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Arcadia Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 13, 1936 - Page 1

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Publication: Arcadia Daily Tribune

Location: Arcadia, California

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   Arcadia Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - January 13, 1936, Arcadia, California                                 — r  J  ‘-XT'  jfi ^11  Ä,  r-# ..‘♦★i •“    -• •*    Qi • « * * r* «*4¡5*W •    *  •■mu« »'MM't —^yjHftyiftMy«*a.fj    *i»'v335'-iX*f.-Ji*C  .1 ««tC8ifS&* * **' ’*' *»v»r "T  -3,  4»  .</. •  ?• .» j£ >Vr »V*»*»*™»«»»  • H; »».fc  . '-I  ^ < »4 ;■ • 1» 4 .  '•■-«>    .««««•    y-y»-«  * .    -t#- »'’a    — ^ >^y*ìj£■ 4>iv£- -    X Î^iî* *<->  J * «-*** « »•»•»-* H*»-    •> «r - • • '» •«■.twtn    •<-<■ V*,  •’ * •'i/o.-í-- i kt . v^.*.«; <**    V *.»    -    . «    . »'  if«  A  <  - T*  Arcadia*» Horna Nmtpapffp .  ALL THE HOME NEWS ALL THE TIME  Phone 2131  THE ARCADIA  Arcadia*» Home  Newspaper  DEVOTED TO THE PROGRESS A ND PROSPERITY OF ARCADIA  TRIBUNE WANT ADS GET RESULTS  Phone 2131  Vol. I, No. 12  Arcadia, California, Monday, January IJ, 1936  Single Copy §c  My Hat's In The Ring’ • Lyon  SEEK TO UNITE  Coanander  Here Is an action-photo of W. Parker Lyon, Arcadia candidate for President of the United States, tossing his 10-gallon hat in the ring. v     (Roush Photo)  — ii  “ANOTHER LINCOLN NEEDED IN  THE WHITE HOUSE," LYON SAYS  AS CAMPAIGN GETS UNDERWAY  Adopting the slogan . . .  44 We needfreJic-hunter has stressed the point  another Lincoln in the White House” . . . W. Parker Lyon, owner and manager of the Pony Express museum, today named his museum foreman, Abe Lincoln, as his running mate in the national Presidential campaign.  “Yessir,” Lyon declared in making this announcement,  4 ‘this country needs another Lincoln in the White House, and Abe, a kin of President Lincoln, is the man for the job.”  In discussing his candidacy, Lyon said:  “I am truly sorry that a great number of people have stamped by intention to run for President as a publicity stunt. All the way through I have been serious about the matter, and the deluge of mail that has poured in from various points indicate to me that there are lots of people interested in my decision.”  The keynote of Lyon's platform is to “make the world a better place to live in,” and to gain this end, the  of making everyone rich. He has. advocated a pension of $500 peri month for everyone over 21 years of'  age.  Col, Ernest A. Wiltsee, vice-president of the California Historical Society, from his headquarters in San j Francisco, has overseered the inauguration of Lyon’s campaign, which is to get underway immediately. Already steps have been taken in planning Lyon's personal j appearance tours.  Death Valley Scotty, life-long friend of the millionaire hobbyist, has been appointed to Lyon's campaign staff, the latter naming his hermit-pal to cover the Mohave Desert territory.  Lyon, one-time mayor of Fresno, has several times turned down bids to run for the governorship of the State of California. The route of his personal appearance trek will be ready for public announcement  within th enext few days.  Bonus Advocates Hope Roosevelt Will Accept Compromise  WASHINGTON, Jan. 12. (INS)— Bonus advocates in and out of Congress hopefully turned to President Roosevelt’s own words today as they  I  Stock Market Res uw  NEW YORK, Jan. 13. (INS)—  Solid Backing Sought In Valley For Speedy Action On Ross Field Improvement  ROTARIANS T0~BACK MOVE  Plan For Confab With McLaughlin Some Time Next Week Over Project  Taking the first steps in uniting the San Gabriel Valley solidly behind the immediate action needed to start the development of Ross Field into a county park and recreational center, Gordon Eberly and P. M. Martindale today represented the Arcadia Rotary Club at the Azusa Rotary session this noon.  Neal Van Sooy, publisher of he Azusa Herald and president of the valley unit of the California Newspaper Publishers’ Association, an Azusa Rotarian, and Martindale were scheduled to get the “ball rolling” on the campaign.  Van Sooy announced today that he is negotiating for a committee of valley newspapermen to meet with E. J. McLaughlin, State WPA Director, sometime next week. McLaughlin is due in Southern California shortly, and the confab is being arranged during his visit in the southland.  This matter was discussed by several local Rotarians at the roundtable meeting held at the home of the Arcadia Club president, Jack Tester, last Thursday night. It is the object of this campaign to get  A. E. (Earl) Morris, commander of the Arcadia Post of the VFW, who tonight will have charge of the Initiation ceremonies for five  new members.  Loses $70 At Park, But Not By Tabbing Wrong Nag  Sometime between the seventh and eighth races on Saturday’s card at Santa Anita Park, John II. Pcschke of Los Angeles lost $70 in cash, and it was not because he picked the wrong horse, either.  According to a report filed with the local police department, the Los Angeles man had his wallet “lifted” from his hip-pocket. In addition to the “seventy bucks,” many valuable keepsakes were in the wallet, the report revealed.  BE STAGED GÏ  LEGION MEETS TOMORROW  Members of the Glenn Dyer Post all valley Rotary Clubs and other \ No. 247, American Legion, will meet  service organizations behind the I tomorrow night in the Legion hall project, as well as the solid backing [ for a regular session, of the various newspapers, daily and Commander Art Nelson will call weekly, in the San Gabriel Valley. the meeting to order at 8 p. m.  WORLD WIDE NEWS FLASHES  From Internationat News Service  sought some assurance the Chief j Executive would accept the compro-  stock  Prices held generally in a nar-mise “baby bond” methods of pay-  row ran £e today while traders ment about to be offered in the i  awaIted  possibly far-Teaching Su-Senate.    preme Court decisions at Washing-  Advised informally by Secretary  ton * Utilities ranged fractionally of the Treasury Morgenthau that  the President had not changed his  Alr  Reduction dropped six points  mind about bonus payment, those  while DuPont gained more than a  backing the measure found some , point. Union Carbide was up frac-comfort in Mr. Roosevelt's message  1  tionally while Western Union, Wes-of last May vetoing the Patman tinghouse and Allied Chemical Bill which would have paid adjusted showed fractional losses, service certificates in new currency. | Wilson & Co. Packing Shares and In that veto, which was sustained RKO were among the more active by the narrow margin of nine votes ’ issues with Wilson up  l A. Motors in the Senate, the President primar- weer soft and rails mixed,  INTRODUCE COMPROMISE BONUS BILL  WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. (INS)—An Administration Compromise Bonus Bill proposing to give America’s World War Veterans two billion dollars in Government “Baby Bonds” immediately redeemable in exchange for their adjusted service certificates was introduced in the Senate today.  The Bill was reported to have President Roosevelt’s approval. It was sponsored by Senator Pat Harrison (D) of Mississippi, Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee. He announced that Senators Byrns, (D) South Carolina, Clark (D) Missouri, and Steimer (R) Oregon, were coauthors of it.  “In my opinion,” said Harrison, “this bill will be enacted into law/’  CAUSE OF DEPRESSION GIVEN  WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. (INS)—The business and industrial boom of Pre-War America, when International bankers such as J. P. Morgan were floating tremendous loans in this country for the Allies, was directly blamed for the post-war depression today as the Senate Munition** Committee resumed hearings.  ily objected to “the deceptively easy method of payment” afforded by turning on the printing presses. He added that failure of Congress to provide additional taxes for pay-. ment alone would have been suffi- j Markets at a glance.  Cotton dropped 75 cents a bale, while May delivery of wheat was lower.  NEW YORK, Jan. 13. (INS)—  Stocks—Mixed.  Curb—3tocks irregularly higher. Bonds—Irregular.  Call Money—% per cent.  Cotton—Futures off 4 to 7 points. Chicago Wheat — Fractionally  cient to warrant disapproval and asserted that in depressions all able bodied citizens should be treated on a parity without preference to any special group.  The President did concede the credit of the United Stales was so  lower * safe that payment of the bonus    --—  would not bankrupt the country. In Today 9 » Resuit»  his budget message last week, he repeated the general statement about  soundness of national credit.    ] Proud Indian    17.20 QM  *.00  FIRST RACE I Proud Indian    17.20  I Bournemouth Shasta Boy  SECOND RACE  1121 6.20 4.40  1.00  S¿0  «.40  FORMER OPERA STAR KILLS SELF LOS ANGELES, Jan. 13. (INS)—Mrs. Malita Powell Rovig, 50, former Metropolitan Grand Opera singer, early today shot and perhaps fatally wounded her husband, Charles Rovig, 53, and then turned the gun on herself with fatal results.  The shooting took place in thsir fashionable apartment following a quarrel.  BULLETS RING IN CHINATOWN  LOS ANGELES, Jan. 13. (INS>—An outburst of gangland guns in Old Chinatown here today had taken the life of a Filipino, shot by mistake «by ruffians attempting to murder another man.  The shooting, according to police, grew out of a poolroom argument between Pedro Garong and some other Filipinos. In the darkened alley, Garong escaped with flesh wounds, while Seratio Ablog, a bystander, was fatally shot.  RETURNS FROM HOSPITAL  Dave Anderson, adjutant of the Tubac    13.24 6.20 1.00  local American Legion Post, last Trystland    4.40 440  Thursday returned to Arcadia after    Pretty Russell  a sojourn of four months in the Vet-     (     THIRD RACK  erans’ Hospital in Ban Fernando.    Loafer    102.40 41.20 *1 JO  He now at his home, 010 South    Coya    0.40 7.00  gscond,    Little Stein    MM  KIPLING, 70-YEAR-GLD POET, ILL LONDON, Jan. 13. (INS)—Rudyard Kipling, famous poet of the Indian Barrack Room, was taken suddenly ill during the night and underwent an emergency operation at Middlesex Hospital here for “some form of gastric trouble.”  Kipling observed his 70th birthday December 30.  ORDER RECORD VOTE  WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. (INS;—On a standing vote of 47 to 37, the House today discharged its Ways and Means Committee from further consideration of the Patman Bill directing payment of the soldiers’ bonus through a $2.000,000,000 “greenback” inflation issue. A record vote was ordered immediately.  “ROXY” CALLED BV DEATH  NOW YORK, Jan. 13. (INS)—Deaih today rang down the curtain for “Roxy,” successor to the glittering mantle of the great Ziegfeld.  As sudden as the climax of one of his lavish stage presentations, heart disease claimed him in his Fifth Avenue Hotel apartment.  Samuel L. Rothaiel, whose real name was almost forgotten behind the nickname that became a synonym for spectacular entertainment, was the forerunner of a stage technique that has become an American institution*  Patterson, Stewart, Pelligrino DeBeers, Kloety To Be Added To Roll  MORRIS IN CHARGE OF RITES  Three Deuces Cafe Is Scene Of Arcadia Post Session;  Attendance Urged  With Commander A. E. (Earl) Morris in charge of the ceremonies, five Arcadians will be given the short-form initiation into the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States tonight when the Arcadia Post meets at the Three Deuces Cafe on Huntington drive.  The quintet to be initiated tonight are: Cyril Kloety, Charles Stewart, Steve Pelligrino, William DeBeers, and W. M. Patterson. They were voted into membership at the December 30th session of the local post.  The above-named comprise the , first class to be initiated in the Post since the nation-wide membership drive was inaugurated a short time ago.  Several important items of business are to be discussed by the Post tonight, according to Morris, who, this morning, urged a full attendance.  Complete Result»  Of Poultry Show Award» Out Thurs.  Complete results of the Pan-Pacific Poultry Exposition now In progress at the Pan-Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles will be published In the Daily Tribune on Thursday of this week. The results will also be found in this week’s weekly edition of the Tribune.  Many Arcadians are listed among tbe prize winners, a survey of the complete list of awards revealed today.  SCHOOL ROLLS  Distribution Of Funds In Surplus Pool Distributed To Agreement Signers  Of interest to Arcadia walnut growers is the announcement made today that a final distribution of funds in the surplus pool operated under the 1934-35 Walnut Agreement and License has been authorized by the trustees for that agreement, and the sum of $332.260.31 has just been distributed to signatories and licensees as a liquidating payment. This announcement was made by W. E. Goodspeed, manager for the agreement.  According to the records of the Control Board, this pool operated from September 1, 1934 to January 10, 1936, during which time 224,167 one hundred-pound bags of merchantable walnuts were received either by deposit of walnuts or by purchase from cash received from signatories and licensees in lieu of waliuts. These walnuts have all been sold either in export trade, for shelling, or for charitable institutions. After deduction of all administrative expense, they have realized an average net price of $7.6175 per  (Continued on Page 2)  Seventy-Seven Added To Arcadia Schools Since Start Of Year In September  Showing an increase of 77 pupils since September, the Arcadia elementary schools are now filled to their capacity, it was disclosed today by E. E. Westerhouse, superintendent.  The enrollment taken in September was 762, and the roll of last Friday hit the 839 mark.  “This increase has been mounting steadily through the first semester,” Westerhouse said. “It is not the aftermath of the opening of the racing season here, although two or three students have been added since Christmas Day. I would state that the growth of the city of Arcadia is being reflected in our attendance charts.”  Requests from parents to transfer their children from Monrovia schools to the local institutions, received here recently, had to be turned down because of the full enrollment recorded in Arcadia schools. Westerhouse reported this morning that close to 25 Monrovians have been seeking to enroll their children here.  At the present time there are several Monrovia children in the Arcadia schools, and about as many local students in Monrovia schools. Children living right on the bouno-ary lines <between the two communities have always attended the .schools closest to their home. Up on Valencia way, Arcadians attend the Mayflower avenue school in Monrovia, while Monrovians residing on the Fifth avenue line are enrolled at First avenue.  men in list  FOR BUILDING  Listed In Twenty-First Position Among Southern California Cities, Report Shows  SOUTH'S BOOM REVEALED  New Residence Comprises Bulk Of Queen Gty’s Construction During 1935  Arcadia's record-breaking 1935 building permit total placed this city 21st in the list of Southern California communities for the past year, it was revealed yesterday *in a report filed by building inspectors in Los Angeles.  The Queen Ciy also placed 21st on the month of December list.  Southern California construction activity for 1935 totaled $74,653,111.00 as compared with the ’34 sum of $34,492,498.00. This total does not include the unincorporated areas of Southern California which showed a total of $J1,091,999.00 as compared against the *34 total of $5,769,289.00.  Sixty-nine southland cities were included on the authorized list released, with Arcadia trailing the following 20 communities:  Los Angeles, Long Beach, San. Diego, Beverly Hills, Alhambra, San Marino, Pasadena, Glencjale, Santa Monica, Burbank, Fresno, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Bakersfield, Riverside, Vernon, Huntington Park, Compton, Santa Ana and Anaheim.  This city led such cities as: Fullerton, Monrovia, Pomona, Inglewood, San Gabriel, La Verne, Her-mosa Beach, South Pasadena, Whittier, Laguna Beach, Santa Maria, Montebello, Manhattan Beach, Torrance, Palos Verles, Redondo Beach, Culver City and Huntington Beach.  As has been disclosed before, the bulk of Arcadia’s building during 1935 was in the construction of new residences here, More than 60 permits were issued for new homes, several of the permits calling for two or more homes on the same request.  From all indications, the year 1936 has started where the amazing 1935 total left off, what with several permits for more new dwellings being issued at the city hall since the turn of the new year.  PARADE  CGPYRikHT i«? $ b • fan L .y F%ZEHAK  Harry Carr leaves us this phrase: •Citizen Fixit.'—Fido bays At the moon as Fixit does.  Hoover makes the wires buzz,  Calls for an apology;  Ickes claimed that Herbert C. Flirted with the Constitution,  That he started its dilution.  Fifteen year old Georgia wife Starts her matrimonial liie With three babies in a day Without AAA okay.  Point made by Mark Sullivan,  Well known in the writing clan, Showing how the President,  This year to the White House sent, Will, by filling empty places With renewed Supreme Court faces Shape our coming history Through that high consistory.  So what I!    R. M. ORR.  Motorists Warned To Get Plates Avoid Penalty  SACRAMENTO, Jan. 13.—California motorists today were sharply awakened to the fact that they must register their vehicles for 1936 prior to midnight January 30 or pay 100 percent penalty in vehicle license fees.  “The new vehicle code definitely sets January 30 as the final day for payment of vehicle license fees,” said Ray Ingels, director of motor vehicles, “so there is absolutely no chance for extension of time to avoid heavy penalties/’  Immediate attention to 1936 registration was urged by Ingels to avoid last minute rushes and inconveniences for citizens. “Each department branch office, California aPtrol office and automobile club reports a slowing up of registrations, so now is the time for the wist mo* torist to get his plates with least inconvenience,” said the director.  Thirty-Eight Attend Breakfast At Legion Hall  Thirty-eight members of the Holy Name Society of the Church of the Holy Angels yesterday morning convened for the January breakfast-meeting of the organization in the Legion hall on North First avenue.  This group meets on the second Sunday of every month.  Frank Jenel, prominent Los Angeles attorney, was the principal speaker yesterday. James Summers, president of the society, presided.  BOLES NAMED POSTMASTER  WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. (INS)— President Roosevelt today sent the nomination of Frank J. Boles to the Senate to be postmaster at Monrovia, CaliJ.  Tonight, 8 p. m.—Short-form Initiation at meeting of Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States at Three Deuces Cafe.  a # *  January 14th and 15th, Tuesday and Wednesday—Benefit show for Eastern Star, Arcadia Theatre.  * * •  January 14th, Tuesday—Americanization class (sewing) city hall, 10 a, m. to 1:30 p. m.  ♦ ♦ •  January 14th, Tuesday — Bridge and five hundred party, 8 p. m., at home of Mrs. A, Thompson, 430 Fairvlew,  ♦ ♦ *  Thursday, January 16—Program to be given in Community Church social hall by Cotton-Biossom Singers, Sliver offering.  9 9m  January 24th—Men’s Fellowship dinner-meeting at Community Church. Dr Stewart McLennan, speaker,  • ♦ ♦  Saturday, January 25th—PubUo dance at American Legion hall, Don Williams' orchestra.  • • •  Arcadia Theatrs  Now Playing—‘'Last Day» of Pompeii” also “Music Xs Mafic«”   

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