Man In Each Car  Giving Arcadia Protection Against Crime  i .  ! RACE TRACK POLICE VOLUNTEER SERVICES IN CAMPAIGN  I    ____  Chief Of Police Don Ott Clamps Down On "Reign Of Terror” Of After-Dark Burglaries Reported Here Over Past Three  Weeks; Concentrated Campaign Planned Here  ■» i i <■  Clamping down on the “reign of terror” in Arcadia through  the string of burglaries reported here over the past month, Chief  of Police Don Ott today announced that «even cars are now  nightly patrolling the city thoroughly.  Wih the city divided into seven?  •districts, a car has been assigned to I •each area, with a uniformed officer and a plain-clothes man in each * -car. Since the full coverage patrol ! has been inaugurated, not a single ) burglary or attempted burglary has v been filed at the police station.  Officers working at the track dur-i ing the day time have volunteered ! their services an dears in thi$ cam-| paign to trap /the individual or In gang which have been making hauls here with regularity. Most Of the burglaries reported show that the “take,” for the most part, has either been clothes or guns, ’in several instance*, cash has been overlooked by the “after-dark'* prowlers.  “We are making a determined aitud against this burglarizing business in Arcadia, and the seven-patrol system appears to be the best and most thorough .way to combat it/’ Ott declared.  BUILDING Si JUMPS HIGHER  Permits Taken Out By L. A. Turf Club Shoots Month Above $60,000  Funeral Services For Henry W-  Haines'T.Ojfte HeW In Monrovia,Friday  f Henry William Haines, 52^ of 415 r South First avenue, passed away at [j ihis home, 415 South Jrtrst avenue j today. ¿Funeral services <,*111 be ob-  A $24,100 permit issued to the Los Angeles Turf Club for additional buildings at Santa Anita Park yesterday shot the January totals up above the $60,000 mark, it was revealed this morning at the city hall.  This permit raises this month's sum to $60,775, Glen Watson, building inspector announced.  The Turf Club's permit, issued upon the completion of the work, requested permits for the following items:  Two stables, $7,700; odd's board, $1,900; toilets under the grandstand, $450; shelter ln center of receiving barn, $450. two betting booths, $1,600; passenger elevator, $12,000.  Other permits issued for large amounts since the announcement ,pf last week follow: C. Jernegan, *yi5 .South Fourth avenue, house, gasage, and chicken house, $3,000; iJohri I. Donnellan, 250 West Duarte xoad, '$3.500.  CIÏÏ SUED FOB  this important matter.  mmr  PARADE „  V j m t    yj./. fi 7 E M AK  Wrerifcing-cars with radio sets witnesses will testify at the first/i tJruise until reception gets hearing. In addition scores of reso- J Call ¡announcing auto smash, lutions and endorsements from civic* , i Beat police to scene of crash, commercial and political organize-* , California newsmen's meet tions as well as individuals aiadîij Thinks high taxes are a cheat.  that loadings in the past week approximated 625,000 cars, a substantial gain over a year ago and a more than season gain over the preceding week.  With the Supreme Court recessed  blow. After a few Jails he retired to gather food, and then returned with renewed vigor.  Betting so far is about even.  business firms will be presented tu*\ the Railroad Commission support- ' ing the applications.  Of panicular interest are en~ do!> j ments coming from the Broth.-*  irtnir‘ S eJon‘iha”t'it''ro'dMfed \    with  to hold . county-wide gathering on ,    “.“«o*. ,n  * »charge.  ( Interment will be held at the "Live «Oak Cenaetery at 2 p. m. Friday with Rev. N. Milo Flske, pastor of the Arcadia Gwununity Church in •charge.  Born in Goshen* Ind., on April 7, 1**83. Mr. Haines ¿a.me to Arcadia | IS years a«o. He served several | years on the Arcadi* ¡police depart-i ment, resigning on -August 1, 1933. At that time he tmw night desk swgeant.  He is survived by ins &vife. Mrs. Ida Haines, three sans. *Kenaeth Haines of Diamond atreet,. 2Arca4ia. and Robert and George lifcjfkes at home, one sister, Mrs. D. W Mc-Klbben of Indiana,  Mildred Lewis Oi Monrovia To  Seek SI5,000; Blames City And Officials In Suit  .1  A Montana schoolma’am has Riiie to control her class.  Huey Long's voice loudly pan^ Foes as usual, out of cans; Canned sound is uncanny vvluui  erhood of Locomotive Engineers at. : Dead men rise to speak again.  FILM STAR GUARDED  CHICAGO, Jan. 21. (INS)—Constance Talmadge, movie star of the  niit.ll Fohnmrv 3 utilltv shares I  days of sllent iUms '  was belleved beln S guarded by Federal agents in y .    __j Florida today as the result of what Chicago police believe was an at  tempt to kidnap her here yesterday.  weakened further in reflecting dls-’ appointment over delay in the TVA decision.  Motor shares, which are expected to benefit substantially through payment of the bonus, continued sluggish with fractional losses prevailing.  NE WYORK, Jan. 21. (INS)— Stocks—Generally lower.  Surb—‘Moderately lower.  Pond*—Generally firm.  LOSS OF PLANE ANNOUNCED  ROME, Jan. 21. (INS)—Loss of an Italian bombing plane on  fV »o Northern Ethiopian front was officially announced today in Communique No. 102, which told of further Italian successes in the south.  HOUSE WILL APPROVE BILL  WASHINGTON, Jan. 21. (INS)-—The House will speedily approve the Senate's “baby bond” soldiers' bonus bill tomorrow, Speaker Joseph W. Byrns said today.   M It ought not to take the House more than an hour and a half, 1 ' he ^dded.  Buffalo man has an invention For sonorous snore prevention;  II it cures talk in your sleep,  Fancy price would still be cheap Epics state their ultimatum, Roosevelt's coolness stems to grated 'em;  Sinclair sttll sits in his corner kike a will-expectant mourner.  So what I I    R. M. ORR  Needles, Richmond and other state transportation centers which urge the Railroad Commission to act favorably upon the applications of the?/  Santa Fe Transportation Company, i an affiliate oi the Santa Fe Railway..  Following the hearing at Los An** ge'es, the Railroad Commission will hold hearings at San Diego,. Santa Ana, San Bernardino. Bakersfield,  Fresno, Stockton, San Francisco and other points in California.  Wide interest has been aroused throughout the state in the Santa Fe's applications which official of the company declare will settle the question as to whether highways of  California will be monopolized by    SECOKI> KAC E  the Southern Pacific and Its affiU-  1  j, arp  o’Gold    8.80 4.80  ates, notably the Pacillc Greyh-ound Asleep Lines or opened to competition. \  IU)tLU;   AYVaitJtijy word from the Superior Court, the i.eity of Arcadia, it was learned today, will answer charges in a suit Hied %tus week naming the city and Its otftewls defendants in a $15.000 damage    by Mildred  Lewis of Monrovia.  In her complaint, Miss Lewis charges negligence on the part of city ofiiclals, causing- her to be involved ln an auto acldent several months ago on Huntington Drive just this side of Sierra Madre avenue.  The history of the case in brief finds tt»t Arcadia po’.lce had warned Joe Berger of Los Angeles to move his car over to the side of the troad as he awaiting repairs, or else jt-ave warning lights on the vehicle.  Tonight—Dinner-meeting of civic j    ....  and county officials for discussion f *35iiis was not done, and Jus a  inter, ln the gathering dusk, a car  Today’s Results  FIRST RACE I'ncle Gus    36.80 22.40  Tounlin    10.40  BUI The Kid  on "Tax Equalization*’ at Santa Anita Inn, 6:30 o’clock. \  ♦ •• 9    \  January 24th- -Men'a Fellowship dinner-meeting at Cojnmnsity Church. Dr. Stewart McLennan, speaker.  $.w]|  4.4X1  Saturday, January  ! 25th—Public dance at American Legiq n hall, I>on Williams' orchestra.  dmrn by Herman Froley of Monrovia.. in which Miss Lewis was a p^6«euLger. crashed into the rear of tivs Ber v ger machine  woman had three teeth knoefced out and suflered lacerations,, shtwk and other injuries. A claim lor damages has previously £t?en pr(V>ent<£d the city, but weie  rtu-nied.  4M  City Attorney William Flam today Arcadia Tfeeaiu*    that when the suit Ale is ro-  3-W) j Starts tonight for two days—Carl N^ceired here, the city council will 3.20, Brlsson in “Ship Cafe n ; palso JametJ act *on it. and probably instruct its VM Dunn in  M Bad Boy."    1 atomey to file an answer charge.   

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