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Northwest Arkansas Times Newspaper Archive: August 25, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Northwest Arkansas Times

Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas

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   Northwest Arkansas Times (Newspaper) - August 25, 1962, Fayetteville, Arkansas                               MORTHWHT ARKANSAS' 1ST (ALISMAM The Public Interest Is The First Concern Of This Newspaper LOCAL FORECAST- Hwmrtf Vtttw Clear and mild, cooler today, warmer Sunday. Barometer, 30.18 urn! rising; high yesterday 82; low last night 64; wind NNW and calm; precipitation (last 24 hours) .20; humidity 82 per rent; 88 to- day; low tonight 82. 103rd YEAR-NUMBER 62 Associated Preji Leased Wire FAYETTEVILLE, ARK., SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1962 AP, King and NEA Features 16 PAGES-FIVE CENTS University Chorus Wins International Laurels Fom Here To Victory... Via Paris, Dijon, Zurich, Venice Schola Cantorum (Editor's Note: Margo Wil- liams of Harrison, a Journal- ism student and a munbcr of tin; University of Arkansas' Schola Cantorum, which yes- terday won first place In the International Polyphonic Com- petition at Arezzo, Italy {Aug. 23-20 has written the follow- ing report on the trip.) By MAKCO WILLIAMS LUGANO, Italy The Uni- versity of Arkansas Schola Can- tonnns' bus driver is French, and he seems constantly amused at the antics of the .15 young Americans who have been riding behind him across Eu- rope, It is diflicult for 1iim to un- derstand oui excitement as we travel because be feels that every day away from Paris is The Schoia Cantorum left Paris Aug. 8 and arrived at Dijon thai evening. Meals at Dijoii, sometimes called the cul- inary capital of the world, are excellent. Tin- French have ons of ways of preparing pota- toes, wlr.ch are more often than not a parl of the main course. The French serve in courses, the first ol which is usually soup with bread added for dunking. Samd, usually lettuce and vine- gar and oil, follows the soup, aiici Hit main course follows the salad. Finally, a dessert of ci- ther fruit and cheese or ice cream is served. Tourists who visit Franco can cxiicot to spend an hour and a hulf at tire evening meal. Meals there arc .served and eaten slowly. Though we had hoped to re- hearse in Ihs cathedra! at Dijon, arrangements could not be made to do so. Instead we went through our numbers in a mu- seum court yard. Passers-by stopped and listened in amaze- ment at flte music coming from behind those ancient walls. We left Dijon Aug. 9 for Gene- va The drive through t h e French Alps was thrilling, and we wore impressed will) tlio city of Geneva, surely one of the cleanest places on earth. Gene- va is dotted with parks and gar- tens, a lucl thai has prompted sonic to observe "European cities have parks where Ameri- can cities 'lave parking lots." On Aug. 10 we rehearsed at Saint S ul pice, Switzerland, drove through Bern, the capital of Switzerland, and Zurich and arrived at Huttin on Aug. II. Wo attended church services there the next day, and on Sun- day afternoon gave a conceit in a park near Zurich. That eve- ning, the Schola members were guests at a dinner given by the management of a group of Swiss chain stores. The dinner began at aiut ended at 10. It was very elaborate, and probably the finest meal we've had so far. On Aug. 13, while some mem- bers of UK choir wcnl shopping at Zurich, others tried their hand at mountain climbing. Wc left Hutlin Aug. 14 and held our breaths as our bus driver picked his way along the narrow roads through the moun- tains At limes, because the cinvo.s in live road were so sharp, the driver had to back up mid cast forward again to get the bus around them. As we came down the moun- tains and approached Lugano, the became much warmer Wc gave an evening concert there Aug. 14, and it drew a good crowd. This dispatch is being written Aua, 15. II is raining and we plan to spend the day at the hotel he'c before leaving for Venice tomorrow. Comfortable? Of course, In fact, it's almost like being in one of the University's residence halls. There's little doubt that American influence preceded us here: There's a juke box on the first floor. Cuban Dictator Claims U. S. Responsible Havana Shelled By Ships, Castro Says HAVANA from ciK'my vessels standing off Hava- na damaged several buildings in Friday night, Fidel Castro charged today, lie blamed the United Stales. Tlw shooting was reported to have lasted six or seven minutes. a westei'n suburb Prime .Minister There was no mention of casual- ties, but Havana newspapers played up pictures of damaged buildings. The general slaff called all de- mobilized antiaircraft artillery- men to report at the university stadium at 8 a.m. Sunday. "We hold the United States gov- ernment responsible for this newj and cowardly attack on our coun-' Castro said in a communi- que. He did not specify the nation- ality of the attackers. Armed ships made the attack oil the suburb of Miramar at p.m., he said, with "numer- ous 20-caliber (correct) cannon] :irings." (The "20-ealiber" desig- nation apparently was an incor- reel reference to 20-millimeter ;uns, which have a bore of slight- ly more than of an inch.) A hotel, Havana's largest theater and "several homes, received numerous it TOUGH underestimate the power of a woman, particularly when she's a he and a policeman to boot. New York Patrolman Robert Crow- Icy, dressed an a bobbysoxer, holds a knife taken from a mugging suspect he said attacked him in Central Park. Crowley, six-foot 200-poundcr, was one of ten husky policemen in women's garb who helped launch a new drive on street crime. Runaway Heating-Gas Truck Smashes Into Rest Home; 3 Die Venus Rocket Countdown Is Under Way CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) American scientists plan to launch a Mariner 2 spacecraft to ward Venus early Sunday to probe secrets of the far-away planet. Sometime in a three-hour period after midnight, a powerful Atlas- Agena B rocket is scheduled to roar skyward to start Hie 447 pound gold and-silver plated pay- load on an intended 182 million- mile trip. The Venus shot is Ihe first of four major .satellite launchings in the next five weeks and five more lictore the end of the year planned by tile National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The other major launchings be- fore Oct. 1, disclosed in a confi- dential flight schedule listed in an NASA booklet called "Pocket Sta- tistics, include Ihe proposed six- orbil Mercury satellite flight of astronaut Walter M. Sehirra, planned for late September; a 150- pound Relay communications sat- and another Telstar satel- Amcricnn Telephone and Tele- graph Co. is financing the Tclslar project. Relay, like Telstar, is de- signed to orbit between 500 and 3.000 miles, transmitting commu- nications on a global basis. It is a NASA .satellite built by Radio Corp. of America. The' later launchings listed by the booklet include a Ranger craft to lake pictures of (he moon and lo land an instrument package on the moon; another Tiros weather satellite, another Relay launching and Iwo more Telstars. The schedule also calls for an- other high-allilude inflation test of n 135-foot diameler Echo-type bal- loon, and a tviird sub-orbital launching of a million-pound- I'D TAKE OFF IF I CUD The age of aeronautics was confronted with an ancient problem at Fayettcvillc's Drake Field early this morning: cows blocking traffic. While the pilot of a small private airplane drummed his fingers on the controls, waiting for clearance to take off, air- port officials called city police to complain of a small herd of cows on their runway. The police found the owner of a farm adjacent to the air- strip, and suggested a roundup. The animals had gotten Ilirough a fence. Firs! From U. S. To Earn Award AREZZO, Italy (AP) The Schola Cantoiiim of the University of Arkansas sang ils way to first place Friday night in She -ID-voiced nixed chorus class at the Gukto d'Arezzo International Polyphonic competition. Tlx; Fayclleville, Ark., group was directed by Richard Brothers and tKlged out La Psalcttc d'Orleans, of Orleans, France. In third was the (I. Tardini Choral Society of Trieste, Italy. First prize money won by the Arkansas group was lire (5480) which will be awarded by President Antonio Segni and Premier Amintore Fanfani Sunday night at the Petrarch Theater in Arozzo. The Arkansans, who left the United States Aug. 1, have sung in Paris, Geneva, Zurich, Lugano and Rome. The University group was one of 27 entered in the international went on. The liolcl is the one belonging competition and the victory Cities In Area To Get Awards For Achievements Several Northwest Arkansas cities will bo among 2t communi- ties in the state to be honored Aug- ust HI for outstanding community achievement during Awards of Merit 1961, will be sented, in the form of plaques, to Brntonvillc, pre- bronze Berry- .0 the Cuba Peoples' Friendship Institute, formerly live Rosita de Horncdo, a 175-room hostel now used mainly to house Hast Euro- pean technicians. The communique continued: The attackers also shelled the Chaplin Theater, formerly the Blanquila, site of some of Cas- tro's flashiest television speeches. "The surprising and treacher- ous attack reveals the cowardice and criminal and piratical spirit of its authors, Hie United States government and mercenary agents recruited and armed by it, who act with impunity from Flor- ida shores. "Cuba warns the United States President that our jwople have adopted all necessary measures to confront danger... .The Cuban revolution will be able to resist and reject a direct attack, too. Castro's communique said the raiders slipped up to within ap- proximately five-eighths of a mile of the coast before opening fire Nearby residents said there 'nac been no fire during the night from guns permanently emplaced al the water's edge in the neighbor hood. Miraramar is a suburb of tree litwd streets where former homes of well-heeled Cubans now house scholarship holders brought to Ma vana by the government. It is also a favorite residential area ol many diplomats and other for- eigners. Castro's communique was fea- tured on front pages of Havana newspapers under big headlines. The 250-word statement did not roporl what happened to the raid- ers or say whether there were any casualties ashore. In Miami, the Directorio Rev- ever achieved by an American group. The Schola Cantorum entry in he contest and subsequent toui through Europe lo Italy was fi- nanced by contributions from Ar kansas residenls. Competition in various classes extends through Sunday. CATHEDRAL AT AUXERRE, FRANCE U.A. chorus pays It a visit But Officials Think Tension Easing Shots Ring Out In Berlin BERLIN (AP) Wild shooting along Berlin's ap- parently hurt no this divided city on the alert for fresh trouble today. But U.S. officials In Washington were reported confident, barring new outbreaks of violence such as the anti-Soviet riots in West Ber- lin earlier in Ihe week, that the peak of tension has passed for the lime being. West Berlin police reports in- dicated about 100 shots were ville. Decatur, Harrison and Si- loam Springs. Each award winner was judged on the basis of an inventory of community needs, a long-range program of goals and a 1061 pro- gram of work, bolh tailored to Ihe inventory of needs: degree of com- pletion of Ihe IDfil work program, and ils value lo the city. The 12lh annual Community Do-j vclopmont Awards Luncheon will credit for the bombardment in a printed news release. The group said two vessels, mounting more (ban 40 cannon, destroyed the hotel where Ihe Rod lerimicians were housed. Simultaneously, the release said, CAR BRUISES GIRL, TREE RUMPLES CAR A runaway automobile knocked its driver down yesterday, ac- cording to the city police department's 503th accident report of the year. Officers said Miss Reba Lou Eastcvling, 17, of fit. 2, Fayctleville had parked her family's 1961 Chevrolet at the corner of Rollston and Lafayette Streets when it began rolling down Rollston. Miss Easterling, who had gone only a few feel from the parking place, tried to gel in the car and slop it. She was sent sprawling, and the car smashed into a tree. fired from the Communist side of the wall in four different places during the night. Some of the shooting probably was aimed "20-year-old sol- dier of the East German People's Army who reached West Berlin at a.m. He was unhurt. Only 35 minutes later, about a mile away, West Berlin police looked on helplessly while East German police fired at a man trying lo swim the Landwehr Canal to West Berlin. He was hauled into an East Berlin police boat only about 10 yards from the West Berlin bank. Apparently he was not hurt cither. Earlier, West Berlin police, watching through binoculars, saw a man of about 40 being arrested on the other side of the wall and taken away in a truck. Moscow newspapers criticized The girl suffered bruises on the forehead and on one hand, but western powers for a was not believed seriously hurt. House Space Panel Chief Says Red Twin Orbit Feat No Reason To Panic WASHINGTON (AP) Tho'tyecl ior any radical change in the chairman of the House space program. Committee today measured Rus-j The prime contract for the S500- sia's orbiting of twin cosmonauts million Titan III, a combination .'against U.S. space achievements anti-Castro activity increased the Kscambray Mountains. and concluded there is no reason deaf ear to Soviet Premier Khrush- chev's plans for a demilitarized West Berlin. A Pravda writer warned tha' those who tlirealen to draw the sword in the event of the signing of a Soviet-East German peace treaty may "per- ish by Ihe sword." Krasnaya Zvcsda (Red Star) in like vein quoted Soviet scientists as saying lhal while rockets thai launched Soviet cosmonauts into space were moan! for peace thev solid and liquid fueled booster, i could be used for military pur- was awarded just the other day. jposes. It is slalcd lo go into operation Berlin Mayor Friedrich. in late 1116-1 or early 1985. jEbert. in an editorial in the Com- Of Russia's doub'o Miller Neues Deutsch- be held at the Hotel Marion in Lit- tle Rock August .11. Awards will be said the Western presented by Pat Wilson of .lack- sonville. president of Ihe Arkansas State Chamber of Commerce, who will serve as master of cere-U The shooting damaged nine! !rooms in Hie hotel Iho Havana)   newspaper llov said ;lot tllis Rep. Coorgej H carried p- R-Calif.. said an in- said. "I! was pretty tricky. sala lne western powers 'honiiv Russja.s accom Bm ]IC .war-won rights in Berlin already were "a fig leaf punched full of holes." He repealed the standard Com- munist demand that the Western powers withdraw and leave West Berlin a "neutral, demilitarized what it said were "Yankee; bulleis" shattered min PLECTRA. Tex. runa-j way heating-gas truck, abandoned by ils driver after bursting into crashed inlo a rest home Friday, selling off an inferno lhat killed three elderly palicnts. "It was just like a lighted lorcvi spewing a stream of lire in the front the rest home opera- tor said of Ihe butane truck that slammed inlo the entrance. About 35 bedridden or menial palients in the Hillcrcst Haven rest liome were rescued. One suf- fered slight injuries. The throe that died perished In flames that swept the modem, one-story structure and caused an estimated damage. Klivlra is a city of about 5.000. Wichita Falls in norlh Texas. Walter Blovins, co-owner and operator of the rest home, said he saw the truck coming down Ihe road, "Everything happened so fast located 28 miles northwest of I stopped. lhat the next thing I know Hie track was in the front of the building. Everyone thai was evac- uated was evacuated in less than 15 minulc.s before the flames and heat became he said. Witnesses said Ihe driver of Ihe truck, Dan Craighcad. 22, of Elcc- lia, leaped from the vehicle as 11 nearrd Ihe rest home. It caught fire 2 miles away, Sheriff Hani Vance said. TSiero was no explanation why it could not be thrust Saturn C-l rocket "before the end of Ihe year. NASA officials declined lo com- jment Friday on the listings in the booklet. The publication said lhat "II is NASA's policy to do first and talk lalcr." If Mariner 2 successfully com- pletes a scries of tricky midcourst maneuvers, it will streak wilhin IC.UI'O miles of Venus on Dec. H and electronic instruments will seek to unlock mysteries which are masked by a perpetual mantle ol heavy clouds around Ihe planet, and radio its findings back to oarlli. andiment was pulling t'ne two men -phcy did not show thai they doors. bringing them close a booster than before. Another picture showed a ho said. vehicles were about Hip same beneath a window sill. On a near-' "They're well ahead in that as their earlier ships. The by bed, Hoy saict. two children Israel But wo can meet that in a i orbits weren't any higher than and escaped death when couple of years. We'll be previous ones." illets ricocheted into the coiling. when Titan III is "There's no place for compla- i The attack lasted "six or seven'added. jcency." he .said, "but we haven't Arkansas City. Uionc-j millules according to (hotel) cm-i Miller disclaims any special] panicked." guests and some 60 i knowledge of astronautics. But1 In purely scientific aspects ofj state included among the 21 win-1 Hober Springs. Hope. Marianna, Marked Treo, Murfrcesboro, New- port, Piggotl, Pocanontas. Star City, Trumann and Walnut Ridge. Pea Ridge Youth Hurt In Smashup ROGERS (Special) A Pea Ridge youlh was seriously injured last night when the car which he was driving traveled 643 feet off Hwy. 94 at the Sugar Creek curve. James Dale Mills, 19. was taken to Rogers Memorial Hospital ARKANSAS WEATHER 'about 10 p.m. yesterday suffering ARKANSAS Partly cloudy lo cloudy and cooler this afternoon and lonight with a few showers and thuixlershowcrs likely in the' huUe Leon Clinlon said severe injuries. This morning he was transferred lo a Fort Smit hospital oast this afternoon. Sun- day clear lo partly cloudy and pleasant. Low tonight 56 to 68. High Sunday 85 to 93, Mills apparently lost conlrol of his automobile on the curve. Several tree limbs were broken off by the car as it bounced across a field at the scene of fnc accident. shots were fired." Hoy said. Shortly after me raid, showed up at Ihe hotel. Simultaneously today the armed forces ministry denounced what it called two further air space violalions by "North American planes." Tlie.se. the stalcnynt (CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO] ibis commiltec authorizes I he [space exploration, Miller said he. Castro! money each year for the National! is convinced the Slates 'Aeronautics and Space Adminis-pleading, and lhat European scien- Iration, which runs Iho U.S. space program. As chairman, he is kept well in formed by file men in government tists he has talked to toll him the! Nike Zeus Test Flops same thins. the kn'W most about the U.S.-jhaven't Jan space race, and sees In military field, Ihoro POINT MUGU. Calif. Most Of Striking Space Workers Back On Job antimissic rocket was Polaris Mibmarku's. by an automatic safely lulled too ho! device Friday after ils critical third stage veered off course. ----------------------..........-----1 The third stage, capable of propelling :i nuclear warhead, did not any explosive in Friday's lost of Ihe -IS-fool, solid-fuel rock- HUNTSVIU.K. Ala. (AP) Eighty-six per cent of the pro- slrike work force was back at work at Redstone Arsenal Friday, a Marshall Space Flighl Center spokesman said. let. Eighty-two por cent of the clcc-j president of the union. The Army termed Ihe oiicralion Iricians. who started the More Iban 1.200 members of: "partially successful" became the "We were at work Friday, compared with abaul 33 per cent Thursday, the spokesman said. James Haygood, business agent to be in full for 558 of Ihe lnlernalion.il operation b; addod. Brotherhood of electrical work- President Kennedy's Missilcjcrs. said lip ordered memljors Sites Labor Commission has a'Thursday night to go back to Ihcir hearing scheduled Monday on the Jobs. He said hc also road back-lagainsl llul Friday was dispute lhal starlpd a work slop- j to-work orders from a federablho firs! substantial lumoul of other building trades unions re- rocket maneuvered spectacularly fused lo cross picket lines set upion command during its first two by electricians, in opposition high over Iho Pacific. use of non-union workers by I and altitudes were not Baroco F.lcclrical Construction! disclosed. Co.. a subcontractor. The finned while Nike Zens, Some workmen i elurnod lo work [most advanced of Ihis nation's anlimissile .systems, Is designed, Monday aflci a federal order page here Aug. H. Icourt judge aivJ the intoinalionallek'clricians. when perfected, to intercept j 000-mile an liour -warheads at I heights of 100 miles or more.   

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