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   Northwest Arkansas Times (Newspaper) - January 4, 1976, Fayetteville, Arkansas                               Worries Police Wives! Story On Page 19 VOC 108 201 The Public Interest Is The First Concern Of This Newspaper FAYETTEVILLE, 'ARKANSAS, SUNDAY, JANUARY CENTS At Least 38 Reported Killed Storm Lashes W. Europe By.The Associated Press A, storm with IQQ-mile-an-hour winds whipped across Western Curope Saturdaj killing at least 38 persons destroying crops, disrupting .shipping and threatening floods in Holland, Denmark and Germany. Gusts ripped roots from buildings, swept automobiles from lighways and people from sidewalks. Power, lines .were blown down and ships tossed -dangerously along the Use British Isles, 24 persons were reported killed, most in -accidents involving winds that reached m p h A Lon don weather center spokesman called it Britain's worst windstorm, in 29 years. West Germany reported 10 storm-related deaths, the Netherlands two and France and Belgium one each. In the Netherlands and on Denmark's Jutland- Peninsula, authorities kept an; on dikes that hold back the North Sea from hundreds of thousands of low-lying farmland acres. More than people were evacuated from their homes in southwestern Jutland as the sea strained at the dikes. But police said the immediate danger was over by late Saturday afternoon as high tide ebbed with no serious breaches in earthen seawalls. .The mass evacuation by car. bus; train and ambulance without panic, loss of life or injury. Volunteers joined home guard and civil defense units in patrolling the dikes arid shoring up minor gaps. Residents began moving back lo their homes in southwestern Jutland Saturday evening, but the area remained in a state of flood alert. Authorities said the dikes had been badly battered and there would be hew danger if another storm hil-in the next few days. Several deaths in Britain on the roads. A Royal Automobile 'Club .spokesman said many areas of the country were "like a giant bowling alley with trees littered like ninepins all over the At .least .two motorcyclists were kil led i n separate incidents .when; their cycles smashed -into fallen trees. At Ki Hern an. near Dublin, Ireland, a falling tree crushed a 19-year-old -youth on a bicycle. West German naval helicop-te'rs plucked 22 seamen ships in the 'loweij Elbe (River. where the winds peaked at 112 m.p.h. The nurncane force winds blew an elderly woman frarri her balcony in Holland Winds rjppea the roof from a house m Low er Saxony and sent tha chimney crashing down on a 29-j ear old woman Officials said both died. i i A Tnan .were; reported killed Leeds in northern England when their; trailer home was blown over. Mercenary Funds Provided, (AP Troop Training Denied FLOODING IN DENMARK rescue warier comes woman at Esbjerg Harbor as (he area was evacuated after vimd and snow damaged (AP) -i-. Ford declared Saturday hbt the United States is not raining foreign mercenaries to ghl in Angola, but he Wuuld ot deny that the government is nroviding money for such train-ng Ford also said that the Jnited States is "making: wadway" In diplomatic 'Headway is being made in ef- s rts to get both the Soviet Un- j n and Cuba to end their, in- t ovement in Angola, he said, v ut "I can't: say categorically S lat Ihe end result is what we 2 ant it to be at toe present i ime." In Moscow, the Soviet Union t eiued 00 Saturday that it military or economic ain in Angola and called for r ie end of foreign armed intcr-ention in the ciul war. The ovie's; indicated in a Pravda l trticle that they do not consid- i T themselves an intervenionist v ut rather as (he loyal support-r.of a faction they consider ptmute t for; detente itself, the t "resident said that it must be ontmucd in best interest of us country and "in the best h ntercsl ot world stability, I rorld peace" i He predicted that the Amen: S an people will: support rather i nan oppose detente when they a good look at its benefits f n Ihe election' campaign of p 976 I think any candidate i 10 says abandon detenle will the loser in the long run." i e said. He explained that Ihe United tates is working with all pow-ra, including the Soviet Union, o try to permit the three groups now '.'en-aged :iri a civil1; war- to a alution "that will reflects view of the Angolaa HP said that effort is being nade with the Soviet Union and tfrican countries ihat are a nart of the Organization of Afr> :aa Unity 1 Moslems Free 24 In _ i f% i I imuiu aturday, freeing 24 -military support efforls in Angola! He made his comments in a 19-minute interview in the Buses BEIRUT. Lebanon (AP) stormed a Lebanese prison with roachine guns and said two of the 15 uards on duty' were wounded uring the 90-minule fight and was believed several raiders ere killed. The 'attack on Seer prison utside [be northern Ixibanese fy ot .Tripoli was the second Us kind in 12 hours.' Gunmen arlier raided a poHce-' station the mountain resort of Aley id escaped with a prisoner ho was awaiting trial on a murder charge. Police said the, 24 who fled rpm the.. -Seer penitentiary ere among 100 who had been ransferrcd there 10 days ago row the Tripoli prison follow-ng o mutiny in which they ried to escape, with the aid of ell-wing Moslem, militiamen. DAWN ATTACK Te 1 e p h on excommunications etween Seer and Tripoli were isrupted after the dawn attack md initial reports -said all 100 f the "transferred inmates escaped. .When service was prison officials said only 24 got away and the others remained in their. cells. There was no official indication why the gunmen staged their attack or what jroup they belonged to, Tlic Tripoli area is run by tim Oct. !4 organization .headed by popu-ist Moslem leader Farouk Mo-raddem. 'Premier Rashid Karami's government' In Beirut has lost much of its sway in the Tripoli region following nine months ol civil war during which Mokad-dem's group has emerged as an effective shadow response, to questions, the President; said flatly; "The Jnited .States is. not training bfeign mercenaries in; Ango-a." His press secretary, Ron Ness en, declined to say Friday whether the United States was .raining 'foreigners for Angolan operations, But .the President continued, 'We do expend some federal funds or United States funds in trying to be 'helpful. Bu we .are not training foreign mercenaries.' PROPER RESPONSIBILITY When asked if this country as financing the training of foreign mercenaries for Angola, "We are working will other countries lhat feel they have an interest in giving the Angolans an opportunity to make the decision for and I think this is a proper responsibility of the fee era! government. Ford said he considers Soviet activities in Angola "inconsist ent with the aims and objectives of FBI Eyes Legal Grounds By KEN DALECKI TIMES Washington Bureau A former i'ayetteville man and his recent iride, are finding it hfcrd to xjlieAe, and more than a little embarrassing, how .they lost heir jobs -at FBI headquarters lece, Joseph 'Guido, 20, a graduate of Fayetteville High iciool, and his wife, Patricia 20, said they were pressed to quit thetr jobs, FBI superiors were informed thai he couple had spent a night ogelher before they were married. Mrs, Gutdo said she quit, her job as an FBI clerk because she: was '-'embarrassed by 'el low em ploy ea asking why she had been "censored" ,by her superiors. She said tbat she and her husband ere now trying :o determine whether lega grounds exist for them to win back their jobs at the FBI headquarters. Meanwhile, -she said that, they are living off their s a rings i n a suburban Virginia apartment. OVERNIGHT SENSATION The Guido vcouple became an overnight sensation after th Washington Post published a s ory about their plight. Within 24 hours of the1 paper story titled "Loving; Couple Lose FB the Guidos have bee interviewed by -radio, televisio' and newspaper representative from as far away as Mrs Guido's hometown of Lo Angeles, Calif. A D.C. television station also -sen trO.YIINUED ON PAGE By DAVID ZODROW TIMES Staff Writer The possibility that one or more of 14 dangerous bridges ould collapse, under the weight of a loaded school bus was dis-ussed Friday at a con crence by County Judge Vol Bridgi Lester called the conference, o "juinoimce that, as a result E a rerent bridge safety hiir vey area s chool bu s drivers vliose routes take Uiem over my of the 14 unsafe bridges villnow be required ti> unload all passengers before' crossing the old steel-span structures. Told id that children riding the ses have to cros the fridges oti foot and reboard on ie other side. 'A survey, by (he 306th Civil ffairs Group oMhe U.S. Army cserve has determined that 14 idges within Washington of age and continued overload conditions mDOsed by-. modern day traffic, re in danger ot collapse. We lave informed Uie schools iiose buses use these bridges lat they will have to use mailer buses on these routes r cross the bridges without assengers to mtet the weight Lester said. Lester said .that, a-67-year-old ridge located near .Furmington nd spanning the Illinois River, about two months ago ndcr L the weight pf: 'a semi-railer truck He explaEneiJ tnat. the steel uperstructure of the old bridge ell on top of thp truck, rushing the cab and sending ie trailer. down into the river. he driver was not injured, .INADEQUATE The 14 bridges which were L-cmed unsafe built around 1908 and are con: scquentlyr inadequate for the arge vehicles in use: today, -ester said. He contended thai another danger was created years ago when a previous county judge ordered concrete cckings poured on many' of tfie iridgcs as substitutes for wooden plankings. ot these concrete [eckings gh a s much as 8 ,0 00 pounds an d I'm s weigh alone overloads the bridges For safety's sake, f have reduced the weight loads to 10 ons on each of the 14 bridges and the speed limit has been reduced toe uniform five miles Lester said. Lcslc said that the old bridges wil lot safely accomodate many o he heavy trucks now using hem and added that -any fur her damage caused to a count: >ridge by an overloaded true will result in- a legal action fo the cost of repairs or replace ment. He said that man nodern -trucks pulling loader railers weigh in excess 'o pounds and thus" caus leavy structural damage to th old bridges. SIGNS POSTED Signs' informing motorists o :he new weight iind speed limil lave been .posted! at the 1 aridges but, have been heavil (CONTINUED, ON PACE JOE SEGERS Segers Will Be Candidate For Circuit Judge Joe Segers, a Fayeiteville-at-orney, announced today that ha will be a candidate for circuit udgc of the newly; create'd econci Division of the Fourth Jud ical District, subject to action of the May 25 Democratic Primaries, Seger.s, 39, is a of he University of Arkansas >chool of Law and has pra'c-iced law in Washington County for the past six years as a member of the firm of -Jones and Segers, He has been active in trial practice. is married to Ihe former Jail Thornton, a teacher at Ramay Junior High School, and i.s the father of three children. Te is a member of the First Jnifed Presbyterian Church, vhere his activities include caching Sunday School. He and iis wife have led the Junior Jigh School Youth Activilles Group of the church. Segers is past president of tha Northwest Arkansas Athletic Official's Association and' Has officiated for football, and baseball games throughout Washington Counly at every level of compeletion. He has practiced law and] [ried cases before all courts of Washington County and from, the Eighth Circuit Cwirt of Ap-ptoas al St. Louis to the Arkansas Supreme Circuit. Suspects LITTLE HOGK Ar-kansas and Oklahoma authorities have issued an.alt-pomts bulletin for two men wanted In the December shooting death of a Springdalo policeman the Arkansas State Police said Saturday Trooper Billy Baler identi fled; the men as Harold Dave Cassell, 28, 'whose nddres; was listed only as of Oklahoma, and Jimmy Lee Robinson, 33, of Arlington, Texas. Baker said the, men were last seen Dec. 19 in Oklahoma City when they purchased a 1S71 station wagon. Cnssell', and "Robinson are sought in the dedlh of officer John whose body was found >vest of Fayetleville Dec, 21. Hussey disappeared afle slopping a van ,on the mor ning of Dec. 21. His anan denied patrol car was founc with hVemergency lights still flashing. His body wo found in rugged terrain nea 'the burned-out wreckage b the van. HI WS i Radio Token The thclt of a Pace 123A citizens; hand radio was eported to Fayelteville police Saturday by James Pi. Boyd of 210 S. School Ave. Boyd said the radio, valued at 5159, along with about five personalized checks, was taken rom 'his pickup parked wt his residence Friday night CB Radio Stolen Steven G. Champlin of 3018 Sheryl Ave., told Fayelteville police Friday night that his Tram Diamond 40 band radio uias stolen from his vehicle -Friday night white it was parked at the Matco Twin on .North College Avenue. The radio, valued at has serial number 12762. Police said that a window on the lelt side of the, vehicle had been broken to gain entry. TV Set Stolen Don Day. the manager of the Ideal" Motel at 402 S. Thompson St., told io ice Friday afternoon that a ,2 incli Motorola black and white television set was stolen 'rom one rooms at the molel on Friday. Santa Missing Mrs. Joyce Claybrook of 1353 Oak Manor -Drive told Fayet-teville police Saturday that a plastic inflatible Santa Glaus, valued at was stolen from her front porch Thursday night. Denial Issued WASHINGTON, f AP) A CO editor of 'Counterspy1 cot cedes the publication of CIA station chief Richard S. Welch' name could have figured in hi assassination in Greece, but h denies any direct DIDN'T SEND IN ENTRY Mrs. Alice Ross o Greenland, a regular con test-ant in the TIME Prizeword Puzzle Contes almost didn't bother to enle last week's event. But in th ..end she, did, and "won in cash. The story of how Mrs, Ros did it, and what she and he husband plan to do with th money, appears on page Delayed MERCURY, Nev. The first scheduled unter-ground nuclear test of the new year was delayed indefinitely Saturday because .of uncertain winds above the Nevada Tes Site. The massive wcapons-relaler lest, which will have 'a yield o between anti 1 mtllior tons of TNT, had been sched uled for Dec. 29 but ,was de layed'duc to Ihe weather, salt Dave Miller, spokesman for tht Energy Research and Develop ment Administration, i Items Stolen The theft of. a citizens bam radio and a box of mirror tile was reported to police. Friday night-by Harol Jones of 1617 Ramsey Drive. Jones -said that his Realist' CB radio nnd Ihe box of mirro srj'jares, both valued at were taken from his vehic parked at the Elks Ixjdgo o Zion Road Friday night. Police said a vent window -had bee broken to'galn entry.; of, today's Cubans For gelher as the 'Jose Marti Inter national' But, in an> case, they will go lo Angola." The AP disclosed the Prat Martinez operation tins pas week. As a result, several exil leaders in Minmi have criti 5 clzed the recruiting campaign 1 saying .in effect that if Cuban r wanted; to. tight Communist they should do it in Cuba. a just not possible a i- this Prat said In re spouse Saturday. "The U.S government has closed up thos opportunities., UNITA nov r makes it possible for us to flgh i Communists. We are not onl t against Fidel Castro. Our eru i my is Communism everywhere i- "And when do the job Angola, we will have a stron force and international backn to fight in Cuba. This is a b opportunity." They pointed out .to crili (lhat a number of Cuban exil were used as advisers and e gaged in fighting in the Cong 5 in the mid-19GQs. i Martinez emphasized (he were "in no way connecter t wilh the American governmen Ihe CIA or American industr Not lhat we have any animosi B toward them, it's just that this particular case, we ha 1 no contact with them." y The two Cubans said th r wort: through an orfianiwli in Ihe United States, which the n refused to t UNITA is the National Unior for .the Total Independence o s Angola, one of two Western supported factions battling ,th Soviet-backed Popular Move j ment for the Liberation of An gola (MPLA) for control of nation which recently achieve! its independence from Portu i gal. .V-J n Fighting alongside the raliv n troops are more than Cu ban Communist soldiers, ac cording to U.S. 'State 'Depar 3 ment sources. "Eighty-five per ccr.L- .of ou d people are Cuban sai n Martinez. "We are hoping tha e the UNITA officials allow then to remain together, to fight mfammftmmmmmwimwm Inside Sum) From The Reader's VI p American Issues. Forum 'Annual Charily Ball Pla Quietly Mostly About Books Editorial A'.; K For Women 9-11 i i -BilmaiiiiiaiiBMHiiiiiiiBnBiimiiiiMiiiHiaiiMiiBiiHi Gtfs TIMES ypoint i. 5. tined i .9. IB Crossword. Puzzle Classified NV Notice i recruiting exiles t fight as volunteer soldier against Communiat-supportet troops in "Angola said Saturda they 'have 365 men ready, to b airlifted to Africa.. "We plan lo begin movm (hem -out in about a week, said Pedro Martinez. He an Jose Antonio Prat' have bee busy signing up volunteers'1 i the Miami; New York and Ch. cago areas for several weeks, "We have 922 application from Latins who want to go, Martinez fold The Associate Press. "Of these, 562 have bee okayed by UNITA, 365 Fair and cold through tbnlgh increasing cloudiness and warm Monday.: Highs today nea 30 wilh lows tonight 15 to 2 High Monday, near :40, Suns today Sunrise Monday Weather map on paga Circuit Court was created by the last Legislature because of the heavy. case load in the county. The post is now held by Judge John LIneberger, who was' appointed by '.G6v-. David Pry or to serve- until Ihte first general election. Linebe'r-ger, as an wnhot succeed himselt.   

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