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Blytheville Courier News: Saturday, July 14, 1962 - Page 1

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   Blytheville Courier News (Newspaper) - July 14, 1962, Blytheville, Arkansas                                VOL. 67 BLYTHEVILLE, ABKANSAft, _ 8 PAGES I CENTS Kennedy's Business Sense Is Questioned By Chamber Leader WASHINGTON (API A top spokesman for the if 'he munity says he wonders if the Kennedy administration really understands what makes Ameri- can business tick. But the spokesman, President H. Ladd Plumley of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, told newsmen that President Kennedy appears to he trying to. improve relations between the White House and the businessman. Plumley conferred with the President Friday then had lunch- eon with newsmen.'He told than: "I am not sure-that the ad- ministration fully recognizes that this free enterprise system oper- ates...on the decisions which are 16 Candidates AcceptJaycee Bid To Speak Lie Down! You Are Depressed By WALTER R. MEARS WASHINGTON peo- ple of Trinity County, Calif., didn't know (hey were economical- y depressed until the government toM them. And they don't like it, The issue boiled up Friday when Engle, a California Demo- crat, complained to Secretary of Commerce Luther H. Hodges about the government-proclaimed says Sen. Clair Engle. But that's the way it has to be, Ple- at least for the time being, says the agency that runs a program plight of Trinity, a northern Cali- fornia county of some peo- Sixteen candidates and 730 pounds of catfish will be fried at the Jaycee fish fry and political rally Thursday night. Ray Gill, chairman, said he has received a definite "yes" from the 16 candidates and more are ex- pected to be here. The fish fry will be held at the Jaycee hut, and Safeway parking lot will be used for the speaking County candidates will be given 10 minutes each to speak. Candi- dates for governor will get about SO minutes. Gill said he received answers from the following candidates: Kenneth Coffelt, Gov. Orval Faubus, Sid McMath and Bubbs Rickets candidates for governor. Mrs. Crip Hall and Kelly Bry- ant, candidates for state treas- urer. Frank Holt, candidate for the Supreme Court, and Jimmy Jones, candidate for state auditor. Bob Holthouse, sheriff candi- date; O. D. Brewer, candidate for representative; Frank Whit- worth, candidate for county treas- urer, are to speak. County Judge (Shug) Banks and L. H. Aulry, state representative, said they would be on hand. Sen. J. W. Fulbright and his opponent; Winston C. Chandler, told Gill they will be here or send a representative. Speaking Of Economy: Algeria Isn't Healthv Child ALGIERS (AP) Moslem and I made people .lose heart. Many French officials and businessmen who left temporarily have de- .say the economy of the I0-day-old Algerian nation is nearly on the rocks and no one has any con- crete plan for keeping it afloat. "Confidence is said one European banker. "Business ac- tivity is down to about one third of what it was six months ago, and it is still declining." He added: "The events of the past few days, the disputes between the leaders, the lawlessness and the administrative this .has ieing made daily by thousands o rather than by gov- ernment steering. What bothers businessmen Plumley said, a uncertainty They want conditions "predictable and ptottable so that they car. plan their own He said businessmen are ask ing: If the economy is being j steered by the government today, in what direction will it be.guided tomorrow? As an example, he cited Ken- nedy's commencement address at Yale University month in which the President appeared to be seeking a truce with the busi- ness community after the uproar that followed his jtrocg opposition to a steel price increase. Plumley said the President re- marked that deficit financing by the government could not be olerated indefinitely, but also said that defic isolcseueasrv dl aa economic stimulant. "It was left to the reader to decde what the position ot the President was under, circum- stances of the Plumley commented. However, Plumley also said that Kennedy "seems to be taking repeated steps to encourage a dialogue and understanding be- tween business and the Presi dent." He said relations are improving after reaching "a pretty low ebb' during the steel price increase crisis of last April. He cited as an example the new depreciation guidelines' announce! by the Treasury this weefc.a iriovi expected to save business and in dustry billion in taxes next year. Plumley said at the luncheon that he feels part of the mis understanding between Kenned, and business stemmed from a mutual breakdown in comrhun: cations between them. The Chamber president said th purpose of his meeting was make a progress report on th Chamber's study of ways to the U.S. deficit in internationa payments. He wouldn't disclose of special federal aid foot de- pressed areas. Under the rules, a spokesman said, 'a county can get off the de- pressed list only when employ- ment statistics show an economic upturn. He added no county of- ficial has asked that Trinity be taken off the roster: of the Area Redevelopment Administration. Engle said Congress did not create the ARA "to force rede- velopment medicine down the throats of areas that don't know they are depressed, that haven't applied for this federal assistance and don't want it." The program should be volun- tary; Engle said. "I supported the Area Rede- velopment he said in a let- :er to Hodges. "It has been Beneficial in alleviating economic depression in many areas. I hope overzealous bureaucracy will no- spoil H." Engle noted that the Trinity County Journal erf Weaverville Calif., had published an editoria headed: "Lie down and be de- pressed, damn you." In his letter to Hodges, whose department has charge of the ARA. Engle said: "I believe when an economic survey of employ- ment data warrants, that a county can be advised of the possible benefits of the ARA and that the next move should be up to the county." what he reported. DAILY RECORD Traffic Accidents Cars driven by Jerry Martin, 1603 W. Walnut, and ludy Autry, 910 W. Ash, collided at. an alley and N. Second Street. Martin was charged with failure to yield right-of-way. Minor fender bending --eported. Cars drven by Denny Wlson, 300 Ruildle Road and Calvin Ralph, Chicago, collided at W Ash and S. Third Streets. A parked car owned by Walter Lassiter, Memphis, was slightly damaged when pushed into a tele- phone pole at i be Sands Motel. Minor damages were reported in a two-car collision a'. S. Second and W. Streets yesterday. City police said cars driven by R. H. Godsey, 919 N Sixth; and Leslie Robert Fey, BlylheviUe'Air Force Base, were involved. Building Permits E. M. Finley, 2300 Peabody, bar- becue pit. Cancer Workers Ask For Sheets Cancer, Inc., needs worn shee to use in making bandages, Mrs. W. E. MacDill, chairman, an- nounced today. The group is meeting heavy re- quirements for patients in Bly- theville. Anyone with any sheets which could be used is asked to call Mrs. cided not to come back and others who were determined to stay are now packing their bags." All along the fashionable Rue Michelet and other streets of Al- giers' European Quarter, three out of every four stores are closed. Faded notices on the iron shutters of most say "closed for paid vacation." The owners, all Europeans, agreed among themselves to close down during the independ- ence celebrations and take a va cation in France. Many of them expected the eel- MacDUl at LeHigh 2-52T? ebrations to turn into large-scale race, riots and looting rampages. j These did not for a street battle costing 104 lives in Oran on July 5. Yet the European's are leaving the country in a steady stream despite desperate Moslem appeals to stay and help build the new na- ion. The Moslem leaders know they cannot- run the nation at present without the Europeans, who have a near-monopoly of technical skills and economic power. Some of the Europeans are moving away in a spirit of re- sentment, as if they really wanted to sabotage a state which they fought to the last. JFK Names Celebrezze To Cabinet HYANN1S PORT. Mass. President Kennedy today named Anthony J. Celebrezze, mayor of Cleveland, Ohio, as the new sec- retary of health, education and welfare. Kennedy's surprise announce- ment was read lo newsmen by as- sistant White House press Secre- tary Andrew J. Hatcher. Hatcher said Celebrezze is expected to as- sume the post as soon as he is confirmed by the Senate. Celebrezze will. succeed Abra- ham A. Ribicoff, who resigned Thursday when he formally an- nounced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for the Senate from Connecticut. PLAN St. IOUIS TRIP Courier News Cir- culation Manager Ted Brown and Bob Sullivan (resr) of Bob Sullivan Chevrolet this week com; pleted plans for motoring approximately two dozen Courier News carriers; who have won ex- pense-paid trips, to St. Louis. Group will spend July 24 and 25 in city, visiling zoo ami other sights and seeing Cardinals play ball. (Courier News Photo) The identity of Ribicoff's suc- cessor was one of the best kept secrets of the Kennedy adminis- tration. Celebrezze's name bad not fig- ured in the speculation for the post. Many others had been men- tioned, but informed sources, with- out giving any hint as to whom il would be, insisted (he appointment would come as a surprise. In Cleveland, Celebrezze said in a statement: t "I am grateful for the conli dence that Presdent Kennedy has expressed in me. 1 shall; do my best to merit this confidence.' Thi: new assignment "presents a grea challenge and a great opportunit) to be of servce to people. I shal always be grateful to the people of Cleveland for granting me the privilege of serving them as their mayor." B.H. Lincoln, Former Local Teacher, Dies Benjamin H. Lincoln, 68, er Blytheville teacher, died Thurs- iv at a Memphis hospital. Mr. Lincoln, a native of Raven- en Springs, taught here several ago. He lived in Pocahoatai or Hie past 22 years. He received his bachelor's de- gree frbm-TOuachita Baptist Col- ege and his master's degree from he University of.Arkansas. Mr. Lincoln was dean of South- ern Baptist College in Walnut. Ridge before entering the insur- ance business in Pocahontas; He was a veteran of World War. I and a Baptist. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Eunice Taylor Lincoln, Pocahon- tas: One son, Benjamin Livingston Lincoln, Shreveporl, La.; A sister, Mrs. Emma Blanks, Gowen, Okla., and one grandchild. Services will be held at '.his afternoon at First Baptist Church in Pocahontas. Burial will be in Masonic Ceme- tery by McNabb Funeral Horned American Dies In Action By MALCOLM BROWNE SAIGON, South Viet Nam (AP) U.S. Army captain and at least 23 Vietnamese soldiers were killed today when a government convoy was ambushed by Commu- nist Viet Cong forces 40 miles north of Saigon. The Red guerrillas fled after the attack carried out in battalion strength. Government paratroopers were dropped at the site an hour after (he ambush to aid a relief battal- ion that arrived by road. Besides (he dead. 20 Vietnamese troops were wounded and four asted only a few minutes before i government soldiers were over whelmed. The name ot the dead American was withheld pending notification of his family. His death brought to seven the number of American servicemen killed in combat with the Viet Cong since (he buildup of U.S forces began here last December. Sixteen others have died n acci- dents. U.S. authorities reported (hat the Viet Cong ambush force was under air observation and was be- ai ucrugn A-.MH, were missing, jne iigm pursued by ligmer planes, U.5. Reds Prove They Can Out-Goof The By FRED S. hints of conditions WASHINGTON Top Soviet cylinder, weighing many officials are chortling over a report was u-cis sent to (he Novosibirsk sized Soviet goof which saw high-level U.S. plant in Siberia sian workers spend a year part of a collection of such precision work that took al- takingly making an a year. machine which other one source put it, the next step was lo ship the ers then cut into published in part back to a heavy press The blunder, by the shows "they also presumably for assembly own admission, wasted although the what was believed (o be a of usually try to tell" the forging press. The report, which slipped things are going just occurred the blunder. the carefully controlled of shipping the huge press, first went unnoticed in Russian publication told to the fabricating plant West. But then it was spotted building of a large goofed and sent it to a American experts who sift all for one of the most powerful where it was cut u[ available material for between- [draulic presses in the scrap. imy helicopters loaded with Vietnamese troops and ransport planes carrying para- roops. There was no indication whether iie Communists suffered any cas- Celebrezze, SI, has been mayor of Cleveland since 1953. Kennedy, in announcing the ap- pointment, said Celebrezze "brings to my Cabinet a wealth of experi- ence gained from having worked through the years with the prob- lems of people, particularly in the areas of health, education and wel- fare." "He great A South Vietnamese jeep was lestroyed and two trucks were leavily damaged in the ambush n a heavily forested area of Na- ional Route 14, the same road on vhich two U.S. officers were cilled in another Red ambush June 16. About 280 government wo companies from the airborne brigade and a command group- were in the convoy as it headed north on an escort mission. The convoy was to have picked up employes of an engineering firm working at an outpost. The company and nature of its work were not disclosed, but several civilian contractors are working on radio and radar nets along the Vietnamese frontier with Laos Cambodia. Route 13 leads to the Cambodian frontier. therefore brings to this department an intimate Bank Burglary LESLIE, Ark. Leslie Slate Bank was burglarized Fri- day night of an undelermjned amount of of it be- lieved '.o have been coins. Knowledge which will prove inval- uable in making the department an effective instrument for the general Kennedy's state- ment said. Celebrezze was born Sept. 4 1910 at Nazi, Italy. .Hatcher ex- plained however, '.hat his parents who were natives of Italy, were naturalized U.S. citizens who were visiting their homeland at the ime. This made him an American citizen automatically, Hatcher said. Celebrezze, one of thirteen chil- dren, attended Cleveland public schools and John Carroll Universi- ty. He then went to Ohio Northern University, Ada, Ohio, where he received his law degree in 1936. He was admitted to the bar in Ohio the same year. In Washington. Sen. Stephen M. Young, D-Ohio, lauded Kennedy's choice of Celebrezze (on the Cabi- net post. "He is an ideal Young said. Sen. Frank J. Lausche, D-Ohio, said in a statement he was "high- y pleased" by Celebrezze's selec- ion for the Cabinet post. Tours County Towns Wallace Hurley, Camden, through Blylheville yesterday on handshaking campaign for tost of lieutenant governor. He visited most of the town in Mississippi County during his ona day tour. Hurley is opposing the present incumbent, Nathan Gordon, Mor- rillon, who has held the post fora 18 years. The candidate is head of Hurley Priniing Company in Camden. It specializes in school yearbooks. Wreck Kills N.L.R. Youth NORTH LITTLE ROCK (AP) One North Little Rock boy was killed and two were injured when the car in which they were riding (ruck a bridge railing on Re- mount Road about miles north f North Little Rock early today. State Police said Herman Floyd Wck, 18, was dead on arrival at Little Rock hospital. Officials at the hospital said Larry DuBose, 17, was in poor ondition, and Ronnie Heslep, 17, 'as in fair condition. High Cost of Hollywood Romance HOLLYWOOD, Calif. (AP> [Reginald A Wike was excited as MacDaniel Brothers Construe-1 he entered the Hollywood bowling tion Company, post office at Broadway and Kentucky. Blytheville DeLinting Corpora- tion, S. Highway 61 permit to build new delinking plant. Fred Boren, 2225 Carolyn, per- mit to build 4-room nouse. Albert Luster, permit to move house from LaCfede Street to 819 'Keith Street. George Slaughter; 6-roorn house at corner of Belmoor Lane and MontecUlr Streets. alley and looked about for his blind dale. He wore a grey suit, as he'd promised. She to have on a yellow shortie coat. "What if' there are two girls with yellow shortie asked anxiously when she tele- phoned him. It was good he'd thought o( (or there were, indeed two girls with yellow shortie coats. He was glad he'd suggested she carry a red KM tw ittrcaed 'or the girl who'd inserted this ad I parity in their ages was a trifle in the personal column of a met-! in 53 and she 39. ropolilan newspaper: "Attractive brunette, 5 ft. 6V4 in., i33 Ibs, affectionate, would like to meet nice man with prop- erty." Reginald, a well-to-do landscape contractor, had liked that. He'd written to the box number, she'd celled bint up, and new- He spotted her. She was wear- ing the coat. She the rose. And he found her very indeed. hit it oil at The dis- Her name was Lu- cille Hackenbcrger. They took in a movie. She told him he was so distinguished look- ing she thought he was doctor. "I felt so flattered and bashful I just Reginald told a friend. She proved to be affectionate, too. She kissed him that night- something of a surprise, "1 ordinarily don't kiss a per- son on the first explained Reginald. That memorable blind date was' on Dec. H. I9.i3. They saw a lot of each other from then on. On New Year's Day, he proposed. She accepted. They were two of the happiest lovers in the world. But something always kept in- terfering with their wedding. She kept having to put it off. Mean- while, he was glad to be able to heip his fiancee with her finances. Seven long years elapsed. He felt this was too long an engage- ment. He became impatient. Finally, he convinced himself she didn't love him at all-didn't even intend marrying him. H was late 1960. He talked to a lawyer. Superior Judge Eugene P. Fay ruled Friday that Reginald, now 62, had il doped correctly, that she was after his properly. The judge ordered Miss Hacken bergcr, now to give back 000 worth of real estate he'd deeded to her. But the judge said there was nothing he could do about casl gifts the disappointed swain Mi he'd made over the years enough evidence, the judge held Reginald uid they came to abou W.OOO, Woman Gets State Office CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) Gov. Grant Sawyer has made the first appointment of a woman l< s major slate office. She is Maude Frazicr of Las Vegas, a state legislator, who was named Friday as lieutenant governor. Miss Frazicr will serve out llv unespircd term of the late Lt Gov. Rex Bell, who died las week. Her successor will tak office next January. J Thant In Dublin DUBLIN. Ireland (AP) U.N. Acting Secretary-General U Thant arrived from Geneva Friday night 'or a 3-day visit. Weather Storms Hit Japan TOKYO IAP) A severe thun- derstorm hit various parts of Japan Friday, causing landslides and floods. Four persons were reported killed In southwestern Japan by and lightning. ARKANSAS Clear to parti; cloudy and hot with widely scat- tered afternoon and evening thun- dershowers mostly north through Sunday: high today 95-103; low to- night 70s. Increasing cloudi- ness this morning with thunder- storms (his afternoon and tonight; locally heavy rain; chance of strong, gusty surface winds and hail in the more severe thunder- storms; high today 90-96; low to- night in the 70s; partly cloudy and continued warn Sunday with thunderstorms. High 96 Overnight 78 Mean PTKIplUtion out M boult (7 im. o r 1 to Slmwt SunrlM This High ft7 OvtrnlsM W FnclptUtloa Ju. 1 to tin   

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