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Yuma Daily Sun: Thursday, April 14, 1977 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 14, 1977, Yuma, Arizona                             Yuma County's agriculture worth million to economy Special to The Sun Agriculture is booming in Yuma County, with cash receipts from crops, livestock and livestock products ex- ceeding million. Bill Embree. president. Yuma County Farm Bureau, said final 1975 figures now show that crops were harvested from a record-breaking 299.040 acres of land, the largest har- vest in the county's history. The county is first in the state in production of lettuce, oranges, lemons, cantaloupe and honeydew melons; second in American Pima cotton, grapefruit, wheat, dry onions, all hay and alfalfa, cabbage and cauliflower. Yuma County ranks third statewide in production of safflower. corn, watermelons and cattle; fourth in sugarbeets; fifth in sheep and lambs: and sixth in barley and sorghum. All of Yuma County's crops are harvested from only 4'c of the total county land area. Cash receipts from crops alone contributed S158.8 million to the economy in 1975. Yuma County grew enough cotton to make 68.6 million men's shirts. The 85.400 bales harvested were valued at million. The yield per acre in both upland and American Pima cotton exceeded the national average by two and three times respectively. More than tons of wheat, valued at million, was harvested. This represents 27'c of the total state crop. Yuma County raised 56'c of all lettuce grown in Arizona. The 24.000 tons of "Yuma" lettuce alone were valued at S34.9 million. Melon production in the categories of can- taloupe, honeydew and watermelon contributed 811.7 million to the county's economy. Yuma raised lo'c of all corn grown in Arizona, and of all hay and alfalfa grown in the state. Yuma is also noted for its dry onion crop, which was valued at S1.7 million and added up to 28'c of the state total. The county's 123.000 head of range, feeder and dairy cattle had a total value of S23.9 million. The hides alone from those cattle, if processed, would have produced 1.7 million pairs of men's shoes. There were 46.300 head of sheep and lambs, valued at million: and the county ranks seventh in production of hogs and pigs, valued at Second only to Maricopa County in total production. Yuma County plays a vital role in the state's agricultural economy. A fifth of the county's em- ployment base or 5.450 persons is directly employed by the agricultural industry. Yuma County contains 10.020 square miles of land, with only 6.7cc privately owned. More than 4'r of the private land is in agriculture. During the past 20 years, agricultural acreage has in- creased 66'V from 170.000 irrigated acres in 1955. to 299.040 harvested acres in 1975. Several specific areas in the county are devoted to agriculture. Parker, surrounded by the 100.000- acre Colorado River Indian Reser- vation, grows melons, lettuce, cotton, wheat, barley and alfalfa, primarily on land leased from the Indian tribes. Farmers in the vicinity of Yuma produce much of the county's marketable produce on more than 280.000 acres of irrigated land. East of Yuma. Wellton's economy is almost entirely based on agriculture. Hay and grains are the predominant crops here, while McElhaney Cattle Co. has-a capacity for iS.OOO head of feeder cattle in its feed lots, plus numerous pastures for additional cattle during winter months. This operation alone employs 100 persons. economy also relies on agriculture, with most residents in the area employed in citrus and vegetable growing and processing. Statewide, crops and livestock are produced on of Arizona's 72 million acres. Livestock grazes on 45 million acres alone. The Slate's 51 feedlots represent a million investment, placing Arizona among the top 10 feedlot states in the entire nation. In December 1975. for example. Yuma County had head of cattle in Yuma-area feedlots. rhe yuMA H twiy SUN SUN 130th Issue, 74th Yeor Yuma, Arizona, Thurs., Apr. T4, 1977 SENTINEL 26th Issue, 105th Year Carter scraps plan for tax rebate STEVEDORES ON STRIKE Boxcar-size containers lined up in orderly rows stand idle (foreground) at the Weehawken, N.J., pier of Seatrain Lines Inc. today as a strike by thousands of East Coast stevedores against seven major shipping companies went into effect. The strike, aimed at companies which handle containerized shipments, is expected to curtail trade between the U.S. and Europe. (AP Laserphoto) East Coast stevedores strike could curtail European trade NEW YORK (API The strike by thousands of East Coast stevedores against seven nmjui shipping com- panies is expected to sharply curtail trade between the United States and Europe. Most North Atlantic cargo travels in the boxcar-sized containers which lie at the heart of the midnight Wednesday walkout by the In- ternational Longshoremen's Association. The brunt of the strike fell on the port of New York, including neigh- boring New Jersey, where ships from the three domestic lines and four foreign companies utilize docks. A spokesman at the New York Waterfront Commission said there was no immediate evidence of the strike, but that of New York's longshoremen who work on the affected docks were expected to strike, the Waterfront Commission said. The walkout was called at all Atlantic and Gulf coast ports from Maine to Texas, but there was resistance to the strike in districts south of North Carolina. Ralph Massey, an ILA district president in Houston, said Gulf coast and South Atlantic locals would not honor the walkout call because their Energy conservation plan getting the final touches contract is valid until Sept. 30, "and we're going to live with it until Sept. 30." However, Paul Guillory, vice president of a Louisiana local, termed Massey's statement "just one man's opinion. lie said that no ships of the seven companies were in port today but that longshoremen in his state would follow the strike call if such ships arrived. He added that it would affect only 5 to 10 per cent of the business at New Orleans. The strike is aimed at companies which handle containerized shipments. Although other lines were to be left free to continue operations, a spokesman for the Council for North Atlantic Shipping Associations said the strike have a substantial impact." The dispute stems from a clause in the contract which permitted longshoremen to open cargo con- tainers, unload the contents, then repack the containers before they were transported. WASHINGTON (API President Carter has decided to scrap his con- troversial plan to give tax rebates to 200 million Americans because he is convinced the economy will improve without the stimulus, administration sources said today. White House Press Secretary Jody Powell indicated that the report is true and that Carter's proposed 52 billion investment tax credit is being scrapped as well. "11 you withdraw the rebate, you couldn't very well not withdraw the business tax benefit also." Powell said. "If you don't need the one, you don't need the other." Carter reportedly made the decision to scrap the plan Wednesday night after top economic advisers convinced him that the economy is perking up without the rebates. Critics of the plan, including Federal Reserve Board Chairman Arthur Burns, had warned that it would fuel inflation. A White House spokesman refused to comment on the reports, which were carried today in several newspapers. Congressional leaders were not immediately available for comment. The Los Angeles Times said Carter was expected to announce today that he was withdrawing both the rebate proposal and a billion investment tax credit for industry. The two proposals are major segments of his proposed economic stimulus program for this year. The Baltimore Sun reported Carter had been considering the move for the past two days, and finally reached his decision at a meeting with top advisers Wednesday night. The paper said the President was advised to move quickly so the way would be cleared for consideration of his anti-inflation proposals, which he is unveiling at a news conference Friday. The New York Times said the strongest advocates of withdrawing the rebate plan were budget director Bert Lance and Treasury Secretary W. Michael Blumenthal. But top Carter administration of- ficials had staunchly defended the rebates in speeches this week. Labor Secretary Ray Marshall, speaking Tuesday in Detroit, defended the rebates as important to the nation's economy. He warned, "We should not underestimate the Effects on consumer coniidcncc if they are deprived of the ERA defeat in Florida dims ratification hopes TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (API The defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment in Florida, where supporters had hoped to break through a Southern bloc of opposition, dimmed hopes for ratification in 1977. With the defection of three key senators who switched their votes Wednesday, and despite telephone lobbying from former First Lady Betty Ford and the White House, Florida became the eighth state to vote against ratification this year. At the same time, legislatures in WASHINGTON (API President Carter's energy advisers are scram- bling to put final tpuches on a tough set of proposals designed to open a new era of energy conservation among Americans. Carter will initial the final plan by Monday, then hold a nationally televised fireside chat Monday night to discuss the energy problem. Next Wednesday, the President will lay out specifics of the energy plan in an address to a joint session of Congress. to be televised. Meanwhile, congressional and ad- ministration sources privately spelled out some details of the plan, which is sure to encounter some bitter resistance in both houses of Congress. Among the proposals still before the President is a standby 10-cent-a-gallon BULLETIN The body of Aaron Andrew Adame, 6, has been recovered from the Coachella Canal into which his dirt bike slipped last Saturday, officials said. Meanwhile the search continues for Jerome Herman Keller Jr., 24, of Santee, who officials said apparently drowned while swimming Saturday a half-mile from where the Adame boy went in. The weather High yesterday Low this morning Temperature 11 a m today '2 High today nidWIj Lw tonight mid 50? High tomorrow mid Pns Relative humidity 11 am. Average this dale M Average low this date Forecast for Yuma and vicinity: Mostly sunny, breezy and cooler, hut with occasional cloudiness this afternoon. Mostly clear and slightly cooler tonight. Fur with little temperature change Friday. West winds 10-20 m.p.h. this afternoon with occasional gusus to near 2o m p h late this afternoon, decreasing tonight. increase in the federal gasoline tax to take effect in 1979 if there is no significant decline in U.S. gasoline consumption. Another 10 cents a gallon per year would be added up to a proposed maximum 50-cent increase. The federal tax on each gallon of gasoline is now four cents. Sources emphasized that the President would receive only standby authority to raise taxes. YRMC expansion bids low enough to cover all plans The low bid opened yesterday was so low that hospital officials believe all of their proposed construction will be affordable. Plans include finishing the third (top) floor of Yuma Regional Medical Center and remodeling the pediatrics and obstetrics wards of the old hospital. Dr. Dale F. Webb. Hospital Dist. 1 board chairman, said board members were pleased that high costs would not limit their plans. When the third floor opens, the number of beds will jump from 164 to 220. Webb said. He added that the two old wards badly need to be updated. The low bid of SI.775.100 for all the construction was given by N.J. Riebe Enterprises Inc. The other bids were considerably higher. Charles Me- Connell. YRMC administrator, said today. The construction will be funded by money from the bond issue passed two years ago and hospital foundation dollars. McConnell added that although the construction bid does not include equipment costs, he and the board members expect to be able to afford the equipment as well. Webb said the board will accept the low bid at its board meeting Tuesday. Texas and Maine considered rescin- ding their previous ratification votes. Three other states have already voted to rescind Idaho, Nebraska and Tennessee. The 21-19 Florida vote was a disappointment but not a surprise. Florida has defeated the measure on five previous votes, but proponents had hoped they had more strength this year. The ERA needs ratification in three more states by March 22, 1979, to be adopted. "It's not going said in- dependent Sen. Lori Wilson, prime sponsor of the ERA in the Florida Senate. "Sometime, someplace, someday ERA will be a part of our Constitution." Karen DeCrow, president of the National Organization for Women, in Syracuse, N.Y., urged a tourist boycott of Florida while Bill Harrington, ERA America coordinator in Washington, said supporters will now focus on Louisiana, Iljinois and South Carolina. ERA supporters had counted on Florida's ratification to pave the way for adoption in a belt of nine southern states stretching from Virginia to Arkansas. tax rebates that they have come to anticipate." Blumenthal told the National Press Club on Wednesday that the rebate was needed to further stimulate the economy. "The economy is indeed improving but the rate of improvement is still too slow, and we need to find ways to achieve more rapid growth." the treasury secretary said. Both houses of Congress are off for an Easter recess this week. The full Senate was scheduled to take up Carter's stimulus plan next week. The House approved the plan, including the rebates, in March. The plan's chances for passage in the Senate were uncertain.' All 38 Republicans were against it and Democratic support was not solid. The plan would give rebates to 200 million Americans with a taxpayer getting for himself and each dependent. The payments would decrease as income rose between and with no rebates going to those earning more than The payments wbuld also go to recipients of Socie! Security, veterans' pensions and welfare who pay no taxes. Left-turn lights activated on 3 24th St. corners Left-turn arrows at 24th Street and 4th Avenue were activated yesterday, Yuma police reported. Police Sgt. Guy Kizer said the in- tersection is one of three along 24th Street in which the arrows will protect motorists who turn left. Arrows have controlled left turn traffic at Avenue A for several weeks and are scheduled to be activated today at Arizona Avenue. At 4th Avenue, left-turn traffic is controlled in all directions. Green arrows come on for a short time before signals allowing all traffic to go turn green. The intersection is also equipped with yellow arrows to warn left-turners that oncoming traffic is about to be allowed to go, Kizer said. It is permissible to turn left when the yellow arrow goes out and the green light comes on, but motorists must yield to oncoming traffic, according to Kizer. Only north and south traffic will have a protected left-turn light at Arizona Avenue. Kizer said those arrows also will allow left-turn traffic to go shortly before all traffic can move. At Avenue A, left-turn traffic in the westbound and southbound lanes only is protected by an arrow. Kizer said. GAS STATION GOES APE Visitors do a double-take when they spot this grease monkey dressed in a gorilla costume servicing autos at a gasoline station in the Manteca. Calif., area. Owner of the station said the gimmick attracts many curious customers. He now pumps 6.000 gallons of gas more per month than the previous station owner. (AP Laserphotol good evening Yuma WOMAN WHOSE mobile home is destroyed by fire needs aid from Yumans. page 3 CONSOLIDATION of school districts fell short for many. Page 13 Arizona REP. MORRIS K. UDALL was the only representative from Arizona to vote for the Debt Collection Practices Act, a law that restricts actions of debt collectors. Page 5 SENS. DENNIS UeCONCINI and Henry Jackson vow to continue fighting for more funding of the Central Arizona Project. Page 2 sports AWC SPLIT a doublcheader with Pima here yesterday, winning the first game 6-5 and losing the second 13-1. Page 15 Comics........................22 Crossword ....................21 Editorial .....................4-4 Education.....................22 Movies........................21 Parker ........................10 Sports......................15-17 Women.........................9 Weather.......................20'   

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