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Fayetteville Daily Democrat Newspaper Archive: March 13, 1937 - Page 4

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   Fayetteville Daily Democrat (Newspaper) - March 13, 1937, Fayetteville, Arkansas                               Pa2e Four (AUK.) DAILY DI-MOCKAT Sat., March 13, 1037 PORKER MENTOR WORRIED OVER HIS RESERVES Third Week of Off-Season Gridiron Drills End; Thomsen. Comments Hy JIM B01IART Conch Fred C. Thomsen ox- pressed concern loday over his re- serve prospects but admitted the University of Arkansas hacks should be a .swell football learn to watch next full. "The team that keeps them from scoring will huve a great Thomsen said of his Southwest conference champions as they end- id the third week of a 30-day .spring gridiron practice period. "The Southwest conference foot ball championship has never beei won twice in a row by the sam commented the Porkc: mentor, "but the liazorback: should come mighty, mighty closi even if they don't win the title next fall." Forty candidates for the 103 squad greeted Thomsen when hi. started off-season workouts late in February. Ten additional per- formers from the varsity am freshman basketball rosters were added later. A big smile playec over the Porker coach's face as lie watched four complete elevens ii: .signal drills. "That's he remarked. "A coach couldn't ask for a great deal more, especially when nearly every player has a winning spir- it." iBut everything probably will not turn out a bed of roses for the Raxorbacks. The coaching staff is on the lookout for capable reserves at every line position. Two consistent starters, Captain and Tackle Clifford Van Sickle and Guard Percy Sanders, gradu- ated from the forward wall. Ken- neth Lunday, the big and fast center, also finished his eligibility. Randall Stallings, rangy 1SIO- pounder, was understudy to Von Sickle last fall and appears to have the inside track for a start- ing post. Lunday Corbelt, giant veteran tackle whose legs are get- ting stronger all the time, has been sparkling in workouts and may divide one of the starting jobs. Harold Wentz, big trans- fer from Arkansas Tech, also has been showing up well. Ed Lai- man, regular left tackle, last. fall, has 'two more years of eligiCility. Lunday divided starting duty on last fall's championship eleven with Lloyd Woodell, the FIRST BROKEN NOSE Slevo O'Neill explains us Hiifcliesi IK hurt First casualty of the baseball sonsnn ts recorded at New Orleans, training of (he Cleveland Indlarm, as a liner from Uif bat uf. Manager Steve O'Neill smacks Roy Hughes, fnflelder. on the nose. reuniting1 In a triple fracture. Hughtta its expected to be out several dayd. In the photo above, O'Neill, k-ft, la snowing some of his play- how he wiuf hit on arm aa Hughes Ueiuls over with severe pain. (Jrtittal 1'rcsa Alan Gould Outlines Decline Of Madison Square Garden As Leading Spot for Boxing Bouts lional sophomore. Wuodell la i-cady to start in uvvry twine- bar- ring injuries and illness. lie should be better tliun ever with n' season's experience behind him. Although no team in the nation is expeeted lo have better winn- men to place in the lineups than Jim Benton and Ray Hamilton or n better lirsl call reserve than Na- fhan Gordon, Thumsen said he "did not expect this trio to curry the entire load next fail." Jack Holt has been .shitted from fullback to end, Zui-k Smith, Dudley Mayes und A. J. Yates, all freshmen last fall, are leading Ihe pack for other reserve jobs. Thomsen is worried about reserve ends and injury to any of the wing stars would plans. upset all his Reserve guards to help Drew Martin give assistance to George Gilmorc and B. A. Owen, tabbed as starters, also arc needed. Gil- more and Owen, the latter a place kicking star, divided right guard labors last but the Jor- mer has been shifted to left guard. James Maugerl is the best look- ing newcomer al guard. Ralph Atwood, a .speed mer- chant, Kay Eakins, big and run- By, and Ray Cole, Husky and stocky, have been outstanding among the new buckfield candi- dotes. Atwood is considered the best ball messenger prospect since "Cowboy" Kyle. Eakins should see a lot of action next fall and might even step into Jack Rob- bins' post after the grout uU-cun- i ference back graduates next year. Cole might solve the starling full- back worries. "Atwood is the fastest bull car- rier I've seen in a Razorback uni- form in several declared Thomson. tricky ibitUng "i the line on quick opening plays i and always tries for that yard even with his 150 pounds." Dwight Sloan, who lowed the .pass that beat Texas and won tho 3936 championship, is working a.s hard in the off-senson drills as any of the rookies, and, appears lo be even a better ball tosscr thL> spring than last fall when the Jlazorbacks threw more pusses lhan. any other team in the coun- 'iry. Thomsen .summed up the sllmi- tioh; "I'm worried about the full- (What's behind the current heavyweight fistic furor? Who's who ant! why since Tex Rk'k- fird ruli-'ri thu boxing busiiiui-H. The; answer In those and other questions arising from latest de- velopments in the science of siTiimbled cars will be found in a series of Associated Press slorieH. of which this is tin.1 first) Ry ALAN GOULD New York, March 13 Noth- ing could re-voiil more? strikingly Iho shift in heavyweight fistiana's "balance of power" than thu prosenl setup for the Jim Brad- dock-Joe Louis title match in Chicago, with llin Madison Square 'built the- Lotiis-Baor figlll into Ihe first million-dollar match of the :posl-dfpi ession era. In IDIili, the Garden was "shut out" complete- ly, with Jacobs' syndicate pro- moting the year's big match, Schmcling-Louis, and the original plans for a Uriidduck-Kchmi'linK match in September collapsing. Organized Clubs Sign 45 of- Doan's Students Garden Corporation on tho outside for the first time since the late Crcorfjf Lewis (Tux) Kk-kard in- k'resU'd struct in pugilistic playthings. The Garden still has the privi- lege of a few legal punch- es in behalf of its contract for Braddock to fighl Max Sclum-ling for the title in New York June The- Garden's i-hh-f executive. John Kci'd Kilpatrick, an ohl Yale insisls ho will fighl U) the finish to the Chicago match. Meantime, and despite the- novel Hot Springs, March 13 demand for young material in or- ganized baseball has resulted in signing 45 students from Hoi Springs' annual baseball college for tryouLs this spring. ManaRcr Rogers Hoinsby took two players to lire St. Louis Browns' training camp at San An- liinlo. The Abbcyvillc, La., club of the Kvunfieline class D circuit an entire club of nine players, including the battery. Several minor league presidents arc due hei c next week to look ovcr umpire prospects. Numer- ous scouts of major and minor league clubs have paid the school a visit on their search for talent. Some were impressed. The school has been divided efforts of SchmeluiK himself lo inlu ('hlus in Uvn ing fight nine-inning yaines daily. Instructors explained this gives the .students a chance to develop and .show what they can do under lire. The school closes March 29. promote a title fight wilh lirad- dock this year in Berlin, the mul- tiple, interests backing the Chica- go bout are goinn right ahead case (a) I hoy have the inside track, and (b) they know they have tho biggest money-maker available. All of which, my clear Watson, means that Madison Square Gar- den, having already lost Rickard, most of the- original million- aires." and much of its old fistic prestige, now seemingly lias lost its exclusive hold on the heavy- weight industry, including the titloholder. This is significant along Cauliflower Alley, oven though it hardly calls for an amendment to the constitution. Tho blow is more severe to the Garden's pride than to its bal- ance sheet. IJoxing nowadays comprises lhan five per cent of the GUI (ton's financial opera- tions, clue not alone lo the decline of its fistic interests, but also to a policy of building up prestige in heavyweight F.irmington High Loses In State AAU Tourney Littlo Hock. March 13 vancing through first round play on a forfeit from Columbus, the defending champion Union high Cyclones of tvoar Kl Dorado faced their first tost in the high school division of the stale A.A.U. girls tournament loday against Stutt- gart. runner-up last year, drew the toughest assignment of Uu.' quarterfinal round in the strong Klippin sextet to which 'boiutts only Jour lossos U years of -competition. Turrell is match- cd! witli li'inmelt and St. Mary's of Little Hock with Kensctt. Fin- ithor spheres of sport. -First round scores: Bradley 42 The Great Kickard, novoi the. j Knux '21; Klippin 37, Jack- less, wmilcl havt- "seed nulhm'l M'imllf 11; Tunx-ll 27. Fanning- it." if he could return today Kmniolt 21, Lonsdale lo find his Imlding an pt- Mary's 28, Coal Hill 2ii, Sluli- apparontl.v wurtliless ciuitract MisMlvillf 21.' tho next heavyweight title figlil.f leiims tne while rivals go forwanl Unrtepend ut division. First round wilh for a chain-1 icocos: Jaski-tocrs of Little Hock pionship match in Chicago, scene j 1Jllt'1-0 Si- Mary's Alumnae of Tox's If; 27, Balil Knobl.V, Sylvan Hills, bye. Semi- Tho twin answers to the don's present pliglil cinnpriso (a) j failure to prevent rivals from j getting mntrn] of the central tig-' ure in heavyweight bn> covei'y, Louis, ami decision of Champion Braddnck I Sylvan Hills; .back post and the reserve pros- his j. Missouri V.illcy Tennis (b) Ihej I OUl'ney for fc.1 Dorado pects on the ends, at the tackles and the middle of the line." Viewing next fall's campaign: j "Championships are won during the season by winning one game a time." mcnt to fisht first under Oiirdni ,R) (.lvThe auspices in d'-rense of the lille. The pietensc "hat the Chicago fight does nol provide for Iho cham- pionship being at stake is sheer hokum, even though il may serve BROWNS FUNEKAL SUNDAY Clarksville, March .1.1 'neral services will be conducted ;ul 2 p.m. tomorrow in the Hay- linond Munger Memorial Chapel Edgar O. Brown, College of the Ozarks athletic dirt-dor, who died Thursday nishl. The bicycle is said to be coming whi.-n it hus.t never i Sway, ;..........._ the jmrpnse of a legal 1'Hipholc. The G.'irdon trird hard to land (in- "eastern to Louis m While llio dickeiing was in progress. Michael Slnmss Jac.ibs, Hj-o.-ifiv.'a.v broker ariil ally of Uickard, cxn-tittti a flank movement -'ind plucked Lnuir; Iri'i-. Tlii'-c inoMihs altei1 Ihe b.tri-Jy diaiio expenses witli UK? JJrudUuck-lJaer title -jo, Jncobj tennis champion- ships will be played at the 101 Dorado- Tennis Club, Kl Dorado, Ark., din-ing the week ol June 11, Karl Hodge, chairman n of js.mclion> and schedule rummittoe j of liie Missouri Valley Tennis a.s- .socialIDII. announced Unlay. j TournamoiU (-vents will include singles arid doubles, wo- junior SlfiN'S CONTKACT lll.'il! (ivilfieldc-r willi Beais, senl in his contract today and ended a brief Handicap On Oaklawn Card Today- Hot Spring. March 13 SI.000 Kaslinan (Hotels i feature of an eight-page program, attracted a field of H sprinters] ,-it Oaklawn Park today. Morning Mail, five year gelding owned by K. Oiw. Hot Springs, was out for his thin: victory in Ihf fifl'i run.- over the Oakla'.vn course'. Adding brilliance to the field were Bright and Early and Gal- licne. two sprinters that won their last limes out on the Oakhnvn track, Prince Fox, with victories last .summer on the Texas tracks and Trans mutable, who has been showing good .speed for a half- mile here this season. Appealing, four year old colt of the Motor City stable, was awarded top weight of 11 ti pounds becau.se of his. fine showing last a iv Prince Ballot, 5 year old brown gelding, found tlie heavy track to iii.s liking yesterday to come home iihcari of Black Scout and Nawab in the fifth race over a mile yes- terday. A favorite, Price Ballot. iaid A crowd of paid through the mutuel win- .iows. Try a Want Ail in The Democrat CARNEGIE TECH'S NEW Hill Kmi President Robert E. Dolierty Carnegie Tech's ntiv head football coach, Bill Kern, former assistant Iq Howard 1-larpster, is seen at the left in this picture heing wished success by President Robert 10. Doherty of Tech. LT E R S. CHA1TEK 41! OOUNDALE listened to Sel- den's suggestions that lie marry in ill-concealed anger. "It's all right for you to talk in that phari.saical manner, and 1 suppo.sc you think you have got me now. Confound that woman! It was she who suggested this, and it wasn't blackmail, you ought to know that." "Don't Selden said stern- ly. "It was not only blackmail, but conniving ut a felony, for you promised to keep your knowledge to yourself if lie made that grant. Now what is it to be-----" "We can't live without Colindale grumbled. "Lady Severinge has some of her own, and 1 promise that she shall receive an allowance. I will guar- antee you that." "How can Colmdah: be- gan, but the look he saw on Si'l- den'.i fiien caused him to refrain From further argument. "I infant to take her he protested. "I told her HO Uila mowing. If .she will go with me. I'll clear out of this cheery place." "I'll give you half an hour, not a minute more." Colindale wheeled round without nnnlhcr word and went from tin: room. Selden watched him go with u curious smile on Iris face. When Selden left James1 room some littlt- time afterwards he was besieged by the frightened .ser- vants. Tin; depflrllire of Mrs. i Thornton and the arrest of the butler had knocked the bottom out j of the staff, coming as it did after then spoke. "Well, I think bo much better if.vou cnuht. tell u-; old enough to share our the events of the night. Selden did his best to reassure councils. It. is no use trying to them, but when they heard ttmt hide things from them now." Ijuiy Sevt'i-inge was going as well j The children seated Ihi-msL-Ivcs they KiarU'd to pack like fright- on each side (if Itcid on the cmirb, eni'il shuep. They would not stay I UK though :ilmut to Nairn to snine auuUu-r hour in the place, lexcitinj; i'niry talc. SeltU-n told them tlutj. if they! "I've souir nrwu for you. aeemniL nut, whatever yon tVll tlmt, they hail hf-tte.r pack JFir.st. I.iitly .Severing- tlt-rioVd Kijbi-ar." H" to t vvir Vm what they wanted for immediat the reason." '1 promise you thai thi.s Is a temporary arrangement for one night only. Hut this evening you must he in hot ore dark, and lor It the place up caivi'iilly. HHil ,you can't hi- too careful. nflV have hi ok I'M and looked at the lowerii needs, and leave the rest, as iK-jilown nnuVr strain was certain they would be return- few days. She has in a tew days. He watcliiHl from tho study window as Colin- dale drove slowly down the drive wilh Hilda, and then the servants' exodus! He took the key which he f ihf last for a holi- sky. Sylvia looked up with a look of disapproval, but Joan solemnly said. are going to get muiTlfd. We both thought so. had got from James' room, and jbut they might have askrd locked the great doors of the gate- 'wanted to be bridesmaids." is. Wt way, char returning to Keid and his "Cold-blooded little ruflluns." cs. i SeWen with a smile that look i the sting from the words. "James has been arrested for the murder of Sir Henry." ficid started at the quiet unemo- tional way in which the detective i Reid had remained with Sylvia and the twins in the library at Selden's instructions. The girl had cooked a breakfast over the tire, for no one had come near them, and the house was very quiet. Reid was still a sick man; the excitement of the night had brought a strong reaction, and his it iiuw. things on." Sylvia could sense that some- thing was happening of which she and licit I no knowledge. Kvery word ol' the sivmirij'Iy sim- ple conversal.on had a hidden "I like to go to the vil- lage. I want to buy a few small things. Js that Khe spoke to try to draw the detective, expecting a refusal. "I was about to suggest the I same thing-myself, and will come "You didn't arrest he. re-! with you if I may." narked in a puxy.led voice. "You need not be alnrmed- Sylvia bit her lip. This was fai loo subtle for her liking, but she did so. and it is '.he best look the children pslairs to get wounds ached "badly. He was; thing that emihl have happened.1'! their mackintoshes on. and for a angry with Selden for leaving! "JumosV" Sylvia cried. brief moment the two men were them practically prisoners in the! this is awful for him! Won't he library and exposed to some in- 'be brought up before, the magis- taugible danger. The thought that j t rates or the children were heing used as! "Not ln-mrc tomorrow, and to- eniMi maddening, and the children getting freiful. They want-Mi alone. 'Si-ldt-n, what the ilrvil uoo.s al Ibis lieid said crd.ssly. "It mrnn.s very likt-Iy life o death." Gulden's fare was vcr There was an undertone of cor- [grave. "1'lease follow my insirm KiriL.iift and a sort nf exhilaration I linns to Hit; Ictler. And tine tiling to go out into the grounds, and: "bout the detective's manner that more, Jack, I didn't want to fright- Sylvia bad to read Lo'them with a jcunyinrrc! that he knew that'en the children bloodhounds listless air. crisis was approaching, and Hint' When Ueid was not looking she continent us to "the result, cast a snd. questioning glance at "The seryants have all gone, and him. Her feelings were deeply I have locked up the key." He held it up. nay be loose tonight. Ifc go out on your life." "Why can't you stop with "That would ruin everything, but I shan't be far away." i The children came back, their that he loved her. and then had sarcastically. "You haven't white faces looking eliin in suddenly become cold, reserved. any chance locked up the mur- M-he large capes turner] up over and like a stranger, dhe tried toidcrur in the {their heads, think that the danger and the sit- "lint what are we to do imw hurt. He hnd told hor more plain- ly than in eloquent phraseology "Anything Reid nation they W.-M-O in. coupled wilh [Sylvia .iskfil, quite bewildered by his illneSin. accounted for this, hut-these revelations, in her heart she knew that there "You are at liberty In go out was some he for a walk if you fact, 1 would not tell her, that would advise it. I have told Hutchins on ways stand hetweon them. the phone that you have tinned He Imd come Into her life in this 1 Unit. Me is so busy with queer way, at a time when the in- {.fames, and taking down stale- tolerable existence at the Abbey j menls from Mrs. Thornton, that he had grown Impossible, and had [hardly appreciated what I said. I saved her from utter With n girl's curiosity she longed to know about him, who he was. mid how he had come at lluiUvcry moment to the Abbey. And then, just as tilings were becoming past hearing, a step was heard and Srldf-n culled out. Hen! unlocked the door: the detei live enti-iYMl with a smile on his facr. ami Sylvia hurried forward eag- erly. "What she asked wl great si-nsn of relief. filiUJe.utl lit rliHH despair, [told him 'Miss I-awrencc anil the children been found and that Is all right then'." em to care whether hci'ii I lOMj-.is." Marian I den at ottee Ihavi- to make rs for tin1 i go r.-.ir himed in. Hut S.'l- ne grave. "You'll shift wilh (hew prrsiMii only for nu manage that, Selden diit best to dispel the gloom that had settled on them all Hinting the ;u of James own way, nnd his n tanner Krid and Sylvia that he .T'ain thai Hiitchins had made a big blunder. "How could he possibly believe a vindictive, lying woman like that Mrs. Sylvia remarked with unusual passion. "He's had his eye on poor Selden chuckled, "and I'm not sure he doesn't inspect Reid as well, but he had no evidence." "They won't do any tiling to James, will the twins a.sked anxiously. "Nothing rtnit will hurt him. but the amusing thing Is that if he cioe.t happen to enme hetore ihe magistrates tomorrow Ihe chair- man will be f'nlo'nei (JrTi'lmiii." lie MCi.'iucd lo llml humor in [he Training Camps lilt Tin Axxwltltrtl I'rtMs Havana, Frankie Friscli ;md Cardinal officials awaited today the first test of the Red Bird pitching Dizzy two games with the New York Giants. Lon Wnrntkc will start today and Paul Eden sets the call Sunday. San Antonio, Browns appeared in good form today as they prepared for the training season opener against the Min- neapolis Millers, of the American Association, tomorrow. Carey, Clift and Davis were to report to- day. Avaloii, over signing his star outfielder, Frank Manager Grimm of the Cubs put squad through a snappy drill today to make up for a rain- storm that washed out yesterday's practice. The outfield remains the big problem, however. San Bernardino, sent the Pittsburgh Pirates train- ing field indoors for light exercises under electric lights. A second contingent of Buccaneers will ar- rive in camp Monday bringing the squad to its full force, except for holdout Paul Warier.- Havana, Tuba The New York Giants today begnn the task of tangling with one of their most BEEBE KEEPS UP FAST PACE IN CAGE MEET Jonesboro, Harrison And Little Rock Also In Semi-Finals Pine Bluff, March 13 playing their opponents in every quarter, Beebe's Flying Badgets paraded into the semi-finals of the state senior high school bas- ketball tournament today by drop- ping El Dorado's dark horse Union high quintet, 45-36. Paced by big Adams' 15-point goal tossing, Beebe led 11-6 at the quarter, 25-11 at the half and 32-19 at the third period. Jonesboro's Golden Hurricane smashed its way into the semi- finals with a convincing 50-33 rout of little Viola. Harrison's Goblins joined the Hurricane in the semi-finals with a 35-32 victory over Sulphur Rock. Jonesboro and Harrison will meet this afternoon for the right to en- ter tonight's finals. Little Rock's Tigers had little trouble in disposing of Casa, 40-26, in battle. The Beebe Badgers put on the wildest scoring spree of, the meet last.night to smash Tinsman, 70- 20- after walking off with a 55-39 dangerous national league rivals win ovcr in the first tins season-the St. Louis Cardu' round John nnls. Manager Bill Terry planned to throw Hal Schumacher, Cliff Mflton and Clyde Costleman against the gas house gang. St. Joe McCarthy named a trio of rookie hurlers to pitch for the Yankees in today's "grapefruit gtip" opener against the Boston Bees. Steve Sunrira will open the battle, with Kemp Wicker and Jim Tobin following up. Deese led.the attack to count-31 points, a scoring rec- ord for the tournament. Mulberry was declared ineligi- ble after winning from Harrison in the first round. The finals will be played to- night. Second round scores: Little Rock 38, Cross 2d? Casa 37, Hickory Ridge 23. Union 57, Greenbrier 32. Sulphur Rock 54, Centerville 16 Harrison 33, N. Little Rock 2G. Viola 42, Bay 34. Jonesboro 52, Bright Star 26. Beebe 70, Tinsman 20. order. Freddie Sington held the cleanup post, which Johnny Stone played last year. Clear water, Man- ush's clouting is giving Burleigh Grimes visions of a Brooklyn Dodger outfield with a lot of punch this season. The. big fly- chaser, making his debut in the national league, has been belting all brands of pitchipg in intra- squad exhibitions. Mexico regular out- field trio of the Philadelphia Ath- letics now is iniact. Wally Moses and Manager Mack reached n sal- ary agreement and Wally will join Bob Johnson and Lou Finney, his flychasing mates. Tuesday? Sarasotn, old Her- Detroit j bie Pennock, who has been in the Tiger rookie pitchers-wore up American League since 1912, will Tampa, Hollingsworth, the Cincinnati Reds' big No. 1 porlside hurler who closed last season with the expressed fear that his major league days were over, said today his pitching arm "never felt better." their first serious test today. Manager Mickey Coehrnm: culled on George Gill, Pat McLmiglilin, and George Coffman, recruits, and Vic Sorrell, veteran, in a scven- nning inlrii-squud game. Orlando, Washington Nationals divided into two teams today for "their first practice game the sehson. Some observers said the line-up take the Red Sox rookie pitchers out on the firing line today and give them lessons in throwing to first base. A trick few minor leaguers ever learn. Sarasotn Moun- tain Landis, high commissioner, of baseball, will be a spectator today when the Boston Bees launch their" exhibition baseball series against the world champion New York of'Shanty Hogan's team was a j Yankees. A crowd of is cx- tip-6ff "on a change in the batting ipected. DAILY CROSS WORD PUZZLE 19 24- IS 36 [4 34- IS 32. 13 ACROSS 1--A letter of ems the English alphabet slyly 4--A of southern the Old conatella- Testament tton bleat feminine grain -vat pronoun that Failure inland whom sc- lakes crets are 34--The unlver- entrunted sity at New dreas the Haven, cavity of a Conn, tooth A mottled streak in poetic mahogany of up -ob before-c Bulgarian river coin on which iron- headed ance 25- -Unintelli- gent. of aatisfac- small tion duty 13- At liberty on gazelle, of bottle A donkey 30 A pen for swine A game cards Tibet small trumpet of Spanish- America Answer to previous puzzle river in Petrograd government 3G--Symbol tat aluminum prefix 24 Paris lies prefix -A whl'.e linen vest- ment DOWN suffix 'LieU 6- to form noun-plu- 2-So golf club for Samarium A silk sash worn by women 6 -A butt   

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