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Arcadia Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 18, 1936 - Page 1

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Publication: Arcadia Daily Tribune

Location: Arcadia, California

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   Arcadia Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - January 18, 1936, Arcadia, California                                 i!n  ÍÍ  #• •  .jVi  I  I  ■V. ‘  )  *•  Í  ' fÀ;  »rÿ»  Af*CMlfa*t Nmim  MewMpaper .  \  ALL THE H^B NRIV8 ALL THE'. TIME  _i__  Flkofie 21 Jl  -v.'  THE ARCADIA  r  TRIBUNE  DEVOTED TO THE PROGRESS AND PROSPERITY OF ARCADIA  Arcailfa’i Home Newspaper  TRIBUNE WANT ADg GET RESULTS  Pilone 21 JI  Vol. I,No. 17  Arcadia^ Caiiforniat Saturday, January IB, 1936  Single Copy 5c  ’’f  DQE BREEDEfIS  WOKLD WIDE NEWS FLASHES  From internationat News Service  KEY FIGURES BEHIND REPRIEVE REVEALED  NEW YORK, Jan. 18. (INS)—^The “l^ey figures” behind Gov. Hoffman’s reprieve of Bruno Richard Hauptmann are an ex-officer of the German army—a gassed and wounded aiien—and his wife, who lived in a stone house a half mile south of Col. Lindbergh’s home in Hopewell, the Evening Journel says today in an exclusive story.  xThe pair, who were questioned secretly after the kidnaping of the Lindbergh baby and then forgotten w!)en they produced an alibi for the night of Mar/Ch 1, 1932, were found, by the Journal In Hillsdale, N. Y., about 38 miles southeast of Albany.  They are ftrnest Wend, 40, and his Russian-born wife, Dr. Mary  Track Scandals investigated At Santa Anita  Llcberman.Äraduate oí Columbia University and a dentist at tlie State Hospltel- in vudson, N. Y.  A  KING GEORGE SERIOUSLY ILL  A  >NE^N,i^,/an.' 18. (INS)—King George’s illness, which is causing cohoern throughout the Empire today, comes from a condition he ed in the line of duty.  bronchial weakness which has occasionally troubled him In the past seven ^Yintcr5 was a result of an ofilcial function which has ended th3 ^career of ^everkl elder European Statesmen—^the laying of the wreaw on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in the cold drizzling rain of Nov^l  ,ber 11, Armistice day.  Premiuni Lists Sent Out By Pak-adena Kennel Club, Backers Of Midwinter Event  FEBRUARY DATES REV  m  Trio Of International To Select Prize-Winneri For Mammoth Event  Premium lists today were In hands of Arcadia owners of purebred canines for the Pasadena NarJ tlonal Midwinter Dog Show, to be staged February 15 and 16, In the Crown City's ornate civic auditorium. Jack Bradshaw, Jr., of Los Angeles, is superintendent of the show, the first major canine event on the coast for 1936.  Among prominent residents of this city who have received premium lists, with the breeds they favor, are: Mrs. Wm. F. Ascher. dachshude;W. H. P. Cowles, cocker spaniels; G. N. Crall, great Dane;  Mrs. Jack Davis, collie; C. O. Holmgren, English springer spaniel; Don F. Kuhn, German shepherd; W. H. and Lillian Lanterman, cocker spaniels; W. M. La Selle, great Dane;, WASHINGTON, Jan. 18. (INS)~^Uncle Sam has decided to put “G’' Alfred Mat^-os, Irish setter; Lewis Men on the trail of some 20 or 30 munitions makers who have failed to T. McLean, bull terrier; Mrs. A. J. i register with the State Department under the Munitions Act, Secretary  Miss Alice Joy, Boston, Gives Principal Address At Noon Luncheon  TELLS OF TREK FROM EAST  \  Speaker Confuses Clubmen In Making Spectacular Appearance At Tavern  The capacity of the Derby Tavern was taxed yesterday noon as the Rotarians observed ladles’ day.  The feminine aspect; was carried out even to the principal speaker. Miss Alice Joy, from Boston, who appeared in a most unusual man-LONDON. Jan. 18. (INS)—^Burial In the Poets’ Corner of Westmlns- ner. There was also a high school ter Abbey for Rudyard Kipling, among England’s other great writers and»girl present in addition to the usual near the builders of the Empire he loved, was planned today by authori- \ high school boy. The program was  a complete surprise to every one and confusion reigned as a lady appeared in the lobby in a highly  ROME, Jan, 18. (INS)—Ethiopian casualties In the big battle of the ««I’vous state, imploring Dr. Car-Ganale Dorya River mounted to 5,000 today as Gen. Rodolto Graziani’s    i'O accompany her to an  PL4N KIPLING BURIAL IN POET’S CORNER  ETHIOPIAN CASUALTIES REPORTED HIGH  legions raced relentlessly after the fleeing enemy.  SEND G-MEN TO Vk^ORK  of State Cordell Hull disclosed today.  FOURTEEN PERISH IN PLANE CRASH  Polach, chlcuahuas; E. L. Renault, dachshunde; Jean Riddle, great Dane; Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Shipley,  cockep spaniel: A. R. Thrabis, chow lapaZ, Bolivia, Jan. 18. (INS)—Thirteen passengers and the pilot chows; Miss Louise Vlnsonnaler, ^ passenger plane owned by a Bolivian Company perished today when  emergency case. There being no Dr. Carpenter in the meeting, Dr. I. N. Kendall attempted to quiet her but she would have none of it. Finally she made her way to where Arcadia's most eligible bachelor was seated and it-was only -then that the ruse was discovered. She was the speaker for the day and after introducing herself, went into her talk. According to her story, Miss Joy made a bet with Jack Curley, then mayor of Boston, that she could travel from Boston to Hollywood without working or stealing. She was to get by on her own resource-  LOS ANGELES, Jan. 18, (INS)—An Impregnable military defense In iul^iess and was to keep in daily the Hawaiian Islands is vital to the safety of the United States, MaJ. touch with her home twice daily,  once by phone and once by letter,  the craft plunged into a swamp near Cochabamba.  Cause of the disaster was not immediately ascertained.  HAWAII DEFENSE NEEDED  Scottish terriers.  Three internationally famed Judges will be brought more than 1,500 miles to collaborate with two coast experts in the rings. They are Joseph L. Dodds, of Vancouver, B.  nnnpnb!^mpr nf    Hugh A. Drum, Commander of the Hawaiian Department of the  Cana^;    United States Army, declared here today as he prepared to sail tonight  Seattle, and official of the Puget    Lurllne. for his post.  Sound Kennel Club; and Alex Sell, -------------------------------------------  of Dallas, Tex., who has Judged  America’s largest shows. Mrs. A. O. Wilson, of Los Angeles, widely known breeder and exhibitor; and Mrs. Frank Porter Miller, wife of the president of the Pasadent Kennel Club and famed animal painter,  BOUNDARiES OF ALL CITY VOTING PRECiNCTS CtVEN TODAY; GROWTH  IN POPULATtON BRiNGS CHANGE  of  Arcadia during the past 24 who will Judge the children’s hand- nionths, this year made it necessary  Growth in population in the clty^Va!nett from Sixth to Tenth, and  then Jogs south on Tenth to the  ling classes, complete the roster The fame of the Judges Is expected to turn out an even larger  (Continued on Pafire 4)  to add three new voting precincts, it was revealed yesterday at the city hall.  While several of the precincts will keep their same boundaries, many of the more thickly-populated areas have been chopped into smaller units, the map showing the districts disclosed.  Following Is the complete list of all 13 precincts:  Precinct No, 1—North of Colorado boulevard to the ioothills, all of NEW YORK, Jan. 18. (INS)—De-' Foothill boulevard, bounded on the  Clines ranging from a small fraction to nearly 2 points were registered' in today’s brief session on the stock market. All groups drifted lower in rather dull trading.  Traders seemed more inclined to await some new development either Jn the form of a supreme court decision on thj TVA or something in regard to the future fiscal policy of the government.  Reports from steel centers Indicated that operations next week would begin about 1 per cent higher at 52V2 per cent.  Industrials, rails and utilities all moved lower in the reaction. Motors, steels, alcohols and oils were among the most active of the ¿iiiares.  Bonds moved in an irregular manner. Commodities ^ were fea-  west by Sierra Madre avenue, and including the Santa Anita Rancho tract.  Precinct No. 2—Bounded on the north by Colorado boulevard, from Santa Anita avenue to Fifth avenue, down the west side of Santa Anita to California, over the north side of California to Second avenue, north on the west side of Second avenue to Huntington drive, east on the north side of Huntington drive to Fifth avenue.  Precinct No. 3—Including the area south of Huntington drive and below the southern boundary of Precinct No. 2, and coming over the north side of El Dorado from Filth avenue to Second, down the east side of Second to Fano, and over the north side of Fano to Santa Anita.  Precinct No. 4—Includes Ross  tured by a sharp rise in coffee fol-    o  lowing announcement that the Bra- Field, and then swings down Santa  zilian government would destroy Anita from lower Huntington drive.  more of the beans. Wheat and cotton were steady.  I  I  Î  •A  \ NJIW YORK, Jan. 18. (INS)— Markets at a glance: SiockJ^Irregularly lower.  Curb—Irregularly lower.  Bonds—Moderately higher.  Call Money—% per cent.  to Duarte road, over the north side of Duarte road, and up Fifth to the southern boundary of Precinct No. 3.  Precinot No. 5—Bounded on the north by Duarte road, on the west by the east side of First avenue, on the south by the north side of Val-nett, and on the east by the west jlde of Sixth avenue.  Cotton—Olf 15 to 30 cents.  Foreign Exchange — Dollar de- Precinct No. 6—Bounded on the dined.    ‘ north by the city limits, Just south  Chicago Wheat^-Slightly higher, of Puarte road, on the south by  city limits.  Precinct No. 7—Included area lying between Valnett and Las Tunas, and Santa Anita avenue and the cUy limits.  Precinct No. 8—Swings along east on lower Huntington drive to Santa Anita, Jogs down Santa Anita avenue to Duarte, over the south side of Duarte to the west side of First avenue, down First to Valnett, over the north side of Valnett to Santa Anita, and thence south on the west side of Santa Anita to Las Tunas, and west on Las Tunas to Holly avenue.  Precinct No. 9—Bounded on the north by Lemon avenue, the south by Las Tunas, the east by Holly, and the west by Baldwin.  Precinct No. 10 — Bounded on south by Lemon avenue, north on Holly to Naomi, over south side of Naomi to Lovell, north on the west side of Lovell to Duarte, over south side of Duarte road to Baldwin.  Precinct No. 11—Bounded on south by northern side of Naomi between Holly and Lovell, then swings north on Holly to Huntington drive, over the south side of Huntington drive to La Cadena, south on west side of La Cadena to Fairvlew, west on the south side of Fairvlew to Baldwin, then south on the east side of Baldwin to Duarte, east on the north side oi Duarte to Lovell, south on the east side of Lovell to Naomi.  Precinct No. 12—Bounded on north by south side of Fairvlew. on the east by the west sidt* oi Baldwin, on the south by both sides of Duarte road, and on the west by city limit boundary.  Precinct No, 13—Bounded on the nonh by the south side of Huntington drive, on the east by the west side of La Cadena, on the south by the north side of Fairvlew, and on the west by -the city limit bom:idary.  without paying a charge for either one at the sending end. This was an involved arrangement but was accomplished. The manner in which she called out the names of certain members and looked at them as if she had known them all her life was almost psychic.  SANTA ANITA RACETRACK. Arcadia, Calif., Jan. 18. (INS)—Two track scandals were under Investigation by officials here today.  The first case of h3.se doping at Santa Anita Is said to have been revealed.  Racing information of value to bookmakers is leaking from the track.  With one trainer and three horses suspended by the board oi stewards of Santa Anita, the doping case was under consideration by the California Horse Racing Board today. According to the stewards, the horse doped was Silva, owned by I. Felhandler of Los Angeles.  George Markham, trainer, was suspended. Revelation of the dope was made by Dr. C. H. McKim, who reported findings of a saliva test. Silva, who won a race here January 7. was suspended from further races, as were Lapland and Sir Rose, other horses trained by Markham.  The saliva tests are made on horses here by lot. This is the first case where an alkaloid reaction, indicating dope, has been found.  At the same time officials admitted that despite their vigorous efforts against it, spot news of odds, scratches and results were being relayed from the track to outside betting agencies.  Two theories as to how this is being done were advanced. Some believe the gamblers have posted a lookout with a spy glass atop a tree near the course. Others claim the news is relayed by a short wave radio from the fence.  Route Would Run Between Sierra Madre and El Monte Through Arcadia; Time, Distance To Eastern Valley Cities Due To Be Cut Down With line’s Establishment  SHUTTLE TO TRACK FROM ARCADIA DEPOT IS PROPOSED  Major Elmer Swanton Named Chairman Of Commerce Committee To Sponsor This Improved Transportation;  P. E. Traffic Superintendent To Be Contacted  Initial action on the establishment of a Pacific Electric bus line from Sierra Madre to El Monte, via Arcadia, the prime motive of which is to cut time down on trips taken by residents of this area to eastern southland communities, was taken this weejc by the Arcadia Chamber of Commerce, it was announc/^l today by Major Elmer E. E. Swanton, chairman of the committee  furthering this move.  The proposed line would be ap-^ proxlmately 8 miles In length, with several stops planned enroute.  Swanton disclosed today.  “At the present time. Sierra 'Madre, Arcadia, Monrovia,, Glendora. or Azusa residents desiring to reach eastern southland cities such as Pomona, Riverside. San Bernardino and others In the Orange Belt must travel by Pacific Electric car into valley junction, then transfer to the eastbound cars,’* Swanton explained. “This route, it is readily seen, would whack off a good chuck of mileage and cut down time on such trips.”  According to plans, the contem-  i iKEIiS  Mil  Two Los Angeles Men Nabbed By Pinkerton Patrol; Fined $75.00 In Court  Corailed by Sergeant Inlow and Officers Jones and Crozier of the Pinkerton patrol, Phil Cablbl and plated route would start from the Bernard Cohen of Los Angeles yes-  Foothill Communities Requested To Recommend Modification Of Building Code  Seeking the backing of every foothill community in the southland, i the Conservation Association of Los  Her experiences while travelling ¡ Angeles County today, by letter, re-were a riot of laughter as she re- ¡ quested the city of Arcadia to for-cited them. Time after time she ward a note to the Board of Superfound herself in a position where visors asking for favorable action only the most brazen intestinal for- on the proposed modifica:ions of the tltude would find a way out, but building code in fare areas, she arrived in Hollywood in her al- I Signed by W. S. Rosecrans, presi-loted two years and according to dent, the letter said in part:  the terms of the wager.  “The disastrous fires oí the sea-  Miss Joy is a newspaper woman son Just past have again focused by profession and was in the employ Public attention upon the need for of a large Boston paper at the ' care with fire in our mountains and time of her venture. She has had i    Particularly is caie im-  several scenarios accepted and her portant ^in foothill areas that have writings are syndicated throughout    developed for lesi-  the press of the eastern seaboard. dential purposes. Many of the  ... 4 oi    r»». homes already built have little or  AS a speciftl musical treat Dr.    ^  Pacific Electric depot in Sierra Madre. go east on Central to Santa Anita avenue, thence south to Colorado boulevard, over Colorado boulevard to First avenue to the local P. E. station. After leaving off passengers desiring to go to Monrovia, Azusa, or Glendora, and picking up others traveling on, the bus continue on down First avenue to Huntington drive, east on Huntington drive to Second, thence south on Second into El Monte. Another stop might be arranged at the Azusa road intersection so that residents in this area, including those residing in the Federal Homestead tract could be taken to their destination.  A shuttle car might be put into service at the Arcadia depot to run over to the track during the racing season here.  terday were arrested for operating a “book” at the track.  The men were arraigned at 6 p. m. yesterday before Judge Ardene Boiler, pleaded guilty, and were fined $100 or 50 days, with $25 and 12 days whacked off providing the gamblers stayed out of the city of Arcadia for a year. They chose the latter.  Cabibi gave his home address as 428 North Alfred street, Los Angeles, and Cohen, 6135 Cajshion street, Los Angeles.  Jl I LmIm ai  Pictures On Electricity To Be Given  E. E. Westerhouse Hopes For Big Poll On Possible School Building Proposal  Requesting that Arcadians who received the “post-card ballots” on will be presented Thursday night, the question of the sale of the re-  The great part that electricity has p’ayed in the rapid development of affairs will be the subject of the motion pictures and lecture which  nf Rlprrii Madre saner tWO t    ^ t.    yvui oe    ximiouajr    viic otiic w* wiv, AW  dellEhtful solos: “The Hills of    protection from fire and . January 23, at 7:30, in the audito- maming school bonds in amount of  delightful Home’ *and “The Builder.** Dr. Peterson was the guest of Dr. Heiden-relch, who was the chairman for the day. The usual number of out-ofstate visitors were present.  January 24th—Men’s Fellowship dinner-meeting at Community Church. Dr. Stewart McLennan, speaker.  • ♦ ♦  Saturday. January 25th—Public dance at American Legion hall, Don Williams* orchestra.  9 ^ m  Baseball  Sunday, January 19 — Arcadia Merchants vs. Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. at city park diamond, Second avenue at Hunimgton drive. Doube-header, first game starting at 1:15 p. m.  . ♦ * *  Arcadia Theatre Opens tonight, for three days-  there! ore, a menace not only to themselves and neighbors but, what is often mo:e important, to valuable  (Continued on Page 4)  ium of the high school.  $10.000 for the furthering of the  PARADE  lUi * ‘    V  Marx Brothers in ANight At The Opera'* also Kay Francis in “I Pound Stella Parrish.**  COPY w  Hoover, radio pugilist,  Drives a heavy handed fist Into New Deal prlmadonnas.  Saying tha: 11 we are gonners, Blessed are the young, they get Job of paying Public Debt.  Literary Digest poll  Puts the New Deal in the hole;  So it seems upon the surlace.  But some doubt its serious purpose. Joe E. Browns* elastic pan Is so mobile U can*t tan,  There*s a blast when he says wow; Pan is copyrighted now.  Printer's Ink consumed by tons In the news edition ruas As the Governor of New Jersey Extends Hauptmann one month's mercy.  Senate has a Bonus wrangle.  Shoots at it from every angle So what 11    R. M. ORR.  Many interesting iacts, not tech-    school building program return  nlcal but easily comprehended, will    them as soon as possible, E. E. Wesr be shown and explained, proving terhouse, superintendent of city  that in the present age. most every    schools, today hoped for a large  phase of life is more or less depen-    “poll"  dent upon this great power.  The ballots were sent out through  H. B. Tubbs of Los Angeles is pre- the mails Thursday afternoon and paring this Interesting event in the shou.d be in the homes of those to regular series of Thursday night 11- whom They wert' sent by today, lustrated lectures on general Interest.  eral contribution of fiet^ labor on  subjects of With $10.000 in bonds yet uns old, * the saving resulting from the Fed-  Arcadian's Car Stolen, Report  J the First Avenue rec^mst rue tion  Monrovia Department  j project, there is now a chance to enlarge the Holly avenue  A car registered to Marie Hayes ‘ and kindergarten. Under the WPA, of 814 Arcadia avenue. Arcadia, was the federal grant would    o  lepoited stolen in Monrovia last approximately four times the night    j amount put up bv !• district  The Monrovia police djpax’tment meaning that th* Arcadia areas informed the Aicadia station of the cjuld get a $5U,0üü impi«^*ement theft. It was taken from Its park- j¡^x the pre^fni time, the .rowded ing space at the corner of Palm and conduion at the Holly avenue Ivy avenues    school, especially in the kindergar  ten. *:> of an a'armlng natur« The original plans for this school building still provide for addUioiis tna Board of Trustees has pioposec a two-classroom exitri Aon to tne 4.40 2.60 southeast wxng will* a full basement underneath adequate for school assemblies, meetings, and the liKe^  Todays Results  Murph Pascha Cora Mine  FIRST RACE 7.20  4.20 ZSO  SECOND RACE  Lady Florlse 4.«>    3.20 2.80 additional flxtuio!. in the piesent  Deer Fly    3.40 2.80    tojjet rooms, and a sepaiv*«t Icludcrr  Squeezer    3.00    g^rten unit.   

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