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Arcadia Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: December 31, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Arcadia Daily Tribune

Location: Arcadia, California

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   Arcadia Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - December 31, 1935, Arcadia, California                                 W    •  •#  Arcmf Mofiic NmipafMr ..  ALL THE HOME NEWS ALL THE TIME  FfkOfM 21J1  THE ARICAIDI:A  DEVOTED TO THE PROGRESS AND PROSPERTY OF ARCADIA  __nJ__  Arcadia*» Home NewMpaper  TRIBUNE WANT ADS GET RESULTS  Phone 2M3M  yof.I,Ko.2  Arcadia, Catif., Tues., Dec^^siT, 1935  ------ - . ■ _  Singte Copy 5c  CITÏS fLfllT  Y:i  Three Race Horses Shown Flying From Starling Gate On Arcadia Entry  EARLY CALIFORNIA THEME  S. M. U., Stanford Clash in Rose Bowl'East-West Classic Tomoiirow Afternoon  BULLETIN LOS ANGELES, Dec. 31.—Sunshine was prophesizcd today for PuBdena’s Tournament of Roses uid the East*West football g'ame tomorrow.  Thousands upon thousands of men, women, and children, hailing from all sections of the nation tomorrow will line the streets of Pasadena to witness the annual Tournament of Roses parade ... the fitting prologue of every New Year in the southland.  With early California history as the general theme, the parade ito-morrow Is expected to overshadow all previous Rose Tournaments. The Arcadia Chamber of Commerce will be represented by one of the most elaborate floats ever entered in the Crown City colorful “pageant on wheels.”  “The Start” is the title given to the local entry and will portray horse racing in California in the days of long ago when E. J. (Lucky) Baldwin faltered the “sport of kings” here on his old rancho. With tiny girls masquerading as jockeys, the Queen City float, featuring pom pom chrysanthemums as the major decorative medium, will show three horses breaking from the starting stall. Over 25 feet in length, the Arcadia float is destined to draw more than its share of applause as It glides along the line of march.  Cliff Kenworthy was chairman of the float committee this year.  Included In the throng which will crowd the Pasadena streets . . . rain or shine . , . will be a large delegation from Texas, the Lone Star state, who, after the colorful spectacle, will hurry to the Arroyo Seco where Southern Methodist University's classy footbalUteam will oppose Stanford in the grid classic on the Rose Bowl turf,  Sold out completely several weeks ago, close to 90,000 people will watch this year's Bast-West football epic unroll on the greensward of. the Rose Bowl, scene of many historic gridiron battles, A wet field tomorrow will swing the betting odds decidedly to the big Red machine from Palo Alto. On a fast grid, however, the dazzling, open style of play emphasized by the Mustangs from the plains of Texas Is doped to carry too many surprises for the Stanfordltes,  Pour all-American, players will bte seen In action as these two strong elevens clash tomorrow. For S. M. U., Bobby (Dynamite) Wilson, pint-sized halfback, and Truman Spain. 200-pound tackle, have earned national recognition, while Bobby Qrayson, fleet-footed, line-crashing fullback, and Jim (Monk) Moscrip, end, whose accurate field goals have brought several triumphs to thé Indians, have been placed on all-star mythical teajns this fall by national critics.  More than 4000 entries are expcctcd hi the Pan Pacific Poultry Expo<Uliou scheduled for January 11-19 at the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. Chickcns, duclts, geese, pigeons, turkeys, pea fowl, guhiea fowl and v.' cf game birds of all descriptions will be on display, with many entries Ij received daily by Claude A. Potter, manager of the show. Sliown above Barbara Bree, who lives In Arcadia, and has for her pets some blue ribboir chickens to be on exhibit at the Exposition. In Barbara’s lap is “Noisy,” a it prize Australorp. On the right a Black Cochin Is shown, and on Barbara's ' '«shoulder we havo an Inquisitive little Old English Game pullet.  AtR-CONDtTtONED HOUSES NOW  AVAILABLE FOR HENS; MODELS  TO BE SHOWN AT EXPOSITION  Air conditioned houses fitted with ‘ artificial stimulant, (formerly had  metal furnishings and automatic ^tisfaction of knowing that  electrical devices are now available • “^hts were turned on early in  ithe morning durmg winter to cut for the lowly hen. according to    their hours of rest, the owner  Claude A. Potter, manager of the had to get up to attend to It and to Pan-Pacific Poultry Exposition to be feed them. However, the hens are held January 1-19 in the Pan-Pacl- behind again because timing devices  fic Auditorium,  and automatic switches have been  The innovations will stimulate egg devised that not only turn on the production by keeping the houses at lights, but also open the feed hop-a comfortable temperature no mat- pers.  ter what Is going on outside, accord- All of these improvements will be ing to local poultry breeders,    ' on display during the exposition, ac-  Laylng hens, long the object of cording to Mr, Potter.  0^  December 31st, Tuesday—Ka Ya Ne Camp Fire Girls’ annual year-end hike. Meet at 11 o'clock at Duarte road and Santa Anita.  0 0 0  January 2nd, Thursday—Women’s Oulld will meet for luncheon and business meeting at the church at 12:30.  • • •  January 3rd, Friday — Woman’s J31ub luncheon meeting at clubhouM lU li:U.  Hold Inquest In Arcadian’s Death  Charles R. Smith Killed Monday In Auto Crash In Monrovia Enroute To Work  Seventy Presents Delivered By PTA Thrift Shop  Settled in its new location, 208 North First avenue, the P.-T. A, Thrift Shop today gave .the oflicial resume of the good work performed by this welfare organization this An Inquest into the death of. Christmas season.  Charles R. Smith, 24-year-old Arcadian, who died from injuries re-‘reived In an automobile crash In Monrovia Monday morning was slated to be held at the Renaker Funeral Parlors at 1:30 p. m. today with Coroner Frank Nance in charge.  Enroute to his place of business, the Ellen Reed Candy Shop, Smith, who resided at 7 El Dorado, was thrown from his machine when his car and one driven by S, M. Sons-tanian of Pasadena, collided at the Colorado - Mayflower intersection Both cars were compleitely wrecked, but the Pasadenan and his passenger, Andrew Cadwell of San Francisco, escai>ed with minor injuries.  Smith passed away in the Monrovia hospital at 10:30 a. m, Monday. His skull was fractured.  Young Smith leaves his widow, Kathryn Pottenger Smith, niece of Dr. Francis M. Potbenger, head of the nationally - known Pottenger Sanitarium, in Monrovia, and two small children, one two months old.  Mr, Smith came to Southern California from the east, and for a time was connected with Security-National Bank of Los Angeles, and later purchasing an interest in the Ellen Reed candy store In Monro-ViM.  Seventy Christmas orders and baskets filled with groceries, meat, candies, fruit, nuts and toys were sent out from the Thrift Shop as holiday cheer.  Many donations were received prior to Christmas Day to aid this unit in its fine cause. The list of contributors included; Toys from school children from Holly and First avenue schools; a church friend, $6.00; Boys and Girls League of the Monrovia-Arcadia-Duarte high school, $12.10; Campfire Girls, 22 glasses of marmalade; social club of the Eastern Star, 160 bags of candy; toys painted and remodeled by Robert Stalcup; welding by Horace Crowell and C. B. Jones.  Those helping pack the baskets were Mesdames A. R. Eastwood, Albert Adcock, R. H. Scofield and Al-rena Ellison.  Today kie»uiis  First Eace  Bay Buddy    . .  Stolen Colors No Worry  Second Race  Blackboard    5.00  Shady Girl    UM  CivUUa  3.^0  4.4U  4.20  8.00  Legionnaires Sponsoring Dance At Clubhouse; Inn To Hold Gala Celebration  The last day of 1935 and the early hours of the first day In 1936 will be observed by many Arcadians in Arcadia, according to word released from various headquarters this morning. Glenn Dyer Post No. 247. American Legion, tonight is sponsoring a New Year’s Eve Ball at its clubhouse on North First avenue «to which the public is cordially invited. Fred Hildebrand and his Casa Del Rey Orchestra will furnish music for dancing which starts at 9 p. m. and last till the “wee small hours.” Tickets are selling at 50 cents for gentlemen. 25 cents for ladies, and 75 cents per couple.  One of the gayest New Year celebration spots in the southland will be the Santa Anita Inn on West Huntington di’ive. A gala floor show is featured on tonight’s bill at the Inn. Dining and dancing will be enjoyed by several large parties at the Inn, according to the long list of reservations filed this week.  A quiet, humble observance of the coming of the New Year will be held in the social hall of the Arcadia Community Church with Simple services scheduled for the midnight liour.    ^ '  WORLD WIDE NEWS FLASHES  From International News Service  Compliments Paid Tribune On Debut As Daily Paper  Making its debut in the dally field in a mcdest manner, the Arcadia Tribune yesterday afternoon gave a full coverage edition to Arcadians, and today receive compliments from all sides on the initial issue.  Continuing its chief aim ... to foster the progress and prosperity of Arcadia . . . the Tribune made its bow in the daily line, not in a big way, but in a manner befitting such an undertaking. As the city of Arcadia grows, the Arcadia Daily Tribune will grow, stressing local news at all times, but carrying International News Service flashes of world-wide interest as well as stock market and poultry quotations.  The Tribune . . . Independent and non-parti.^an . . . enters the daily field with the praises of home folks and outsiders alike ringing in its ears. “We have always considered Arcadia a community that was worthy of a daily newspaper and we compliment you on your efforts to bring Arcadia into her stride'* reads a part of one letter received by P. M. Martindale, publisher, yesterday.  Over 300 volunteer subscriptions above the regular subscribers were received at the Tribune office this week end, several coming from non-rcfcidents interested in the “baby^' daily. Solicitors will soon call at your home for your subscription if you desire to have the home town daily brought to you every afternoon. Subscriptions will also be taken at the Tribune office, 104 North First avenue, phone 2131.  Mrs. Frank G. Roush has been selected to serve as advertising manager of tlie Daily Tribune for the time being, and it is the hope of this paper that local merchants, in advertising with us, consider it a civic duty and pride to be cooperating in this needed venture, besides receiving the greatest dollar value in the advertising field offered in the southland.  The Daily Tribune is your newspaper ... it stands ready to serve.  TAKt'S OVER DUTIES  ROOSEVELT DISCUSSES NEUTRALITY  WASHINGTON. DEC. 31—«INS) Still gravely concerned over the European war crisis. President Roosevelt today summoned an important meetmg of high ranking congressional and State Department Officials to discuss what neutrality legislation the administration should seek from congress in an effort to keep the United States out of war.  Tlie meeting will take place at the White House late this afternoon. It will be attended by Secrrtary of State Cordell Hull, Assistant Secretary of State R. Walton Moore. State Department Chief Advisor on Neutrality, Senator Key Pittman. Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations committee and Rep. Samuel D. McReynolds, Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.  ]ID[  1  JÌ  SUMMON THELMA’S GIRL FRIEND  HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 31.- -(INS)—In an effort to pierce the mystery of the death of glamorous Thelma Todd, the County Grand Jury today summoned as a witness Miss Todd’s closest girl friend, blonde Catherine Hunter. Secretary to Charles Chaplin, and now aiding Chapin in writing of his memories.  TOWNSEND PLAN INDORSED  INDIANAPOLIS. IND., DEC. 31-iINC)—The Townsend Old Age pension plan gained its first indorsement by a major Indiana Political leader today.  M. Bert Thurman, former Republican National Committeeman for Indiana and former Collector of Internal Revenue for this state, who Ls expeoied to announce his candidacy for the G.O.P. gubernatorial nomination, issued a statement today praising the Townsend proposal.  The action makes it certain the Townsend Plan will be an issue in the 1936 campaign in this state.  CANVASS BONUS COMPROlVnSE  WASHINGTON. DEC. 31 (INS)—The possibility of framing a compromise $2.000.000.000 soldiers’ bonus bill was canvassed today at a con-lersnce between Speaker Byrnes of the House and Rep. Wright Putnam (D) of Texas, author of the Patman “Inflation” bill.  The conference marked the first step in Byrns* campaign to prevent passage of a bonus which would be vetoed by President Rook-velt .  EMPLOY ALIENS AT WHITE HOUSE  WASHINGTON, DEC. 31 — <INS)—Disclosed that several thousand aliens are employed in the Administrative Agencies of the Federal Government was made today by Rep. Charles Kramer <D) ol California.  TWENTY-THREE ITALIAN LEADERS SLAIN  ADDIS ABABA. DEC. 31.—«INS)—Fighting which may develop into the major battle of the Italo-Etliiopian war broke on the Northern Front today, according to unofliclal reports received here, with thre© great Eethiopian armies numbering hundreds of thousands of men conr verging upon Makale.  Twenty-three Italian officers were reported among the slain. Casualties were reported extremely heavy on both sides.  LINDBERGH DENIES RUMOR  LIVERPOOL, DEC. 31—‘INS) Col. Charles A. Lindbergh today de*^ niod the report he intended to abandon his American citizenship.  Surrounded by niterviewers, he refused to talk but made it clear he had no intention of giving up his American citizenship.  Big Hamburgers Feature Of Menu At Elmer’s Place  Featuring the biggest ten-cent hamburger in Southern California, Elmer E. E. Swanton of Elmer’s Place on North First Avenue is rapidly gaining favor among “ham-burger-fans.”  Chili-con-carne de lux. made from an exclusive recipe “concocted” by Major Barngrower. is another top-liner on Elmer’s bill-of-iare.  Budwiser Beer on tap is another headliner at Elmer’s Place.  Todays Poultry Prices  Mrs. Anne Leigh, new llbrarian-In-chief, took over her official duties at the Public Library on North First avenue on December 26. Mrs. Leigh succeeds Mrs. Bertha Lewis, who resigned the position some time ago.  As soon as a suitable place can be found, Mrs.    ^ail make  her h^jnti in Arcadi|i.  Stock Market Resume  NEW YORK. Dec 31. < INS »--The stock market said goodbye to 1935 and hello to 1936 with a bullish demonstration today.  An opening buying rush sent the ticker one minute behind but trad- Stags, 12c.  LOS ANGELES. Dec. 31.—(INS)— Los Angeles Poultry Market:  Hens. Leghorns, 2^ to 3H lbs., 17c Hens, Leghorns, over 2Vi and up to 4 lbs., 18c.  Hens, Leghorns, over 4 lbs., 18c. Hens. Colored. 3Vi to 4 lbs., 23c.  I Hens, Colored. 4 lbs. and up, 24c. Broilers, over 1 and up to V/2 lbs., 21c Broilers, over iv^ and up to 2%, 21c Fryers, Leghorns, over 2 Vi and up to 3 lbs., 18c.  Fryers, Barred Rocks, over 2H and up to 3»^ lbs.. 23c.  I Fryeri), other than barred rocks,  I over 2V.i to 3^^ lbs.. 23c. Roasters, soft bone barred rocks over 3*>b lbs, and up. 23c.  Roasters, soft bone, other than barred rocks, over lbs.. 23c.  ing quieted after this flurry with prices throughout the list firm to strong. Gains in pacemakers ran to 26 points.  Aviation and oil shares vied for leadership, with most of the issues in both of these groups registering new highs ior dhe year,  Douglas gained l‘a points. Others to hit new highs were United Aircraft. Boeing, Curtiss-Wright “A”, and Sperry Corp.  Standard of New Jersey pushed  Old Roosters. 11c.  Ducklings, 19c.  Old Ducks. 11c.  Geese, 16c.  Squabs, mider 11 lbs., doz. 26c. Squabs. 11 lbs., doz. 28c.  Capons, under 7 lbs., 26c.  Capons, 7 lbs, and up. 28c.  Rabbits No. 1 white -to 4*4, 12c Rabbits, No. 1, mixed to Vas, 10c Rabbits, old. 6c.  Bond luue Which Installed Pipe In 1915 Extends Until December of '54  CAST-IRON PIPE NEEDED  LOS ANGELES Dec. 3L—(IN8)—  ahead a point to a new 1935    =  while Consolidated Oil led the „^  cheaper is. -s Into new high ground.    ^ ^  Amerada ako set a new high.  U. S. Gypsiun featured building;  shares with a run-up of 2 points. • l ». e ' _*  Timken Roller Bearing was up al- '    ^ « oo  *0 4, «    TT G ■ Candled Clean Extras. 32c.  most 2 in auto equipments. U. S.    Extras. 31c.  Wh f ^ « »tf    fl half npnt'    Standards. 30c.  Wheat was up nearly a half cent, _ ^ r i i    J .  a bushel. Cotton was up 30 cents a    Standards, 27c  New Lines To Be Quarter-Inch Steel, Inferior To More Expensive Type  That the taxpayers of the city of Arcadia for the next 18 years will be paying for approximately 22.000 feet of 16-inch riveted steel water-pipe, to be abandoned on Santa Anita avenue, was brought to light today when it was recalled that .the pipe to be replaced by the PWA project was installed under the 40-year Bond Issue of 1914.  Already delinquent of this bond, the taxpayers have close to 19 years to go to pay off ^this bonded indebtedness. Yet part of the mains are in such poor condition that they must be replaced immediately. A severe ground shock, such as that resulting from an earthquake, would rip the present lines wide open. The pipe is also too small now to adequately supply the needs of the district served by them.  The riveted-steel pipe installed in ’15 was not the best on the market, but the city at that time could not afford cast-iron, regarded as the ‘‘tops*' in this line. Riveted steel pipe was installed under the 40-year-issue, when this type of pipe is known to only have a life of 25 years at the outside. Cast-iron pipe not only has a lengthy life, but also carries a salvage price whenever the lines are not large enough to fill the needs. No other pipe has a salvage price.  EJconomically pressed at the time, the city was not set financially to afford cast-iron pipe, which would have been a saving in the long run.  Last night the present council were presented plans and specifications for the 30-inch pipe which will replace the abandoned lines by F. S. Currie, supervising engineer. Currie will seek the PWA approval following the local council's action in a special meeting Friday morning. Currie, who is to recclve a commission for his supervision of tlie project, despite the fact tluit city of Arcadia has a capable water engineer in Scott M. Lee, exhibited the plans and specifications, which call for quarter-inch steel pipe« said to be inferior to the cast-iron type.  Disgruntled rumors from many sources raise the question: Why is it the city can afford to pay an outside engineer to supervise the work, and yet camiot find funds to install cast-iron pii>e . . . a money-savcr over a i>criod of years?  On ithis project, the federal government vAll furnish 45 per cent of the total cost or 135.430.00, \\1th tha city paying the remainder or $43.-400, this amomit to be drawn from the water reserve. The mains will extend from (the restj .olr on North Santa Anita down the double drive to Duarte road. All local men obtainable will be used on the project which should be underway vvithln the next few weeks.  bale.  Markets at a glance:  Stocks, strong.  Curb, strong.  Bonds, irregularly higher.  Call Money, 3-4 per cent.  Cotton, futures steady; up 2 to 4 points.  Chicago Wheat, up 1-8 to l-2c. Foreign Exchange, dollar firm.  Candled Checks, 29c.  Medium Eggs-r Candled Clean Extras, 27V^c. Candled Light Dirty Extras, 26c. Candled Clean Standards, 26c. Candled Light Dirty Standards^ 25c Candled Checks, 25c.  Small Eggs—  Candled Clean Extras, 26c.  Candled Ligh& Dirty Extra«, 2i%c, Case Count Eggs^ 29c.  COSTLY COLLECTION  ELYRIA, O., Dec. 30 (INS)—Res-idents of the village of Grafton, south of here, are convinced there Is no Santa Claus. The vllluge ob-^ talned a refund for overcharges of $2.000 from the Reserve Power and Light Co., and also negotiated for a new five-year electric rate ordinance which, it was estimated, would save $9.474 for the ilve years. Then the village was billed for $&,•• 7>6 for attorneys' fees for XMr services in obtaining the refun4 and the new lower rate.   

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