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Arcadia Bulletin Newspaper Archive: August 15, 1940 - Page 1

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Publication: Arcadia Bulletin

Location: Arcadia, California

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   Arcadia Bulletin (Newspaper) - August 15, 1940, Arcadia, California                                 >  1 Volume 2, Number 46  “ Arcadia? s Home Newspaper”  Arcadia, California, Thursday, August 15, 1940  $1 per year—single copy 5c  r**i  Äfiäsiia Aggregate Fire Loss  así Year $3245  Wallace Adaimson, vice principal of Garfield ¡High f/chool in East Los Angeles, is opposing JL Jerry Voorhis for Congress on the Democratic ticket at the Augfust 27th 'primary election.  Mr. Adamson has made his own living since the age of ten as farmer, quarrymian, salesman, ’stenographer, assistant pesonnel manager for a large corporation, First Lieutenant in the World War, and school teacher He has a Business Administration degree .and a Master of Arts in Economics degree from the University of Southern Cal-  Candidates To Speak At Republican Rally  FIRE CHIEF MAKES ANNUAL. REPORT  One of the lowest records of fire loss in the city’s history is  F°rf ¿pirLTnT a 'fUed PO by°'nr' 1 T »^sday EVeiling  Chief James M. Nellis.    Four Republican candidates  The per capita fire loss for the • for United States Representative fiscal year ending June 30, 1940, from the 12th district will offer was .324 cents, based on a 10,000  TALK TO THEN  At the regular meeting of the Arcadia Rotary Club last Friday, Ugene U. Blalock, deputy district attorney of Los Angeles   1M , 14  v»*»«...»».* „ 1U     when she learned of his accident i county and legal advisor of the  .—------------------- _ — voters in this neighborhood an ■ an< ^ ^  a * so  * n  th €  hospital. Mr. i ^os Angeles county Grand Jury  population figure. The total loss, opportunity to hear their plat- Dexter was thrown through the or  e  P®®    years, gave a ............- — 'forms when they make brief ad- windshield of the car and was stirring talk on the theme The  Arcadia Man Injured On Trip North  Myron E. Dexter, 1020 Sixth avenue, Arcadia, was seriously injured when his car struck a soft shoulder near Lone Pine last Friday evening. Mr. Dexter is an executive of the Richfield Oil Company.  He was taken to the hospital at Lone Pine, where his condition is reported improved. Mrs. Dexter, who was with him but not seriously hurt, collapsed  .ß  -, m ili  _'A  W> '■'■■■■  t  •‘s/S/.  m it*- '%■  Ä'  »  vsy.  m  •**  <*/»>  w V  %W M  '*7  '-¿v ‘Æ  k k\  i  %  <&&&* -  «  7',  0/M  > «V ■  ■ , i  aggregate was $3245.  Seventy alarms were answered, among them being: stills, 61; general, none; false, nine.  Paid men answering calls numbered 263; volunteers, 21. Inhalator calls numbered eight.  Firemen made 172 inspections of residences and vacant lots; 75 inspections of business houses, and answered 23 complaints. A | ENJOYING A  dresses in the auditorium of the  t  found 75 feet from where the First Avenue school, Arcadia, on j  car  turned over.  Tuesday, August 20th. The meet- f  ing is called for 8 o’clock in the S. VACATION CLASS  evening and the following speakers will appear: Mr. Shelby, Mr.  Erdman, Mr. Minger and Mr. Hoeppel.  RECITAL TONIGHT  Sponsored by Harold Scott and  dr -, A  W:.  total of 115 fire drills were held with 89 volunteers responding to drills.  Fires and their causes are listed as follow?: Automobile (nine), caused by cigarette, three; short in wiring, four; accident, one;  MOTOR TRIP  Mrs. William Rodney Pearson of Lemon avenue, accompanied by her. sister, Mrs. Irene Hald, is motoring through Wyoming South Dakota and Utah, visit-  George Boyer, a recital will be given tonight at 8 o’clock in the high school auditorium by the i summer orchestra class, which has been directed during vacation time bv the two musicians.  Meaning of Liberty.”  He brought out the fact that there are in this country two conflicting theories of government which, unless checked, will ultimately clash. There is a feeling Lhat everybody has the right to say and do e.- they please. This theory has allowed organizations in this country to grow up opposing our own form of guvern-, ment and advocating its over-  Mrs. Nina Blethen, Alberta • throw by any means possible. He Duryea and Mr. Scott will be the] stated that we should take a accompanists for the solos, with  1  lesson from the dictator govern-  backfire, one; brush and gras? mg relative- in Wyoming. They (»even); caused by incinerator, \ expect to return around the 20th. one; dump, two: cigarette, two:  Mr. Boyer directing the orche ira! numbers.  The public is invited to attend.  -p  Man-  c v'en  firo-  I  WALLACE ADAMSON  ifornio, and he holds member-. ship in Phi Delta Kappa, National honor fraternity in Education, and Beta Gamma .Sigma, Business honor Society in the United States, as well as being listed in Who’s Who in Education.  Adamson is known through-, out the country as a writer, in the field of education, and is recognized .as an authority on youth problems and juvenile delinquency in Southern Calif.  Fifteen years of excellent service at Garfiefld High School has been Mr. Adamson’s record. He organized the first Junior Coordinating Council in the United States and served as president of the East Los Angeles Coordinating Council. The East Los Angeles Y’s Men’s Club and Montebello Post 272, American Legion, were organized by Adamson during the same time. Mr. Adamson has served as president of the Masonic Education Club of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles School Men’s Club, and has been president of the East Los Angeles Y. M. C. A. for the pa t two years.  Mr. Adamson is an active worker in the Alhambra Baptist church, a civic leader in greater East Los Angeles and recognized as a youth leader on committees in the Boy Scouts, Y, M. C. A., and as an adult member of the Woodcraft Rangers.  Friends of Adamson point out that he served as a First Lieutenant of Infantry during the World War and was recommended for the Distinguished Service Cross and cited for gallant conduct in battle. Adamson is an active worker in the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and other service .groups. He is "As American as a cob pipe."  firecrackers, one.  Attic:- (tw’0>; caused by taneous combustion, one: ket behind overheated one: vent from stove, om ■ place, one: ovorh-eated furnace, one; defective chimney, one; gas ranges, one; matches, one; kerosene lamp, one; chicken houses (five); open fire, one; defective their wives and friends attended wiring, two; children playing’the annual installation Thurs-with matches, two.    ' day night of Glenn Dyer unit.  t I p r*? È «  UAli  rys  m ~  More than 250 legionnaires+  Garage (three); unknown, one:  No. 247 officers, American Le-rleiective incinerator, one; child-1 ®| on  Auxiliary held in the Le-ren playing with matches, one; theatre (one) marquet; chimney  (one), vines growing over top; safe (one;; welding (one;; gas (one), gas heater; stable (one), cigarette; tree (one), open fire.   1  gion clubhouse, which was beautifully decorated with flowers and potted plants for the occasion.  LANDMARK DISAPPEARS  One» of the oldest structures in Arcadia and one with a "past” is being torn down at First ave-ue and St. Joseph street. This structure was known as thi ’’Claraville,” having been named in honor of Clara Baldwin. This place used to flourish as a tavern when the west wa stii! young and before the time of most people residing in Arcadia . today.  Hiaded by Mrs. Naomi Steele, retiring president of the 18th District. members oi the ritual team inducted the following officers: President. Mrs. Gladys Wells; fir: t- wee president, Mrs. Olga E.vin- ..econd vice prt-id--nt. Mrs. Walter Coombs; secretary. Mrs. Elsie K nib: treasurer, Mrs Ellen Norris, hi torian. Mrs. William D. I.;bb> chaplain. M i Frances David; : erseant-at-arms M l Nettie Farnsworth  Marshal. Mrs Maude A. Fox;  musician, Mrs. Muriel Kent; executive board.* Mrs. Anna Stine, Mrs. Kalhiyn Wrede and Mrs. Virginia  Cummings.  In accepting the gavel for her year as executive chairman, Mrs. Wells made an address, thanking all for placing her in the responsible position. She announced the following chairmen appointments: Membership, Mrs. Buzard • Americanism, Mrs. Arthur Nelson; Poppy. Ml’s Norris; hospital, Mi\-> Marianna Wisniewski; communitv service, Mrs. Wrede; courtesy Mrs. Ewing; legislation. Mrs. Fox; parliamentarian. Mrs. Cline; unemployment, Mrs. Farnsworth; hospitality Mrs. Stine: youth activity. Mrs. Dorothy Shav;; constitution and by-laws Mr> Scofield: dis-astei and relief, Mrs Edith Pres-;jn. national defense, Mrs. Virginia Cummings publicity Mr. Edna Anderson: national new . Mrs Doroth.v Carver; auditor. Mrs. Emma E. Hamer; child well an*, Mr. Albert Adcock; i-duca"'? Mr.'- Grace Cornish; house chairman, Mrs S. S Stubb.-. program. Mrs. Coombs and finance. Mrs. Harriett Corrie.  With Apologies to Westbrook  Mr, Ernie Spelvin, Arcadia cousin of George Spelvin, the American citizen, was sitting in a Huntington Drive barber shop the other day thinking about America. lie was thinking that this i* a pretty good country and he said so.  li. said, ’Ed, this is a pretty good country,” and then lapsed into a smiling silence,  ’’Anything in particular on your jiiinu, Ernie?” the barber asked.  Ernie said, ”Oh, I was just thinking. Next Tuesday jngnt at the First Avenue school they’re-gonna let four candidates for United States. Representative make speeches to the voters. Yup—eight o’clock. There are gonna be short talks by Mr. Shelby, Mr. Erdman, Mr. Minger, and Mr. Hoeppel. Anybody can come to the meeting. Anybody that wants to—Republican or  Cutting Red Tape. Gr,  Arcadia B-L Association  Democrat or Wilkie Democrat or even a New Dealer,—why, Ed, any of ’em can come and listen ;nd make up his mind which one < f these guys he’s gonna vote fo. m the primaries.”  ’’That so?”  'Yup,” Eddie added in passing: ”No clippers on the sides. Yes, oir, ’ he went on, ’’and this is about the last country left where ou got .. free choice Most plae if you don’t vote right they just shoot ya. Here if you don’l right you just merely lie- sighed happily.  ”Its kind of a thrill,” he continued. ”— a mighty thrilling tn.. ; to realize that we, the people, cun sit out there in the First Avenue auditorium next Tuesday night and decide which one of four gentlemen we want to vote for in the primaries." And he added: "We can argue with ’em —there or anywhere. We can talk*back.  **-■- ........... ......■;    ----_    r-    •    - - --  A Home Institution  We can ask questions. We can speak our minds without fear or reprisals—and so can they.” He added, in parenthesis: ’’Comb it dry.” And presently he said solemnly: ’’It’s a great country . Sometimes, y’know, I think we get so used to freedom lhat wi kinda get indifferent to it. W< think just because wo always HAD freedom we alwa W 1L1 hav it. ’Taint so Our ' fathers got freedom fightin’ jor it- md w an k< p h for t- <ut if    get careles:  vith our votin’ we’ll be fightin’ fo: ■; ug.iin. '  "You going to the meeting?' the barber asked  ’’Sure," said Ernie Spelvin. ’’Everybody oughta. Eight -o’clock  —Tuesday, August 20th — First Avenue School."  At the door, on his way out, he said: "Short speeches.”  ments and not only claim the right but demand as a matter of duty that such organizations be dissolved and overthrown  The framert ol the Constitution drafted a document :itend<'d .or the .veifan •: tli peupi, hole and ’ for ,af v;dual bodies, fk argued tor ire«, dom within ti.i law and not .. i const The da ger m tin country lies a the au&einx* ui a spmal ¡column in the American people the country is actually ,governed by people elected by a mi only of the people. The>^ well organized minorities are putting their people in office and forcing laws to their liking through the legislatures and congress.  Citizenship should be determined oy what is being done to earn it. Work should be done tc build more oi what we call Americanism. 1 lit 1  Hung needed in the U. S. now is not just flag waving, but more men who art llag server.-  Miss Ramona Gerald, artist ironi the C B. S. studio at Minneapolis and a member of tnt Minm*apolus Symphony Orche: tra. delighted the club  ( Witli eial instrumental selection was introduced by Mis; Lm of tli*' music department ■ Arcadia High School.  Bin Ragan introduced '.: nc editor tin Arcadia Tribune, Jim Daley.  It \\ ..s announci u that District Governor, Jimmie Ingham, will make his official visit to club on Friday, August 30.  The club baseball team Flying A’s to a 7-4 score Wednesday.  Tony Whan, humorist, connected with Wilson & C-... will be the guest speaker Friday. -He will talk on the -ubjeci ’Deounkmg the Meat Industry."  * !M  St  tat.  ti  the  held  last  *V1V * Luii'  Arcadi , C  Dear Si  1 ould    i  your -tai    .n  Dyer Um    2Y,  Auxiliai\    a  An  and  enn  gion  <; Of  its retiring president, :\lr B, Buzard, for the publicity youi paper carried for our organization during the past year.  We sincerely appreciate your help in furthering our Auxiliary work.    MAUDE A. FOX,  Retiring Publicity Chairman^  WÜ1 help you fi»anee Vorn* old or new Home   

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