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Yuma Morning Sun Newspaper Archive: July 15, 1925 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Morning Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Morning Sun, The (Newspaper) - July 15, 1925, Yuma, Arizona                             COTTON (iff NEW siipt 24.95, silver 6S 1-S, copper ft 1-4. WEATHER (By Auoclated Went and Thursday. J THE JIORNI.VG YUMA, -ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 1925 NUXBEB 183 N0RTH1STIS NOfFlffid Salt I.ake City, Reno, Pccatello, Lander Heat Records Broken To Smithereens MIDDLE WEST BOILS (By Associated Press) DENVER, July 'New heat records for'15 .years or more were holding up today .at a number of points in the Rocky Moun- tain district, the weather .bureau here announced to- night. Salt Lake City, "Heno. Nevada, and Lander, Wybm- all hottest s'nce weather .bureau records -have been kept at these -the forecaster announced. The mercury at Pocatello to 104; Reno's official ther- mometer registered 102; Salt Lake. City experienced; 102, -while, Lander, which competes frequently in winter for the cbldest .point record, .had a reading-" of 100. Man Thought Dead v Of Thirst living 1 After Treatment ....CASA GRANDE, Aril, .July Annes, 27, of Sew York City, who was found last "night In an unconscious condi-. lion from lack of water, along the Southern Pacific railroad right-of-way, 14 miles west of Chsa Grande, Is recovering rap- Idly from his narrow escape In n local hotel here. Annes -was found by H. G. Wells, section foreman .at Bon and first reports reaching here about midnight last night, stated he was brought Crande carry this morning and was. at-: tended by Dr. J. E. Redden. of this city. Annes.stated :that he, was a' hospital employe .and was hiking overland from Los Angeles to -Tucson, Saturday morning, he said, he ran' out of water, and crawled .under the railroad bridge where'he was found 24 hours later. CHICAGO, July -weather in the Middle West today contln-. ued to add to its toll of deaths and prostrations. Weather predictions tonight showed little indication of Immer rirjte. relief from the -temperatures which ranged from ._90_, ti> more than 100 except for., thunder showers In some sections St. Louis reported sc7en lior.al deaths .from -Jie heat terday and .today with slightly lower temperature today. Chicago, in the midst of the hot zone, continued'.to enjoy modr prate tnmneratures dne to a breeze blowing over the city from the lake. All. 'Dallas heat records were broken when the offic'al ther- mometer registered 105.4 this afternoon. i4 Panchp Villa, world's champion- died here-.- 'St. hospital folloWingVtlff administering of-, an preliminary' of: his" fighter..was .suffocated' hy the; fumes of the Bones of Suicide Are Found TOMBSTONE. July Scattered "by coyotes, the bones of a man "have been found by cowboys seven Tniles wpst of Ran Sfiuon. Thrnneh sVnll is a bullet hole, and near toy was fnuhd a rusted while :ft circular of the Colt Fircarmfe 'Company, found in a pocket, is evi- dence that -death was -not before 1923. Also found was a note, almost Illegible, (hot indicates that -death by suicide and that ill health :was the cause of the .deed. Thus fpr no identification of tho suicide Hias been made. BASEBALL (By Associated Prcspl JTATIONAT; MAGrE Boston G, Cincinnati 9 .New York 6, Chicago 3 Brooklyn S, Pit'sbm-gli 8 Philadelphia 6, St. L-ouis 4 AMERICAN LEAGUE Cleveland 6, Boston 1 Chicago's, New York 0 Detroit .-4, Athletics 13 St. Louis 14. Washington 3 COAST T.EAGTTE Vernon 8, Salt Lake 5 Seattle 10. San Francisco 11 .Oakland 11, Sacramento 3 'Los' Angeles-Portland, traveling Monday and the added fact that it was the 18th had nothing to do with condi- tions in Portland. The Elks held swny here on the opening day of their national convention. NEW YOIIK, an- nual national bringing into competition the and most skillful stunt .and pursuit filers til -the United States array, and civilian ranks, will be held at Mitchell field, t. I. next October 8, 9 and 10. E. 0. McDonnell, pres- ident of the New York 1925 Air Races, Inc., announced the dates today. Prizes amounting' to about will be awarded. The contest for the Pulitzer trophy will be the principal event of the meet. Special speed taiachine, now under construction embody- ing new designs and improvements hitherto, untried, are expected to shatter records. SCOPES-TRIAL Y Judge Warns Newspaper Writers o f Contempt Proceedings Because Of Premature Yarn PRAYER IS ARGUED Associated .PresaV- i DAYTON, July third day of "the Scopes evolution trial erRed amid stormy 'scenes late-- this afternoon .without the jury having been -sworn in and .before Judge .John H. Raulston had announced h is: :dejsJ6ir Oft' the defense e iridict- >lt the judge he..: left "the bench, earlier he had" representatives n.qssihie.-.cpn tempt 'of .court pro-. of 'i'ublication of 'stories the Judge would deny, defense motion' to quash. A committee OJL.viicwspapermen .was appotntedY.tq thV pre- publication. -r'A .state'ment' from .-'the Service war he'ar.d it an- .norincedi it; would judge tomorrow.: report to. the s'tprm. occurred--at ,6f waiting to learn what-the court .wpuldi do-in 'defense attempt the 3sponse_ tp'-tn j .end'-the-trial; nsgundneBS.. of ...the vl'ndjctm'Rnt. and jthe .the .Ten- The -Jaw no theory of evolution-which denies ihe Biblical story of. man's crea- Country Club Has Special Pool Rate} Tickets for' 'the Country Club, swimming pool are now on sale-at all the drug A special rate is being made by selling 10 tickets for J2.50, while one ticket costs 50 cents at the club ticket office, so It will, pay to "buy them by the bulk." With this generous rate and these warm evenings, the cool water will feel pretty good to thrjse who drive out to the Country Club for a swim now. and then. Sousa, 70 Is Too Young For Golf NEW YORK, July Phil- lip Sousa, noted bandmaster, who is 70 years old, regards himself as too young to play golf. "I'll start golfing when I can't do anything he told William Cross, a friend whom he has been visiting-at Middletown, N. Y. Whites Round Up All Japanese Laborers, Then Deport Them In Trucks And Cars TOLEDO, Oregon, July coming the resistance of armed guards of the Pacific Spruce cor- poration's mill at Toledo, Oregon, a mob of about 400 men, women and chlldren'rounded up the com- pany's Japanese laborers yester- day, loaded them and their belong- ings into motor cars and trucks and carried them beyond the coun- ty line, leaving them, to shift for themselves. No weapons were used in the fighting with the guards, but fist fights were general'and several of tho mill force and townsmen were severely, beaten. Marliii Gueriner, Charles A. Buck and W. S. Colver, alleged leaders of the mob, were arrested by Sheriff Horsfall and a deputy, and the mob dispersed. The names of at least 50 other participants were taken by the of- ficers, It was said. The trouble was the culmination of a disagreement of several weeks' standing between certain laboring groups and the company over, the employment "of Japanese labor at the co'mpanyfs sawmill. 'The march on the spruce mill followed a brief but fiery mass meeting In the streets at which agitators harran- gued the crowd. The mob was led by a man waving an American flag. None of the Japanese was injured. :tloi the judge entered the court-room after a .recess, of hour? Plane That May Fly Over the Ocean Design of the .airplane winch hunts Breguet ul Kryiure1 Insel, plans to build-fur-the imnsiitlimilc passenger service Quartet Of Principals his Fighting Fiasco, Are Pound Fine, 15 Days In Jail Fuentes, Mexican boxer, his manager, Al Lopez of (Pop) Nealis of Los Angeles, andUCharles: Garcia, promoter, arrested here the night pf July-JO'ori.-a; prize fight be- iwfeen .Fiien'fes arid'Sailor McCarthy, alleged to have been' Njck'Newmari'pf.Los.Angeles, were tried in Judge S; F: court yesterday and.found guilty. Judge-Stanley sentenced the quartet to pay fines of each and serve 15'days in jail. Herman. Lukovich of Phoenix, repre- senting the defense, immediately served notice of an- peal to.the superiot court; .and his clients put up each as .bail for their appearance. alias ..Nick did not make his and Nealis both declared they did hot know his whereabouts.' :While evidence Was presented tending .to show that or McCarthy did not try to fight and was not hit which he employed In writing htsitnat ne was not hit sufficienth. decision, ho was met before hej harfl to ranse a nothl could-make his announcement introduced into the evidence the filing of a defense motion ask- however, tending to prove that ing that the morning prayer be there was any collusion between discontinued. In addition, the rno- inientesV ixipez Nealis, and Garcia tion asked and supported its-re- quest with a signed petition from church men outside Rhea county 'hat if the. prayer opening should be continued, the court permi' Korrjo.-jninister of beliefs other tha'p those of fundamentalists to loar1 devout, appeal. so'that Newman-McCarthy wonld "do his flop." brief, the did show that Fnenfes was swinging from (be start of the bont to the finish, hut could not make Newman-Mc- Carthy open up and battle. As to how hard he was winging 'em at The_. motion was over-ruled, hut. the "high diver" was not much dis- announced tha'. cussed. Referee Kane stating, how- the Dayton'Ministerial association J.cver. that did not appear to would choose' the clergyman t'-jbe much force to the wallops., lead, the daily prayer in the The trial was formally started by the defense filing a demurrer to the complaint'as "it did not set out any particular The quar- tet (lien plead not guilty. turo. COTTON Richard Stanton was the first I city witness. j Stanton said that .he was sitting cot- close to A. Verdugo and the I Mayor of Mexican and that when the fighters came in, the Mayor (By --Associated Press) NEW The general ton market closed firm at net ad- vances of 32 to 34 points. New Orleans-rSpot cotton 24.35. 'said to Verdugo: "That's not Mc- Putnrcs: July 24.22-24.24; Oct. Carthy- -that's Nick Newman of the 24..IS-24.50: 23.98-24.00: 24.56-24.60. Dec. 24.58-24.60: March 24.30; Jan. May 'imperial Valley." and some one clsn said: "That's right, but maybe j up a better fight than __ _ t _ __ McCarthy." He said, Pnentes spar- red with McCarthy, then hit him Karl Muller of -Danville. III. on the head and the men clinched, traded coal mine Jobs for a day McCarthy going to the floor for a with a fellow workman and was nine count. He described the killed by falling rock knockout and said thnt in his was not bit hard  vcrc In tlidr homo Sunday. i NEW W. Field nnd George IV. Morse, former heads of two brokerage firms which failed for n total of In J922, sentenced In Federal Court (o serve one year and one day each In Atlanta prison. Williamson Cnnnty, scene of blltcr facUonnl wars, has returned to peaceful ways, ns n result, It Is believed of simple religions exhortations of Rev. Howard S. WDllams evangelist, whn has just closei a seven woks' revival. NEW wnlcr main flnodrd three sulmays and spec lal precautions taken lo protec properly as well as life In tbj vicinity of Flflh Avenue and Fnrty-sorond street. Streets have bees ropfd off and traffic dl verted. NEW YORK-Census figures shov that New A'srk City Ims a pop ulntluu of W.F.Martin, Once Head Of Arizona Masons, Succumbs PRESCOTT, William John Martin. 71, pioneer mining man of Prescott and of- the Crown King district, died nt Sa'rannoh, Mo., Sunday. Sews of his death was received here today by his widow. Mr. Martin was the grand master of Arizona Mnsons at one time nni) held numerous other high positions In fraternal nnd cltlc life. In 1909 he con- structed the famons Poland tun. net between Walker and Poland Junction, Arizona, and was the associate of Frank Murphy, fa- mous "empire bander" of north- ern Arizona. Mr. Martin iras born at St. Suvern parish, Cornwall, Eng- luiid, oud was a mining engineer by. profession. The funeral will be held Thursday under the aus- pices of the Masonic lodge. BUSMP mm .'.Jni.. less cqn'difipris' during 1924. left Ittlc rpbhv fbrvcOTnplalnt pri.'.the. part American sec- retary. -today; in he. fore-word of the commerce 'lartmcnt's" 'official -history of the Publication of this lipwu as the department year book ion rand the. iatiqii's-' trade -coincided., with- thei-. announcement, of foreignHfade fiff- ures'disclosing a balance SlASfl in favor of States in the last' fiscal year. Mrs. Ranisey Given Check For Al Clonts, local agent for the Sew. York Life Insurance Com- pany, delivered a check for 'cstcrday to Mrs. Wade Ramsey, vidow of Wade Hamsey who died n the Yuma hospital June 26, rep- resenting the proceeds .of a life nsurance policy on the life .of Mr. tarasey. The local agent Immediately filed he claim upon death ot-Mr. Ram- :ey and the check was signed In York July Iflth, and delivered The policy on Mr. Ramsey's "life bad only existed four months be- :ore his death.. STATE STOCK BODY RESIGNS Three Members Refuse To Reconsider Action In Ousting Dr. Douglas As Veterinarian REPUDIATE HUNT CBy Associated Press) PHOENIX, July Unwilling to reconsider their action of June 9, when they declared the of- fice of state veteirinariaTi. members of state live" stock san- itary 'board sent to. Head of Children's Home Passes Away PHOENIX, July W. J. Brooks, superintendent of the Ari- zona Children's home at Tucson, ilieii suddenly at Prescott this morning while on a tour of the state in the interest of the home, according to word received here by ocal relatives. Mr. Brooks has been a resident of Arizona for the past sixteen yours coming here from Ohio. He ived in the Salt River valley for the major portion of that time having moved to Tucson last Jan- uary when hs accepted the posi- tion of superintendent of the chil- dren's home. Dusseldorff held a celebration recently in commemoration of Germany's possession of the Rhineland for_ a century. At the L-meeting.-if Aboard morning', :the; mem'b'ers' were. asked by Qoyefubr.iHunt consider to con- v tinue Dr. Dbugliis in "that" r.Tlie declared fore leavitfg' ;-.his of floe.- for-'the. night that no 'action bad' been-''taken iipbn the.'resignatfpris.'ahd 'consequently. them. action would .be" takeh-.when they :Th'e. membersi board 'are iicKinney, I... L. I 'Neal and P.'i'T, '-V...-.r The followed .an'-'bperi nieelihg wh'ch a hiiniber.of p'rpmin'ent.'cat-. tic'.'men that Douglas -be-.'kcnt'Vin -of- .Tlie' 'cattle men vdeclared. industry was'taja. pgrirous. situation, and, welfare1 of the industry demanded change in ficbv'pf .veterinarian at the" '.of the- board -when queried bv.. Ooveruor Hunt then declared that. Dr. Douglas. wa- inconsistent in carrying out. thr scabies'qn'irantine regulations and allowed Roiiin stock to be shipped and refuserl to allow others to he moved. "wine: their statement. Qov-.: ernni-.Hunt aslfod tho hoard "mem-.. hers .tn reconsnlor tl'eir decision. opinion from Attorney Gen- eral Murijhy was 1'auded down to.- day affirming tho right 'of thr bonrd tn declare thn offrce vacant, and declaring, that Dr. Douglas was not entitle'! to pay sim e the time tbn ar-iinn" was taken 9 Dr. Douglas has COBtlutied to hold rhp.'office, since that. time. Novelist Is Here Getting Dat? Yuma had rather a distinguished- visitor Monday, when Ford M. Jack, novelist from San Francisco, came to Yuni.a on a briof business trip. Mr. Jack was hero to get in- formation concerning tho Colorado Kivt'r and HouidfT Dam. the in- ti-ri'sts to which he is going to In- cli'de in Ills next novel. He cinie also in connection with tin. filming nf "The Winning of Barbara which is to be thn pictiirp nf the year, it has hcpn said. It was reported that the El Ceu- tro Irrigation District has.offered to assist in the making of tho plc- turc. and that some of the Yuma Indians are to appear In the pro- logue when the film Is first shown at Orauman's Million Dollar Thea- tre in Los Angeles. Judge Raulston, "Monkey Case" Jurist Gives His Conception of Ideal Judge DAYTON. Tenn., July John T. Raulston. presiding at the Scopes trial here today gave bis conception of the necessary qual- ifications of a judge in an inter- view granted !to newspaper re- porters. "In the maintenance of a repub- lican form of. government it Is es- sential that powers be distributed Into legislative, judicial and execu- tive said the Judge. "The judicial department has no concern as to the motives, wisdom or policy of statuts. therefore it. should be absolutely'non-political. No person should be elevated to judicial office because -of "his pol- itical affiliation or partisan activ- ities. "Ftness and temperament, legal attainments and character ebould be. paramount in the selection all judicial officers. "Sneaking more in detail a Judge should be industrious, patient, con- scientious, courageous and firm. He should be well grounded la tho fundamentals of the law and his character should br- absolute and superlative. the very nature of thing-i there can be no such combination as a dishonest individual and an honest judge in the same person- ality. The standards of dishonesty- and those of integrity are too in- crssistant and incompatible- t? ao- the- sair.8 mind. "A should diver! himself n! all prejudices, suppress.all pas- Mon within and have one purpose ami cim> and that is to find :lm truth nnd to de'slare   

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