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Yuma Weekly Sun Newspaper Archive: April 27, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Weekly Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Weekly Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 27, 1945, Yuma, Arizona                             EVERYTHING IN rUMA REVOLVES AROUND THE SUM The Yum a Weekly Sun AND 1HL Yl'MA EXAMINER THE NEWSPAPER THAT GOES HOME VOLUME -li YUMA. ARIZONA FRIDAY, APRIL NUMBER 17 BATTLE RAGES IN THE HEART OF BERLIN BREMEN IS CAPTURED BY BRITISH SECOND ARMY THIRD ARMY CLOSING IN ON PASSAU Americans Near Closer to Fort In Bavaria li.V Unit I'll Prtws War Correspimdr.nl PARIS. April 26 (U.R) The British Second army cleared vir- tually all of the wrecked North Sea port of Bremen today and in, the south American Third army troops closed swiftly on the Ba- varian fortress of Passau, G7 miles from Berchtcsgadch. German resistance in Bremen collapsed suddenly this afternoon after more than a week of savage, close-in lighting and three days of concentrated aerial bombardment that reduced the Reich's second port to rubble. Front dispatches said 'a few die- hard NuzLv, including the Bremen commander. Gen. Becker, still were holding out in the ruined port area along the Wcser river late today. Scots Knee In Hut tough Scottish riflemen nnd armored troop' carriers were rac- ing through the streets to finish them off and complete the'.capturc of Ihc oily seemed imminent. IA'BBC broadcast recorded by FCC monitors in New York said Bremen had been Delayed front dispatches, lag- ging 12 hours ami-more behind Pillion's racing tanks, said the Americans .were only JI miles from Passim lost night niiii roll- Ing unchecked through disorgan- ized German opposition. Bxpi'cl oi'irasiiiff Sunn There was every possibility that the Third army' would cross the Danube into Austrian soil near Passim within a. matter of hours, if it had not already done so, to- close the northern arm of the So- viet-American pincers on the in- ner defenses of Nazidom's arian redoubt. Bav- Two Third Army infantry divi- sions forced the ill three points Danube barrier an IS-mile front east find .west of Kcgens- burg, 50-odd miles northwest of rnssn.ii, early today. They broke into Kcg'cnsburg a n d stabbed ahead within about 50 miles of Munich. Other Third Anhy troops drove lip to Ihe -Danube farther west in the Ingolstndt area, only 42 miles north-northwest of Munich, and a third column WHS ncaring the river in Ihc Straubing area, almost midway between Rcgens- burg and Pa-ssau. Munich MiMiaccil Munich, the capital of Bavaria iind cradle, of Nazism, also was menaced by American Seventh Army troops farther west. Un- confirmed reports said the Yanks there were only 30 miles north- west of the city. The Danube crossing sluiltcrcd the last natural defense line be- fore the Nazi Bavarian redoubt itself and spilled a torrent of American troops, tanks and guns into the streets of Rcgcnsburg main outer fortresses covering Munich and the roads lo Bcrcli- tcsgaden. Field -dispatches said Gon. George S. ration's Third Army veterans were battling into Rc- gcnHburg on Hie south bank of the Danube from the east and west against half-hearted enemy Continued on Pwe 41 K. C. to Hold Smoker Friday For Returnees Klglil members of Co. L, ISSth Infiintry. who recently returned l.o Ynmn from long service over- seas, will be honored at a Knights of Columbus smoker lo be held nl Ihc 1C. of C. hull Friday nt p. m., it announced. The eight listed as fol- lows: Staff Scrgcnnt.1 Albert C. Aynla and Tony 'Abrll; Technical Sergeants Alfred Bcdoya and C a rl o s Cnmpuznno, and Ser- geants Albert Aviln, Ramon Mar- tinez, Albert Bustamente and George Gonzales. Firemen's Pension Funds to Share April 2K (U.R) --Firemen's pension funds in Ari- zona communities will share collected by the state cor- poration commission in the form of a 2 per cent premium tax from fire -insurance companies. The commission instructed the stale auditor to draw warrants, in accordance with the law im- posing the tax, in favor of muni- cipalities including the following: Phoenix, Tucson, 274.11; vuina. Clifton 52S5.03; Saftord, Thatcher, Solo- monsville, Globe, Bisbee, Douglas, 4.00J5; Nogulcs U.S. TROOPS PUSH CLOSE TO DAVAO Northwestern Luzon Is Cleared By Guerrillas By lilCIIARll O: IIAKRIS United Press Correspondent MANILA, April 20; of the 24th; division pushed into the hills of central MindanaoJLo- day. in a lightly opposed drive that; carried less than from Davao. Disorganized Japanese forces put up only scatlcred rcsislahcc as Ihe Amnricans thrust to the village of Manaboan. midway bc- Iwcen -Davno iind the invasion beaches on Ihc east coast of Moro gulf. Since Ihe landing the 24th di- vision has moved rapidly over the comparatively Hat coastal ter- rain but was now enlcring 'the central hill country most of which still is unexplored. First Photo: Russians in Berlin! I NBA Rudio-Telciihoto) A Russian tank carrying infantrymen is shown surging suburban streets of Berlin in this first picture of the invasion of :'lhe YANKS CRASH JAP LINE ON OKINAWA Japs Killed; Total ALL MEAT EXW MUTTON TO BE UNDER RATIONING STARTING SUNDAY Gen. 'royince Is Cleared Douglas MacArliiur nounccd lhal Filipino guerrillas had cleared the province of :Ilocos Sur in northwestern .Luzon of or- ganized enemy forces and now .'ere mopping up scattered Jap- anese remnants. The province is jusl south. of llocos Nortc, w'hich previously had been cleared by tjie Filipinos, and it gave MacArthur's' ffirccs complcle control of the north- wcslcrn corner of American Iroops, ran into strong opposilion as Uicy drove within a little more than a mile northwest .of Bagnio, former Philippines summer capital south- casl of llocos Sur province. Temporarily Halted Front rcporLs disclosed that. Uements of the 3'Jrd division were lemporarily hailed five miles sl of Biiguio by Japanese troops holding out in a 000-foot tiuincl on Uic Asin-Baguio road. Philippines-based raided Formosa's li.V Kit AN K VI United Press! War Cnrrospondc.nl GUAM, April 26 re- ports said today that U. S. Army troops had-smashed the first maj- or Japanese defense line on south- ern Okinawa.. AH key terrain on which the line w-as anchored was captured by Ihe Americans as Ihcy pushed more 'than half a mile through the strong Japanese defenses lo less lhan .three nml a half miles from Nitiiii, capital of the ishuid. Japs Killed .While the Japanese staggered under the weight of the American land, naval and' aerial blows. Ad- miral Chcsler W. Nimitz an- nounced lhal troops were killed on Okinawa and the surrounding islands up to yester- day. Most of Ihc Japanese were kill- ed on Okinawa and it was esti- mated enemy had lost une- third of its- original garrison in the1 bloody fighting on the island, S2S miles from Japan. Only iiOO Japanese'were taken prisoner. .American casualties in the cam- paign ;us of April 22, were: Army: SSO dead; wounded and missing: marines: dead. wounded iind seven missing. NimiU also ui.fdoscd lhat the town of Kiikuzu. in the'center of bucn rclakcn by WASHINGTON, April 26 Price Ciiief Chesler Bowlcjs- per cent of :ail.'iijeat under rationing in order lo spijea.d more evenly civilian supplicFi! ex- pected lo drop anolhcr. siK'milli pounds in May. Beginning -Sunday .nnu uonlinur iiis the'.' I'th'c 'jTekt ration period June .2, .ail -.meats cxccpl mutlon will'-refjuir.c -red. points, including cull and utilily grades of veal'and lamb and. ali gradra of less popular' cuts...of vciil and lamb., such as brna.st-s. shanks, iiccks and flank.s. Other changes in the meat mill fat rationing prbgraiii :for-. May will. be 'increases of. '.one .to bvo. points per pound, for most cuts, of lamb-and veal and one point for most, beef decreases of one to two. on beef judge Removes Tempe from Of Gretna Greens roasts-and other cuts of. creases, of four poinU for mar- garine; and two points- for grade oiic cheeec. -.Itntter Unchanged Butler and hamburger.' remain unchanged at 24. and 6 points per pound. :So. Uo ration values of. i'hortcning, -and salad .-oils. expanded program for May piits-.meat rationing back where it was :a year ago before most meals, were made point free. Since Page 4.) -IVv UNITED PRESS ,.-A 'Ssviss Telegraph-Agency dis- patch by 'the.. -FCC said !lpday thai according to reports from reliable .sources Bcnito Mus- PHOENIX, Ariz., April 20 (U.R) L -Aroused by 'the larger number yjotg. ;rallanza on the of child marriages; many ending shore of Lake Maggiore. slini w'as capured by Italian pa- west bombers again lllc LsliuKl' anl] the army Lroop sank cighl more cargo ships in Ihc China Sea blockade. The biggcsl shipping bag was ;il Hainan island where ii 4.000- ton frcightcr-lriinsporl, three small freighters nml Ii! barges wnre sunk -'.nil a t.OOO-Um frcight- er-trahsporl probably sunk while Lrying lo slip out of Yulin hiir- bor. British Capture Toungoo, Burma CALCUTTA, April 2G (U.PJ--Hrl- tish and Indian troops of the 14th nrmy have captured Toungoo. Burma's 10th largest city, 140 miles norlh of Rangoon, a com- munique announced today. Caplurc of the city which hail a peacetime population of followed a IGIl-milc advance .south from Meihtila in 21 days during which more than Jiipimciie were killed. After occupying the city, Ihc Lroops seized a group of .'unround- ing airfields and continued the drive south. v Other 14th Army troops cast of Meiktila were reporled encounter- ing opposition along the Japanese route of withdrawal into the Shim States! ps in Ihe renewed drive through the Japanese de- fense bell stretclie'd across Okin- awa above Na.ha. United Press Correspondent (Continued >m Page Soldier, Sailor Fight Oyer Girl, Run Over By Car WILLIAMS FIELD. Ariz., Apr. 20 A soldier and sailor, con- fined to hospital beds here today, liavc plenty of time today to pon- der the question "Was riln1- worth The .sailor, .lack G. Gillcy. 2.'i. slalioncd at Ihn Litclificld Naval Fiicility, siiffurcn 'two compound leg fractures, and the soldier, Flight Officer Clarence A. Lunn, 20, Williams Field, sustained chest injuries when struck by n" auto- mobile while fighting over ii girl. The young woman, whose charms nearly proved fatal. CH- rapod with minor bruises. A 11 thrco were on Iho ground nn Ihe highway in front of The Palms, a bar between Mtsa and Tempo, when a oar driven by Leon Hunt, (7f> Alnmcda Tucson, struck them. Hunt wns not held. Following emergency treat- ment at a Phoenix hospital, 'the servicemen were removed to the Williams Field station hospital. in annulments, Superior Judge Harold R. Schovillc has removed Tcmpc from trie list of Arizona's, Gretna Greens. Walter S. Wilson. clerk of the Mnricopa superior court, acting on Judge's Scovillc's orders, has revolted the appointment of Mrs. Bertha McCaw, xvifc of Tempo Justice of' Pence Paul V. Mc.Caw, as a deputy clerk authorized to issue marriage licenses. The McCaws were operating. :a 24-hour service in the issuance of licenses and Ihc performance of weddings, a practice said to be common throughoul Ihe state. Scovillc acted after receiving reports by probation officers Ihal Mrs. McCiuv Monday issued licen- ses to a 14-year-old girl and a 16- year-old boy mill a 15-year-old prl ami a. 17-ypnr-old boy. The McCaws declared thai par- ents liad granted permission for the marriages and had sworn the girls .were over 16 and Ihc boys over 18. Scovillc has asked tlio county attorney to consider undertaking prosecution of persons issuing or aiding and abetting in the issu- ance of marriage licenses to chil- dren. Wilson has sent Idlers to nil deputies authorized lo issue licen- ses in Maricopa counly dirccling lhat applicants of questionable age be required to show draft cards or birth cerllfiea'tcfl. GLENN TAYLOR TO ARRIVE HOME ON NAVY LEAVE SOON Sciinum First Class Glenn Vny- lor has rcliirned to the- United States after service In the .Smith Pacific and will be home in n few days, according lo word re- ceived loday ay his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl of B avc- mifl and Fourth street. Mussolini was d c.s c r i b c d as reaching Pallanza after flight from Milan, where an Italian pa- trlo't uprising was said unofficial- ly to have, liberated Ihe cily. The dispatch, without confirma- ion in any other .source, reporling lhal Mussolini hail .been caplured followed by a few" hours anolhcr Swiss agency report thai Musso- lini had fled in disguise from Mi- lan lo the border town of Como. Bulletins! LONDON. A r i I 20 (U.R) Marshal Stalin announced to- niglit thai. iJm R-ed nrmy Iind captured Brno, capital of Alor- nria.' UNITED PRESS The British radio said late to- day Uiatk Rome reported the Allies landing at Itapallo la Hie. Gulf of (ienon. LONDON, Apr. M Khai Stalin announced fmiiglif Unit, the Kcii army had raptiir- eil Stetlinl Germany's greatest naltir. port an c Ii   (''roiifli Army (mops. KOJIIC. April can troops raptured Verona to- day, jin Italian patriot uprising was reported unofficially to iuivr. liberated Milan, Gcjma and Turin, and all signs indicated .Gorman reslHlnncu i n North .Uuly was collunslng. MILAN AND GENOA ARE LIBERATED German Resistance In North Italy Collapses By IfKKBERT KING United Press War Correspondent ROME.f.April general uprising of Italian patriots was reported unofficially today to have broken the German grip on north Italy and liberated Milan, Gphon, Turin, Verona and scores of other towns. Allied military authorilics, whose armies 'were sweeping deep into northern Italy on the heels of routed German forces, wilh- held immediate confirmation of rqports from the norlh of the re- bellion against the Nazis and Fa- cists. But accounts of the uprisings were supported by every evidence that the .patroits had. seized and were operating the radios in Mi- lan and Genoa. Supplementary reports circulated freely In" the Swiss border-areas.' Swiss Reports Swiss 'advices quoted an Italian press dispatch a s hinting thai Benlto Mussolini ..was, frying -to make a.deal with the patriot's..In an effort save his lite. He-was reported to have.been set Up as a Nazi figurehead'-in: .'-North' Italy after he "rescued" by the Germans when his Facist regime cracked up. 'IThis the dispatch was quoted, "Mussolini sent a man bearing a flag of truce to head of the Milan Socialist :party and offered lo permit partisans to take over power on' condition that the Germans and new Fas- cisls be allowed to.leave without (Continued oil 41 Leave For Induction Station, Phoenix The following inductees left Lo- cal-Board No. 1 ..Wednesday for the induction .station in Phoenix. Af- ter laking Ihcir oath, they will be assigned to various branches of Ihc service and on lo camp. Raymond Hill Houghton David George Loll Raymond Howard McKenney Robert E. Lee liearn Edward C. Lugo Ignacio Cruz Rocha William Raymond Guarc Oswaldo Gradillas Alfred Morris Higuera Gcnaro Hernandez Henry. Clarence Lcverton Arnaldo Gradiilas Guy Edward Gillam Russell W. Phillips Fernando Martinez Adislado Ruiz Sanchez Andrew Torres Homy Vcrnon Halhcock Pedro P. Orijalvn, Gregorio Burgoz Henry Benlon Rinker Lawrence Edward .Hunter Rcfugion Nunez Henry David Figucroa John Siqueiros, Jr. Luis Gonzaga Calderon Clyde Marshall Thompson Transfers In: Jose Parades Sanitate, El Centro, Calif. Jeff Harmon, El C'eulro. Calif. R. Martinez, Tulare, Calif. Loui-s V. Gonzulp.s. Jr.. An- geles. Calif. Mike M. Jr., 101 Centro, Vincenle Y. Torres, El Ccnlro, Calif Mid Vcrnon Rober-son, El Centro "Talif. Ted Douglas Dnnicl, Phoenix, Ariz. Our registrants from Parker: Marry Amador Harry Welsh, Jr. Daniel M. Holmes WcndcH Willis Goodman The following registrants liave 'ailed to report for induction, if my one knows Ihc whereabouts of the following registrants, kindly conlnct Ihe local board: Loiiln J. Velarde Gonzales Julian Navarro Lopez Thomas Goze Pimentel Yuman Lays Wire In 3 Countries in One Afternoon With the OOlh Infantry Division on the Western Front Just a few days ago in Ihe brief space of one afternoon, a four-man wire crew of the OOlh Artillery division laid wire in three different coun- Ides. Stringing the yilal communica- tion lines 'between Ihc 90lh Divi- sion Arlillery and advance ele- ments of DOth Infantry Corporal Calvin Marlin of Lamar. Cold., and his three Corp. Marvin Endersbe of Fonda; la; Pfc. L. D. Johnson of Minol. No. Dak., and Pfc. Oda Holt of Yuma. Ariz., crossed .the frontiers, of Luxembourg, Belgium arid Ger- many. SHOWDOWN LOOMS ON POLEMATTER Molotov Slated To Speak This Afternoon SAN FRANCISCO April M is schedule for the United Nations confer- a. m meets in executive M3.si.ion p. pleii session ot tin, conference to hear report" of (he steering tonunu tee. p. in After receiving the report of tlie steering committee the plen ary session will hear .addresses by Chinese 1 oreign Minister T V. Soong, Russian Foreign Commissar V.-..M; Molotov, and British Foreign SccroJary An- thony Eden. By LYLK'O.WILSON United ress Staff Corrcsponileul SAN FRANCISCO; April 20 I .growing, tension .gripped delegates to Ihe .United Nations conference today 'as. the Big Three powers moved toward- a show- down, on' the explosive Polish qunslipn. Hotel lobbies buzzed willi spec- ulation that Soviet Foreign. Com- missar V. M. Molotov, chief Rus- sian delegate here, may have re- ceived new instructions from Pre- mier JoscC Stalin on the Polish issue and thai he ready to with Secretary Ed- ward R. Stcliinius, Jr., and Bril- ish Foreign Secretary Anlhony Eden. IVtololov to Speak Mololov was scheduled to ad- dress a. plenary session of the conference around 4 p. m., PWT. The delegates awaited his speech eagerly for some hint on the Kremlin's latest word on Poland and perhaps on Russia's demand for three votes in the assembly of the proposed world organization to be set up here. But guesses were thai Molotov probably would avoid any discussion of (Continued on Pase 4) Toosfmasters Urge Cooperation In Clothing Drive Speakers at Toastmastem rlnV urged cooperation in 'the current clothing drive Hi the Monday nighl meeting and the program later was broadcast lo the gen- eral public over ratlin station KYUM. Ralph Brandt and Wayne Miles were the speakers assigned by President Sam Flake for the pur- pose of putting new life into the drive which is said lo be lagging somewhat in the city. Mr. Brandt urged that everyone throw off the "mamma" spirit and look to their clothpK closets for old cUithing that is badly needed in .suffering Europe. Mr. Miles called attention to the fact that with a qiiotn of pounds for Yiiinu county, only pounds had been collected to date. He slrcssed that people should take Ihcir contribulions 'to the collection center in Ihe new American Legion building at 161 Main slreet at once. TEMPELHOF AIRDR9MH5- CAPTURED Soviet Forces Reach Potsdamer Platz Region By ROBERT.MUSEL; Ujdted Press War .Correspondent April 26 German radio.said my troops "had .broken'.IhlcTUie; Potsdamer Platz. area .itV the- hcirt of Beilm only 400 yards from, the -.central headquarters where Adolf Ilitlei wis reported directing .the .defense of: his iruini ed capital. If Hitler was m the Nazis have insisted for four days was running shoit for him "Beilm was surrounded by Red Aimy tioops and by land was all but impossible The Bei- lm garrison was being' pressed in- to a tight pocket m the center of. tlio uty Airdrome is Captured Moscow dispaches slid Russian troops had overum the Tempelho't airdiome and captured a number of planes with warmed-up molois apparently preventing a last-min- ute escape flight by Nazi leaders The Hamburg radio repojted the fighting 111 the Postdamer area and in the middle oi Beilm s Tieigarten Tattering Nazi ladio lepoits in- sisted that Adolf Hitler himself and pnze lot of his henchmen wete in Beilin and a Moscow dispatch said that if Hitler is tlieie 'the Russians will have bini dead or alne -1 Thi, Russian Army Organ Red Sar referred to the Battle, of Bulm as a _mopup_ Soviet_fiqnt dispatcher said there no longer an continuous front line m the rums of the German capital Russian spr-ai heads were gouging into the heait of the city and wild fighting swirled deep behind the: Nazi barricades. Airdrome ;Overriui Moscow icported that the Tem- pclhof airdiome had been Mr tuallj overrun blocking the last haraidoiib escape hatch fiom the ci ty. Soviet the struggle swiftly approached its climax and Red Army assault forces weie duvuij, into thp heart of the city fiom east west north, and south Some SOO 000 German tioopn are rcpoited trapped in the doomed city Some 70. miles.south (if Berlin) Moscow said, other struck west across the Elbe.riv- er piauticaliy to within sight of American First Army trodpS along the Mnldc river: .Official' acotinU put the Russians 17 miles' from the First army. as of yea-- lerday. In Sixlh Day The battle of wrecked. Berlin' roared on into its 'sixth day in" wha't Soviet Front dispatches des- cribed, as a "jungle of.' above ground and in the dark, treacherous caverns of the city's, subway system below. Four more city districts were cleared yesterday and both the Spree river and 'fellow canal crossed despite ferocious counter-, attacks by the fanatic enemy gar-' r i s o n. Thirty-seven districts nearly two thirds of the (Continued on Page 4) Crane Sctool Tlio Yuma County Classroom Teachers will hold their Hireling nl the Crane school Sat- urday. April 28, :it 2 p. m.. asso- ciation official.-, announced. The chief items tin the program will be ft panel discussion of San Francisco conference and ii j'lm on the Dumbarton Oaltii pro- posals. Itrlnjf Your CLOTHES to COI.LKCTION CKNTKU. AiUrJUIC.MN LKOION RLUfl. IUI Main Ml. If you (invn tin Call and will call,   

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