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Arcadia Daily Tribune: Friday, January 17, 1936 - Page 1

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   Arcadia Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - January 17, 1936, Arcadia, California                                 %  • •* «*. ai  ArtmdWM Hwnm  M9WMpap9r ..  t:he ar c^a'^dia  ii lU  V HOfll« ffM9«fMip«r  ALL THE HOME NEWS ALL THE TIME  Pilone 21 Jl  DEVOTED TO THE PROCRÉÉS A HD PROSPCRITY OF ARCADiA  TBIBUNE WANT ADS GET RESULTI  Pfiofie 21 Jl  Vol. I ffo. 16  ArcadlOf California, Friday, January 17,1936  Single Copy 5c  CHAMBER OF COMMERCE DIRECTORS IN DWNER MEETING  -i  -'S     1    1                p          J.    J.    J            b         APPROVES PLANS nnnnriir t  NGA  [ EUCtS  Beautificiation Of! Santa Fe Depot Discussed I At Dinner Session Night  PRESIDENT DAMELS IS HOST  As guests of President A. L. Daniels, incoming: and outiroinp membeni of the Arcadia Chamber of Commerce, last night met for a dinner-meeting at the Three Deuces Cafe, From left to right: A1 Muler, Charles J. Beery, Robert Touehon, C, A, Hasson, Everett Watt, G. G. Meade, Daniels, Major Elmer E* E. Swaston, Harold Mosher, and Keith Beanston.    (RoushPhoto)  Los Angeles Speaker Brings Interesting Message; Siemens Appointed Director  Benefits the Townsend Plan will bring to the youth of America was stressed in a message delivered last night by J. L. Morrow at the weekly meeting of the Arcadia Townsen-dites held in the auditorium of the city hall.  Morrow Is from the Los Angeles ofiioes of the Townsend organization.  Hal P. filemons of Arcadia, who Just recently returned from the State of Washington, gave the local club members a talk on Townsend conditions in the Northwest. Siemens was called back to Los An-gelefi to be informed that he had been appointed National Regional Director of the western states and two territories.    i  Tomorrow atternoon, the chartered Townsend Clubs of the 12th Congressional District will send representatives to Baldwin Park for a convention. Miss Emma Orr, secretary of the local club, was named delegate from Arcadia with President J. L. Marks as alternate.  with the nationally-known Hulbert’s Fruit Products, Inc., when this organization’s office was located on ‘Huntington drive, will be in charge of the newly-established Los Angeles office of this concern at 1102 Van Nuys 'building, it was announced today.  Wright, who made many friends in this city when he was stationed here, has been shitted from the New York office in the Chryslar building, the announcement disclosed. Hulbert's Fruit Products  HULBERT FRVMT PRODUCTS, INC.,  MOVE OFFtCES FROM NEW YORK TO VAN NUYS BViLDING IN LOS ANGELES  E. D. Wright, former accountant ? will maintain only a small office  and sales force in New York, with the Los Angeles headquarters becoming the key terminal of this unit.    ,  The Arcadia office at St. Joseph and Santa Anita will be a plant office only. R. B. (Bob) Hulbert will remain as plant superintendent.  Raymond Brooks, president of Hulbert*s Fruit Products, Inc., is scheduled to come to Los Angeles in the near future for a general survey and to make arrangements for the coming p‘ack.  Law Prohibits Time Extension On Auto Fees  SACRAMENTO, Jan. 17.—Fact, not threat, today was bringing California motorists to realization they must obtain 1936 registration number plates prior to midnight January 30 or pay 100 percent penalty on vehicle license fees.  “This is the first registration renewal period in which the state Is operating under a vehicle code that definitely sets a time limit for collecting fees/’ explained Ray Ingels, director of motor vehicles, in warning motorists there can be no extension of time for obtaining plates without payment of double fees.  Ali California Highway Patrol offices are registering vehicles to augment service of department oi motor veliicles offices and automobile clubs, and Ingels has ordered each office to remain open open until 5 p, ni. Saturdays during renewal period.  NEW YORK, Jan. 17. (INS)—A break in silver stocks unsettled the stock market today. U. S. Smelting and Cerro de Pasco dropped over a point each. Sliver King coalition was fractionally lower.  In most other sock groups, price flucuaions wer lemsaland hrdlu un fluctuations were small and there were a handful of active features on the up side.  President Roosevelt*s plans to revive AAA measures under the guise of a program to prevent soil erosion lifted cotton 50 cents a bale but apparently had little effect on the stock market. Gains werq fractionally liigher.  RKO, International Nickel and Schenley were among the few bright spots, The lirst two advanced into new high ground for J935-36 while  the distilling issue rose over a point Naval parley hits the rocks on reports earnmgs for 1935 would * steered by foreign fighting cocks show $8.25 a share against |6.63 in bewhiskered Russian Bear,  El  Slogans, New Sigis Planned By Directors; Watt Selected Committed Head  - - -  Discussing several items of major \ importance, directors of the Arcadia Chamber of Commerce, Incoming and outgoing, last night met lor a dinner-meeting at the Three Deuces Cafe on Huntington drive, with President A. L. Daniels, host for the dinner, presiding.  The directors detided to contact Santa Fe Railway officials immediately concerning the beautification of the land on either side of the present historic depot. Some time ago, C. G. Fluhr and F. J. Mackie, Santa Fe moguls, visited Arcadia for a hurried inspection of the land with the thought in mind of developing a park here.  Everett Watt was named chairman of a committee to look into the proposed plan of enlarging and replacing present Chamber of Commerce signs^ln 'Att»dia. In addition to the one at Holly avenue and Huntington and the one posted on Huntington east of the “Y” intersection at the corner tip of Ro6S field, the directors plan for a sign at the western cl^y limits on Colorado boulevard.  Slogans will also be conceived and hung under these signs, it was decided.  __A house-to-house coverage of the  Ml. D 1 11 M 4 * Chamber of Commerce rosters will Monte Basketoallers Meet soon get underway. At the present  Locals In First Loop '  Battle Tonight  CHILD’S MYSTERY WOUND  PALL BIVEB. (INS)—Eight-year-  old William Turcotte complained of a pain In his leg when he returned home from pJay. Doctors removed a two and one-half inch piece of pencil lead from his thigh aftsr an X-ray. Neither William or any of his playmates could tell how the lead athlete star, but Coach Gene Mc-  El Monte and Monrovia-Arcadia-Duarte high schools will open the San Gabriel Valley League basketball season of 1936 tonight in the Ivy avenue school gym in Monrovia.  The varsity game tossup is slated | for 8 p. m„ with a lightweight preliminary starting at 7 o’clock.  Rated with Excelsior as the “team to beat^' in the valley loop this winter, the Lions from down El Monte way are top favorites to defeat the Wildcats tonight. The local quintet, composed of four of last year's cracker-Jack aggregation, Just cannot seem to click, and have lost three out of four practice skirmishes already this year.  All the boys from the 1935 machine are back in harness except Johnnie Lindell, Arcadia all-around  (Continued on Page 4)     IF'        IPPR      lu    J  ■p    Hi r  PñT      wß m    .u    r ull  Rinnn              iRO     fvsnm  President Roosevelt, who yesterday gave his. approval to the development of Ross Field into a county park and playground.  Bed-Clothes, Linen Included In “HauF' Taken From Home (K James Maclnnis  Gaining entrance through a rear window, burglars last Wednesday night broke into the home of James F. Maclnnes, local postman, at 232 Laurel avenue, for a general ransacking.  It was the fourth burglary in three weeks time here.  The back bedroom, linen closet, and kitchen were thoroughly “picked” by the burglars, who failed  (Continued on Paire 4)  WORLD WIDE NEWS FLASHES  Front international News Service  became lodged In his leg.  / / /.' /  PARADE  PHPVRiUhi    C..V.RZCHAIC  1034.  Profit-taking followed formal announcement of Bethlehem Steel's_____________  plan to absorb 4 units and refund its | presidential candidate back preferred dividends through a    Arcadia, here oi late.  On the ground and in the air, Has a round one million three Hundred thousand soldiery.  new stock issue.  \yjlille alcohols and rail equlp-  Promlses a monthly sum To all over twenty one;  ments were generally higher, other j^gj-e five hundred dollar pension, groups were mixed or lower. Some Hardly high enough to mention, of the Utilities displayed a firmer Queer fish bred In row of tanks, tone but price changes were con- ‘ showing nature's curious pranks, fined to small fractions.    ! Guppies, angel-flsh galore—  I  Question is, why breed some more  Ì  NEW YORK, Jan. 17. (INS)— ^ivhen the country^s full of fish Markets at a glance;    j which look queer on any dish.  Stocks-^Mixed.    1 SERA big shot guys  Curb—Irregularly higher.    Get a handsome salary rise.  Bonds—go ^hat I J    K. M* ORR,  Allister cannot locate anyone on the campus who can fill the sharp-shooting Llndeirs place.  Handicapped by the football playoffs which carried them to the Southern California prep finals, the Green-and-White five were late getting underway in the casaba sport, but, even so, the Cat^ should be working smoother in order to get far in the league tussles.  McAllister this morning picked the following boys to start tonight's fracas: Bob (Bullet) Coleman and Prank Spratt, forwards; Dick Merchant, center; A1 Flannes and Ernie Hayes, guards.  WILL ENACT LAW OVER VETO  WASHINGTON, Jan. 17. (INS)—The compromise “Baby Bonds" Bonus Bill, paying off the adjusted service certificates of 3,519,191 World War veterans, will be enacted into law over a Presidential veto, Senator Pat Harrison <D) of Mississippi told the Senate this afternoon in opening debate on the measure.  Harrison pleaded with his colleagues to dispose of the bill promptly so as to take the bonus issue out of politics.  Wire From Hoeppel Reveals President's Signature Affixed To Project Transforming Old Balloon School Into County Playground and Recreational Center  FINAL APPROVAL EXPECTED WITHIN WEEK, IS REPORT  Comptoller-General Next Station For Outline Of Development Of 185-Acres Here; Anticipate Actual Work On Lands-scaping To Be Underway Early In February  Ross Field’s transformation into a county park was proc-tically assured late yesterday when President Roosevelt approved the plans and specifications for the project.  A telegram flashed here from Washington from Congressman John H. Hoeppel revealed this information.  The wire further stated that the project, along with a number of others, now will go to the comptroller-general for final approval which Is expected within a week.  Optimistic iollowers of the project's route from the Los Angeles office to Washington, vio San Francisco, firmly believe that the actual work on the landscaping of the old balloon school will get underway early in February at the latest. Under plans first announced the initial action to be taken on the 185-acres will be the general landscaping.  From all Indications, the plans and specifications as submitted by the engineers in James K. Reid's office in Los Angeles have been approved without any change whatsoever.  Reid, superintendent of county parks and playgrounds,*had his designers work out a drawing which was shown to a group of San Gabriel Valley civic leaders and newspapermen several months ago, and it is this drawing, with minor changes, which was sent on to Washington.  This sketch, as designed by Ralph Brooks and Bill Treadwell of Monrovia, displayed the park as .including an 18-hole golf course, swimming pool, tennis courts, baseball diamond, playground area, picnic grounds, drives and walks, and buildings needed on any recreational center such as is planned ior Ross Field.  COL. KNOX CHARGES ADMINISTRATION  LANSING, Mich., Jan. 17. (INS)-~Oharging the Administration has started a *’smearlng campaign against the once-frlendly press of the nation because it turned critical of his policies, Col. Prank Knox, Chicago newspaper publisher and Republican Presidential aspirant, today ended his 3-day visit to Michigan after leaving the warning "Democracy dies where the press is not free."  Postpone Cásese in Local Co^irt Today  GOVERNOR FOLLOWED CONSCIENCE  TRENTON, N. J., Jan. 17. (INS)—Oovernor Harold G. Hoffman declared this afternoon he followed the dictates of his conscience in granting a thirty-day reprieve to Bruno Richard Hauptmann and that, if impeachment is to be the price for daring to do this, he Is “ready to pay it."  BABY LpST BIRTHRIGHT  NEW YORK (INS)—All her life  BVRD PLEASED WITH FINDING OF ELLSWORTH  PORTLAND, Ore., Jan. 17. (INS)—**That is real news. It's great. I’m tickled to death."  That was the way Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd expressed his satisfaction today at news from London that Lincoln Ellsworth. American explorer, and his companion, Hei'bert Hollick-Kenyon, had been found at Little America. Admiral Byrd’s old station in the frigid south.  ••I had a hunch Ellsworth would be found at Little America, His flight is the greatest ever accomplished over the Antarctic.  KIPLING LAPSES INTO COMA  LONDON, Jan. 17. (INS)—Rudyard Kipling lapsed into a coma today, and his doctors resorted hastily to blood transfusions, artlficiaj supplying of oxygen, and -saline iniuslons to save his life.  ERNIE NEVERS TO COACH LAFAYETTE  STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Cal., Jan. 17. (INS)—Ernie Nevers, of Mrs. Kathei'ine Thraves Maxw*¿11, Stanford’s athletic hall of fame, and Indian backfleld coach for the wanted to have her first baby born past three years, has been nanitJ híad iootball coach at Lafayette Colin Virginia. But just before the lege, in Eston, Pa., and will begin his new duties early in March, ac-child was born, she swore in court cording to word received here today, here, her husband forced her to leave Virginia and come to Manhattan. For that reason she asked Su-pi’eme Court Justice Philip J. Mc-Cook to grant her a separation from George L. Maxwell, member of the York Stock Exchange.  OLD RESIDENT DIES  SAN GABRIEL, Cal., Jan. 17. (INS)—San Gabriel’s oldest inhabitant, the man who retained vivid memories of early days In Calliornia, Francisco Rangel, 95, was dead today  Born in IWO at the Santa Gerti'us Rancho near Los Nietos and baptized at San Gabriel, Don Francisco died yesterday«  Postponement was the order of the court today.  Tiie dog kennel case of Miss Louise Vinsonlialer, 1602 South Baldwin avenue, was postponed until a week from today, as was the Yellow Cab Taxi Service case Irom Los Angeles.  Miss Vinfconlialer was to be arraigned for hearing on the violation of Ordinance No. Zìi, while tiie taxi company was to be heard on its opemting a service in and out of Santa Anita Park witliout a license.  January 24th—^Men's Fellowship dinner-meeting at Community Church. Dr. Stewart McLennan, speaker.  • ♦ •  Saturday. January 25th—Public dance at American Legion hall, Don Williams' orchestra.  • » «  Baseball  Sunday, January 19 — Arcadia Merchants vs. Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. at city park diamond, Second avenue at Huntington drive. Doube-header, fii^t game starting at 1:15 p. m.  * ♦ •  Arcadia Theatre  Closes tonight — "Hands Across The Table** also *‘So Red The Rose.*'  House-To-House Canvass Now In Progress in 13 Precincts In Arcadia  With all registrations prior to January 1 nuQ and void, Arcadia voters today were urged to be sure and be reregistered during the house-to-house canvass in all 13 precincts which is now being staged.  Due to the Increase in population of this city, three precincts were added to the ten customary ones of the past, City Clerk Harry Nesbitt announced today. In tomorrow's Daily Tribune, the new boundary lines will be givftn for all precincts.  Following is the list of workers and their respective addresses In the field now for reregistration purposes:  Precinct No. 1—Nellie G. Scrader, 45 Colorado boulevard.  Precinct No. 2—Cicely L, Mann, 38 Bonita street.  Precinct No. 3—^Irene E. Kastwood, 130 El Dorado street.  Precinct No. 4—Roxy P. Wilson, 1121 South Second avenue.  Precinct No. 5—Ellen M. Norris, 127 B. Valnett avenue.  Precinct No. 6—Maude A. Fox, 2112 South Sixth avenue.  Precinct No. 7—Louis P. Strut-zenberg, 1802 South Santa Anita avenue.  Precinct *No. 8—Mrs Lillian E. Hulbert, 1705 South Santa Anita avenue.  Precinct No. 9—Nell M. Shelton, 456 Lemon avenue.  Precinct No. 10—Adele L. Cousins. 536 Lemon avenue.  Precinct No. 11—Walter M. Cornish. 447 Palrview avenue.  Precinct No. 12—Bertha C. Klr-ther, 1117 Golden West avenue.  Precinct No. 13—Stella E. Brook-over, 650 West Huntington drive.  LADIES’ DAY AT ROTARV  Today was ladles' day at the Arcadia Rotary Club noon meeting at Ye Derby Tavern.  President Jack Tester presided, while Dr William Heldenreich was program chairman of the day.  OUTSMAKTEd' COl’RT  KEENE, N. H. (INS)—Arrested on a charge of drunkenness, a local resident told the court he did not want to lose any time from his work and, pleaded guilty and authorized the clerk of court to notify the mill where he was employed to take three dollars fine out of his pay. At the mill the clerk was Informed the man had drawn his wages and left the Job.  Today*s Results  FIRST RACE CARDINALIS    5,5iO 300 2.80  Ready Teddy    3.60  Tarpwood  SECOND RAC E The Flower Gulden Crystal Red Go  320  3.00  3.H0  4.M  A  -    a..   

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