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Yuma Morning Sun Newspaper Archive: July 14, 1925 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Morning Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Morning Sun, The (Newspaper) - July 14, 1925, Yuma, Arizona                             COTTON SEW rotfou bar S-S, copper U 1-8. WEATHER (By Tuesday and Wednesday. JfUMBBB ICC lit." THE MORMXG TUESDAY, 14, HEAT KANSAS CORN Lack of Moisture Likely To Kill Crop There; Severe Storms Cause High Property Loss ALONE IN HIS GLORY PHOENIX HOTTEST (By Associated Press) CHICAGO, July weather, lightning and 'took a; toll of iiipward of a score of lives :ih the Middle. West -during .the past 24 ..hours, while 'dry weather in .sortie sec- tions and severe storms in 'Others caused a crop and property loss of several 'hundred thousand-dollars.- With temperatures ranging. from to more than 100.' Omaha" and reported death's; 'St. Louis vicinity seven 'and :at Slielhina, Missouri, three tarm-" ere were killed by .lightning! Lightning also killed two in the .northwest. V Kansas' reported- that its "'corn; 'crop is' suffering from excessive heat and .lack of moisture, while more that a score of forest .flrps were raging in Oregon -whore they .were- started by lightning.' 'ant' heavy storms, in the northwest 'which brought temporary relief .the heat, but did much dam- :age to crops and to property. Hail- accounted for much of" the 'damage. While- the rest of the. middle 'west sweltered with no immediate "l-roppects for relief; Chicago which had from heat, today enjoyed norm'a1 -summer due to- a yary- 'iug of the wind which blow over ..the city from Lake Michiga'n. DENVER, July A heat wave 'continued to hold the Rocky "Mountain region In a torrid grip. Temperatures in several states isoared to 'unheard of heights'. Denver with 95 degrees suf- fered it's hottest day' in 1926. Phoenix with a maximum of 112 degrees was the .warmest city the -region., ...The .heat, wavr its torrid .temperatures re- ccordefl as. unusual for the region over four states, Colo- rado, Wyoming, Montana and Arl- rzona. New Mexico, with the exception Albuquerque which had a max- imum temperature of 90, seems to Tiavc escaped the torrid. .weather. Cheyenne reported a maximum -.temperature .of 92 degrees. ARE RECEIVED Statements certifying the titles and numbers of the proposed con- stitutional amendment and the re- ferred measure, which the legisla- ture has referred to the voters of the state in a special election to be held September 29, 1325, have been received by Mrs. Clara A. Smith, clerk of the board of super- visors. The statements give the num- bers and titles of the two bills to be voted on by the people and a sample copy of the official ballot to. be used in the election. This statement is the authorization to the supervisors of each county to proceed witli arrangements for the holding of the special election in the state. The statement certifies that the proposed amendment to the con- stitution which will'amend the con- stitution so that a workmen's com- pensation act. may be enacted, and the referendum ordered by the seventh legislature for the repeal of the fish and game code are the only two bills to be placed on the ballot. The proposed constitutional amendment will be numbered on the ballot as follows: 100 yes and 101 no, while the fish and game law referendum will be numbered, and C 0 0 N NEW general cotton market closed steady at net ad- vances of 51 to 56 points. New colton 24.05. 23.90: Oct. 2-1.14- 2-1.17; Dec. H4.25-2-I.27; Jan. 23.6S- 23.G9; March 23.9S. -i.-; .j, -Jasper .Chamberlain ivas-Mlv. Browii academy >f East iClngstbui' N.; he only member .of the graduatiii! wasichisX-valedictorlah.. poel. when It come ther the roll and. ehdetl. with, bis name: a and music, nT1 in honor Inir.clufis of one.., IOIEYCASE UP TO JUDGE Uncle Sam To Keep His Weather Eye On Brewers Turning Out High Power Beer, j (By Associated Press) Retires To Chambers To Decide If Indictment Shall Be Quashed; Day Filled With Oratory LA WYEBS TALKATIVE Another bald-faced lie by one who appears to be the publicity (representative of interests in .a Mexican town near Yuma who are intent upon placing Sart Luis re- sort clubs in the -wrong light so they themselves may enjoy the trade which is going there has been nailed by The 'Morning Sun. There is absolutely no founda- tion for a dramatic story, carryr ing a big head-line, pub? iished in an afternoon newspaper here Monday to the effect that, one of the desperado '.rum the recent' Moss Landing, Califor- nia shooting affray here. is'b'ei.ng harbored in San Luis.'- y' -1 Last week! at Moss .Cal- ifornia, a hand of rum'" runners fought a battle with officers, killing .one and wounding -two others.' One of the men escaped in a' cream- colored car bearing California license No. 100s. Sheriff Oyer of Monterey county wired Sheriff Chappell the man was headed this way. Immediately, Undersheriff Billy Dunne threw out a net-to catch him. Officers were sent to the border line at San. Luis, and the quaran- tine station officers on both sides 'of the line given 'a description of the man and the vehicle he was supposed to be traveling in. San Luis was combed by .both Mexican and American officers for the ruin runner. He was flot and is not there. The- story in the local paper of yesterday recited dramatically .how the man had come to the Califor- nia quarantine station, and because of being armed, wanted, and'fear- ing inspection, wheeled his car and went to Andrade anu from there to San Luis. No cream-colored car bearing California license 100S has been seen "by the California quarantine 'station as the officers there have been watching for the vehicle and have placed the driver un- .rter arrest. Neither has any such car come to the station, turned around and driven toward Aodrade. A check of the Arizona quaran- tine station shows that uo such car had ever crossed the bridge into this state. Local officers say it would be impossible for the rum runner and his car to get from Andradei to San Luis unless he alid his ma- chine were hitched an ni.r- plane and. thus taken across'the Colorado river: (fly Associated Press) DAYTONf July; 13 Judge J. I, Rauiston, pre- siding at' the trial of.-John T-. Scopes on a' charge of violating the law of the' state of Tennessee -making it a misdemeanor to teach theories o.f evolution in the, public schQols, retired to tonight ;to "study.; ".the question of .whether, the indictment against" the 24-year-old ;teacher shallbe summarily "The Judge..'carried with .him portions of the half-score .pbitlts by the contending Sides In Avhtle ringing in. --his cars were words .from, six oral arguments presented to during the day.. It first of perhaps other "days "to be devoted entirely .to oratory. The jury, service Soon the Juror R: wither "he had '.opinion.. as to the guilt .or. innpoence' .do; fendant, '.the jury. was. sent from 'room'. that' argument-.mightrbe made on the. '-.to qu.ash. Gentry went with'-his fellow, jury- men after declaring that he Could not recall having said; that Scopes should not be convicted. The day of sp'eech' making Was brought to a close -by the tw.o most extended arguments ot the trial.. .Attorney -General' Stewart and Clarence Barrow taking "up the .entire .afternoon session with their discussions of.the' soundness j WASHiNGTXIN, July j government .is preparing to laiinch-a new campaign to atop the-deluge of high power beer. New regulations "a're being drawn looking to more drastic action against the brewer of the illicit commodity. They are -intended to he 81 definite and positive as to.assure speedy action by the United. Statet attorneys in court proceedings against violators: of the -beer sec-i tion of .the national dry law. A. system of intelligence by ;which the brewers, may be kept under constant., surveillance hap been worked out, and the removal from' such a plant..of high power i.Loe.r or any beer containing more than one-half of, one per cent of alcohol by volume will be cause for action naqnts. by the prohibition WASHINGTON, July storm of applications, suggestions] and demands for appointments Breaks Through Ledge under the reorganized federal pro--j Qf Conglomerate Into Pocket of Formation With Oil Traces hihition enforcement is waiting tonight to break over the desk of I Assistant Secretary Andrews 6' the treasury upon his return to- morrow from a vacation; With the approach of. the defi- rite date of che list of men desig- nated as available for _ the lim- llef number of cxccKtiv'c assign- ments has mounted rapidly. A considerable number of these r.ames have been presented by h-emhers of the House and Senate spite announcement that tlir treasury desired -through the re- organization to eliminate to some extent the question of .patronage. SKpwlIporMayNat I Tills-rtiorning at 10. o'clock will either see one .of two thJBgs in Judge Stanley's coiiii. .Tliere will be foiir men; one.-box-, er. one promoter and two managers o.f trial .of framing- 's fight here July-.10, between.Toiiy Fueiiies 'there he.: ono ?man, Charles the alleged .promoter of the bout. .Some .have tlie. opinion that Fuente's. Al Lopez, manager, of Mc- Newman, will -take-a forfeit the bail money .which .'they.- p'nt'.np; .while others-seem 'to think 'they will -'ap- .licaT and tight case. you take it, Charley Oarcia. the local: boy, is the goat, tf the men tfiai'ltnd are found? guilty, Garcia will be I found -if they don't, Garcia will be the only one "hold- ing the sack." Secretary Clmmhcrlftln denied government contemplating 'severing relations wllh Russia; MONTREAL. Government has canceled order appointing committee to consider designs for Canadian ilntr for use ashore. NOTPREPARED (By A ssnrln ted "WASH mO TON, July rmrfwl by specific.presidential ap: :prova! of thp policy lie 1ms mapped nut for denling with Clilneso prob- lems, Pecreifiry Kallopg was bock from liiai vacation tortny. Availing1 re- anlts or conferences in'Peking olsev.'liero .through which tho pro- .loeol writers-.are expected.to de- vise "ways and moans of Insuring the protection of their nationals in China. There was no indication that-the diplomatic conferences in various capitals has as yet reached n stage tho exact RonrBn to be fol- lowed rrouid he forecast. Secretary .Keiiogg pointed out after ,his tipnfereflce with President Coplidge. jast week j at the sumriler White Ho'use, .tiie-_ policy of the Washington govern- ment-was opposed to a desire id give effect to the commitments into which it has entered with respect, to China at the Washington arms limitation conference. DRILLERS ELATED of the Tennessee law placing evo- lution theories under the ban tnso- far as public. schools were con- cerned. S. P. Worker From Here Is Injured Jose- Hojas. a. Southern Pacific employe from Yuma, -was-found to- day lying near the railroad tracks, in.Pomona, suffering from injuries expected to prove has .reached 'here. At the Pomona hospital it .was stated that Hojas' skull was frac- tured, one arm was hroken in four places and his head was severely lacerated. Hojas was traveling on a rail- road pass and it is believed he fell from the train on which he'-was a passenger. f This County to Organize Izaak Walton League of America Chapter Mnry Webber, of Kcoknk, Iowa, nnrt Prof. Barstoiv Grlffis, of Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh married here; they met abroad an'ocean liner on the way lo London. Out'to .bring.-home the bacon from the game and fish hogs of this vicinity, "sportsmen of Yuma have today decided to organize a chap- ter of Ihe'Isaak-Walton League of 'America, a national organization .'whose sole purpose is'to preserve what is left of our out of doors. Mr. E. B. Keelan, prominent local business man has .received a let- ter from national headquarters of this organization explaining the plan and enclosing a" charter ap- plication The "Isaak Walton League, 'the j letter to Mr. Keelan explains, is -a non-commercial, .non-political and non-religious body "of men and women, who realize that .our woods, f water and wild life are vanishing I and who have formed a national progrrii entirely practical for the elimination of water pollution, game violations and the continued deforestalion of our woodlands. This program includes a town to county, county to stale and slale lo nation plan of progression, the first thing of its kind ever intro- duced to the American public. .Three years ago this League was conceived and founded by Will H. Dilg, its national president, at a meeting, of 54 Chicago sportsmen. Since that time the League has i organized active, units in j cities and towns throughout the j United State's.. Despite its short existence league has introduced and passed j many bills of .vital importance to national and state conservation of! oru national resources. Notably the Upper Mississippi River Wild Life and Fish Refuge bill, passed by the last Congress which provides for the purchase and maintenance of 150 miles of Mississippi River bottom' land ex- tending between Rock Island, Ill- inois, and Lake Pepin, Minnesota. needs this organization. If other titles throughout the coun- try can do things, we can do them and every sportsman is asked to cooperate with Mr. Keelan in or- ganizing a chapter here. Through the hard cong- lomerate and into brown has fine indi- cations of oil in paying quantities1 a little bit below it.' v Such was the'fine, news brqughtrinto The Morning Sun office at o'clock today by B. W.. Sinclair; who had'a small filled with the .stuff .thru .which: the-, drill is -now churning at a' rapid rate'; It 'Was slippery brown shale, such as is .found near big pools, of nil, and tile oil men-in charge of the well were highly elated.when it ran out into .the sunip. U-p to a late .hour last night, the drill .was grinding .away. feet of the hardest, conglomerate the1, drillers had in' hundreds 'of wells: It'was" so touglr that a number of the :caseT hardened drills were off daily, and hnt three to five, -feet could be drilled in a working sjitft; Sunday was' on'e of the hardest1 days on drills the outfit 1ms iever experienced, the drill being pulled out three straight-times. Last nighi. the drill slin'ue'd. Into .tiic brown shale formation, at S o'clock. -The. sump immediatelyibei gan 'to show traces .of oil, .and there every indication that the pool-will be struck before the drill goes rnauy iriore hundred feet. BASEBALL NO WONDER SHE SMILES fBy Associated Press) XAMOJfAL LEAGUE New York 3, Chicago 1 Brooklyn 4' Boston 1, Cincinnati' 4 Philadelphia 3, St. Louis Chicago S, New York 4 Cleveland 11, Boston 12 Detroit 1, Athletics 4 St. Louis 0..'Washington 4 Sheriff Chappell Slightly Improved Sheriff Jim Chappell is feeling some better, but is still confined to his bed. Such was the information re- ceived by telephone Sunday eve- ning by Undersheritf Billy Dunne. Sheriff Jim is having quite a hard fight at Loma Linda, it is said, and is so weak that it will be quite a while before iie gets back to normal. Sheriff Jim told Billy .that a large number of Yuma people had been to visit him since his illness at Loma Linda. In library of Royal Acronnntlcal Society, nn- Tciled by Ambassador Honghton it honors memory of British nni Americans who lost lives hi de- struction of dirigible R-88. Piping Hot News From All Over the World A3IHERST, slondi affected by young girls Is mallg-- nant thrent to their health, Mrs: Ida told home dem- onstration agrents in four-day conference here. IKMANAI'OLIS-John F. Single- ton, 28, of Chlcaffo, chosen presi- dent of Baptist Yonng People's Union of America, In convention Iiere. VALPARISO, of Clillenn schooner Falcon, ship- wrecked In liny, 1924, rescued from lone Island In Smith Seas nnd brought here. RIDGE, Art. City aronsed over burial of poodle flog In cemetery; casket containing hiidr dug up and moved. VANCOUVER, B. fanned hy high raging nenr Bornn; Carlisle nnd Stciirnsvllle, logging towns, en. d lingered. PHILADELPHIA 3Ir. and Mrs. Fritz Chandler cat trip abroad short by a month to reiurn for funeral of Evn .Riley, 45, ivho has been in their employ for 14 years. HOLYOKE, Oliver, 55; kllloil by nnto' driven by KHzn- beth Flaherty, 16; F.ngcne K. Guard, owner of machine, arrest- ed for allowing minor nnder Ifi years of nge to drive automobile, i of bnnk messenger, who dlsnnpeared three months found crantmed Into closet In home of Bougart, promin- ent Marseilles physician. Dulln, American artist noted for illustrations of children's taJrj-'taies, rapidly be- coming fannrnfi here. tinman In sitting. position and ivlth hands clnsprd "prayerfully, to Ire 200 years or more old, iannil. Hn'nraiclr, 24, and "Mrs. Lillian Martin, 25, returned to Danville, III., on bank rob- bery charge: Implicated by com- panion, John Kreder, who con- fessed. nnd home- owners alarmed by ravages of tfrmlte nuts, which threaten to destroy many wooden bnildlngs. Many new styles In men's dress in London's open season gains momentum; opera capes, cut Inverness style, and sheer handkerchiefs for evening wear. .1) OXTERET, Mex. Government planning new highway between Monterey and Saltillo, distance of SO miles, M. Konsjevifsky, nntfil orr.hestro conductor, England bus real musical ml- tnre, whllp America only vnst musical Intellect. CANTERBURY, Payment o fees for entrance to Canterbnr Cathedral stopped; volnntar contributions expected to mnk good deficit resulting from no-fee edicl. Kitty Kiernan, fiance o Miclmel Collins. Irish Free Stat leader assnsslnnled Ihree year fiiro, nmrriefl to Major Genera t'ronln, quartermaster general I Free State army. Jnmes Oliver Cnrwood famous Ainrrlcui! novelist, wit Mrs. Cnnvood nnd Jnmes OHie Jr., visiting here. 10XPON Two pygmy mice froi Goinhin, IVest Africa, .so sma they L'ws comfortably In matr box, added to zoo f nmllv. and milk on diet tltnt Oojab, 12-yrar-oI pygmy elopimnt In London zo will By telephone to .Ickert of Hoboken, N le news thai she wa- ete; sum'61 eri uncle, Morris Zlegler of Pbll delDhia.'-i. i "Ply-Field Is one of the beat of s kind in the country and nothing n the'-United. Slates will equal It purpose when the necos improvements are made aid Colonel William Milchell held f Aerial Corps II unday morning after carefully in peeling the locil flying field Oolonel ed; to --Yuma, by Lieutebant Harry Veddington and a squadron Judge Peter T Robertson, Col- nel B! i? ny (after whom the eld is named) and other promln- nt citizens met the distinguished viators when .they alighted here: Colonel Mitchell, in.charge .of the overnment's aviation affairs, from an Antonio to -pro- ounced Fly Field' one .of. the best n -the service, lanne'r of good thjngs for the ulti late success of it. lie 'find..his fellow, aviators were oyally 'entertained while, here, and opped 'off at- 6 a. morning for Sau Diego. Judge Stanley Makes Solomon-Like Rujing etf a r'eguiaf Solomon' -yesterday deciding; .a' family .-jar which wound up., in two ohu. and. Florenzo Molinp, .being charged with drunkenness and dls- urbing the peace. It developed during the trial that Fohn had not been treating, his disters as they thought he'should, and also not ponying up his share )f the expenses, so Judge Stanley he would get probation .for iix months with the understanding f he drank any tequila or failec lo help out, in the jail he woulc ro for. a term. Floreuzo, who md been putting up toward their support, got off free. P. J. Levine and Mike Shorty ;ot fines-each for being tanked ip. They paid. M. D.' Murchison, drunk, drew ?10 fine and had to pay for kicking the side of the tari out he was hauled to jail in.. J. L. Brown got nicked for reckless driving. Chief Is Commended For Nabbing Boxers Letters and wires of congratula tion are pouring in daily.to Chie of Police Henry Levy commendini his admirable stand in the boxin; fiasco here Friday night and th action he took to protect th sportsmen of this city from fur ther outrages. A wire from Jerome, Arizona reads as follows: "Congratulations. Keep the good work up. Yours fo clean boxing. Jerome Boxing Con mission." Another came from Tom Sheril head of the Idaho Athletic Con mission, commending Chief Lev highly for his handling of tho si nation and declaring that mcr action of similar nature was taken the sport, would be placed an kept on the high plane it deserve Other similar letters and wire came from Mexican. Oregon. No Mexico, and California. iecretary: Hoover Says California, Ariz o n a Must Quickly Iron Out Difficulties DELAY DISASTROUS (By Associated Presal LOS ANGELES, July 13 Hoover in a tatement issued here to- ay charged California and Arizona to iron out their Iirficulties with the states f the Northern Colorado iver basin over division of waters so that irrigation, ower and flood control on the riven might Toceed Tho failure of the California igtslatuie to ratify the compact ith ithe northei n states he said ill most probabls delay aid from le' federal government and has foked opposjtlon, from the jrthem states which Is 'likely" pe very damaging" Thp needs the Imperial Tal- lyi and I os Angeles dept ndenf pon the river developments" he aid are not prohibitive and any el ay'courts ..disaster; 'As I have stated on manv oc asjoas (Turiiu. tht jwst three s .1 hehnie that if full con lation is ghen to the com- infed inlprestl nf large storage -fof-i.-flood.- control, power and the iipph of doranstjr water to the oa Anreles d strict the first :ep development of the Co'o- ado nvei would the construe- on of a high, dam it either buldcr. as-.ths. ngineers mlBht determine Other emandr, oh tho. river "either-above r 'below woMld" hot-be interfered hv. such construction if it Is conceived. Tt is -my ieW-that .K-'hlsh.-dam. is urgently, eetleil. now ahd, for the neit S5 ears accomplish, the wstiint. at the earliest irmengi .iinj-.hQJied M (he federal unuhl "undeitake or nlv contribi IL. to thib develop mnut because it. involves tremen- oiis interstate and group interests ovorin'i storage, irrigation, power municipal .waters, .and Vill o so much buman life tlepen- dcut upon it. that it shbi Id be some authorfiy 'n the'in- erest 01 all. However, the: first and foremost" hing needed in the Colorado river s'constructive cooperation. Politics visl not.build dams or canals." IfSUISlfPEP (By Associated Press) NEWARK, N. J., July 12- light-heavyweight title liaU'h between Paul Berlenbach. present champion, and Youns ilnrullo. of New Orleans, was stop- led by referee Lewis in the ninth round, tonight and declared no :ontest. Referee Lewis in an official statement after the fight said ooth men were stalling and that he declined to allow them to con- Innc. Placer Mining In Sonora Is Revived NOGALBS. July mln- 'ng is being revived near Llano, 'snora, Mexico, and a once pro- ductive Held' near there is now be- ing worked by typical Alaskan fashion by minors from Alaska anj California, it is stated by Hugo W. Miller. local atsayer. who returned here today after Inspecting mining property owned by him and asso- ciated in that district. Those reopening the placer field state that the dirt which 13 being is yielding about a yard. Is capable of furnishing homes to only mort> persons; lord Raglan de- clnrfii- In answer to Inquiry In HriiNii refer- enre to available land there.   

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