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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: April 27, 1976 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 27, 1976, Yuma, Arizona                             City planning to get land for Iowa Beef By ERNIE BUSH Thv Yuma Dully Sun The Yuma City Council authorized the city administrator last night to negotiate purchase of state land cast of Yumo for Iowa Beef Processors. The company is attempting to locate about nine miles east of Yuma along the Southern Pacific railroad. Us plant would employ about workers. City attorney Bill Farrell told the council at the special meeting that the the city may purchase state land without auction as a government en- tity. This is according to a ruling by the state attorney general. Farrell said in his opinion there is adequate authority in sections 03 and 64 of the city charter to allow it to purchase the land. The two suctions give the city authority to engage in industrial pursuits "and to do whatever may be necessary or proper therein." They allow the city to establish, maintain the yiiMA SUN and ARIZONA SENTINEL Telephone 783 3333 SUN 141 st Issue, 73rd Year SENTINEL 37th Issue, 104th Year Yuma, Arizona, Tues., Apr. 27, 1 976 Jewelry heist here worth over Jewelry valued ut was stolen during the weekend from Farley's Hardware, 1651 Avc. The burglary was discovered yesterday morning when the business opened, according to Yuma police. Police said the thief entered through a vent in the roof. Once inside, he removed all the jewelry from a display case and Look a large toy submarine from the toy counter. Apparently the box from the sub- marine was used to carry the jewelry from tho scene because the toy was found on the roof of the business. Velvet mountings for the jewelry also were found on the roof. Police said the thief probably sat on the roof to remove the jewelry from the mountings. An officer explained that the roof of Farley's is about four feet lower than surrounding buildings. The thief would not be seen from the street, the officer said. A foam rubber seat pad which ap- peared to'have blown off the roof was found on the ground near Farley's. The stolen jewelry included a pen- dulum set with two a hummingbird and the other a car- inlay ed in cural and mother of pearl, two squash blossom with mvl inlays, rings and bracelets. Top of the news Soliah acquitted SACRAMENTO. Calif. (API Stephen Soliah, 27, Patricia Hearst's former lover, w as acquitted today on federal bank robbery charges. The eight women and four men deliberated hours. Soliah embraced his two lawyers when the verdict was announced in U.S. District Court. His mother sobbed quietly. Rocky apologizes WASHINGTON (AP) Vice President Nelson A. Rockefeller today apologized publicly in the Senate for remarks implying that Sen. Henry M. Jackson had one or more Communists on his staff. Missile needs eyed WASHINGTON (AP) A final Ford administration decision on producing additional long-range Minuteman III missiles will hinge on the course of U.S. -Soviet nuclear arms limitation talks and R.ussian weapons growth between now and September. However, the Pentagon plans to speed procurement of more powerful new multiple warheads for Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICFiM) regardless of whether the negotiating deadlock is broken. New Cardinals named VATICAN CITY (API Pope Paul VI named 19 new cardinals today, including Archbishop William W.akefield Baum of Washington, D.C. The move further rejuvenats and in- ternationalizes the Church body that elects popes the Sacred College of Cardinals. The names of two additional new cardinals were kept secret. Padre tickets being refunded here The Cnbidleros de Yuma, sponsors of the Snn Diego Padres spring training games, ore ready lo close the books on the 1976 season. Although the first six games were wiped out due to the late opening of spring training camps, the Caballeros sec n definite profit to this point. Piiid attendance amounted to over for the six games played. Because of the cancellation of the first six games, the Caballeros offered box sent ticket holders a chnnce lo use up the tickets in the final games. Many of those were used but now the Cnballeros are offering those holding box seats for the games of March 11, 12, 13. M. Ifjand lOa chance to gel refunds. The unused tickets should be turned in at the Yuma County Chamber of Commerce office, 200 VV. 1st St. Requests for refunds will be honored through Friday, according to Keith Robertson, baseball chairman for the Caballeros. and operate a municipal slaughterhouse either in or outside the city limits. Section 64 also gives authority to acquire the necessary land by con- demnation or otherwise. The enabling resolution contains the emergency clause. The reason given for the emergency is that the city's ap- plication for purchase must be sub- mitted before May 15 "in order to obtain the necessary approval of the state land department for the acquisition of the lands described and that the successful conclusion of said negotalions will render extreme benefit to the citizens of the city of Yuma." The State Land Commission will meet May 18 and 19. Farrell said he expects the city's application to be considered then. Andrew Bettwy, state land com- missioner, met with Farrell after the special meeting last night. He ex- plained what information the city needed to bring before the commission. Farrell said this morning he was told that while the commissioner personally supported the city's request, the decision was up to the land com- mission. While Bettwy did not arrive in time for the meeting. Phoenix attorney Robert Lynch was present for Iowa Beef. First National Bank vice president for industrial affairs, G. Reed Macomber, and Jim Gullies, an assistant vice president, were present to answer questions about the financial standing of Iowa Beef. Lynch said the company was very gratified at the continuing interest in making it possible to locate the plant in Yuma. Macomber said he was im- pressed by the tremendous enthusiasm shown for the project. After the meeting, Lynch told reporters the city's attempt to purchase the land was "an advantageous avenue of approach." He said he was hopeful that the city's approach would work out. He said, aiso, that if some arrangement could not he worked out, the firm might eventually have to go to California to build the plant. Lynch said the company's plans call for having the plant under construction by this fall because it badly needed the expansion of its production facdities. Answering a question by Coun- cilman Bob Tippett, Farrell said that the resolution passed last night authorizes the city to investigate the purchase and was not binding on cither party. Farrell said that regardless of whether the city leased or sold the land to Iowa Beef, it would be at the same terms the city is offered by the state. Councilman John Underbill said it was stipulated from the beginning that nil of the cash involved in the tran- saction would come from Iowa Beef and not the county or city. Underbill worked this weekend with other officials on the dilemma caused last week by an attorney general's opinion. The opinion slated that the Yuma County Industrial Development Authority did not have legal authority to purchase state land without auction. County can't block homes near Luke AFB PHOENIX (AP) Maricopa Counly attorneys are seeking a rehearing on a state appeals court decision that the county is powerless to block con- struction of 300 homes near Luke Air Force Rase. The appeals court Monday upheld nn earlier superior court ruling that Nalbnndian Farms, Inc., could develop 320 acres near the north end of the base. Olgerd W. Kalyna, attorney for the county, said he will ask for a rehearing and argue that the board of supervisors has implied power to deny such building applications in the interest of public health and safety. County officials worked with legislators last year on a bill to give the counties stronger controls over bind use near airfields. The measure has been hung up in the legislature over compensation to property owners. Rep. John Rhodes, R-Ariz., who also worked with the county to prolect Luke and Williams Air Force Base from urban encroachment, was disap- pointed. The ruling also could influence a decision by the supervisors two months ago that developers could not build a subdivision at the end of the runways at Williams. IN THE LIMELIGHT President Ford addresses the annual convention of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in Washington Monday where he vowed to check the increase in government spending "if it takes all summer and more and more vetoes." The beams of light are from' a special filter placed over the camera lens. (AP Wirephoto) minimum prison term asked for traffickers in drugs WASHINGTON President Ford urged Congress today to provide stronger penalties, including man- datory minimum prison sentences for drug traffickers, to fight the "national tragedy" of drugabuse. In a special message to legislators, the President warned of a "worsening drug situation" and said it is necessary to take stronger action against the drug traffickers. In addition to more severe prison sentences. Ford called for denying bail to previous offenders, cracking down on tax enforcement against big drug traffickers "to take the easy profits out of drug selling" and permitting the Customs Service to search persons suspected of smuggling drug-profit money out of the country. Ford told Congress "the cost of drug abuse to this nation is staggering." He said more than Americans die each year from improper use of drugs and that law enforcement officials estimate "as much as one half of all street crime robberies, muggings, burglaries are committed by drug addicts to support their expensive and debilitating habits." "Drug abuse constitutes a clear and present threat lo the health and future of our Ford said. Calling for stronger action against "these merchants of death" the drug traffickers Ford said he would send Congress legislation this week to require: Mandatory minimum sentences of at least three years for a first offense conviction of trafficking in heroin and narcotic drugs and at least six years for subsequent offenses or for selling to a minor. Arizona House ready to vote on Funk Greyhound racing circuit breakup BULLETIN PHOENIX Arizona House today passed and sent to the Senate by a 47-10 vote a bill that would mandate an end to the Funk Racing Circuit monopoly of dog racing by Dec. PHOENIX (API A House vote was scheduled today on legislation aimed at ending the Funk Greyhound Racing Circuit's control over all six dogracing tracks in Arizona. The proposal would require divistiturc of all bul three of te tracks by Dec. 31, 1981, and prohibit a single owner from monopolizing the two larger tracks in Phoenix and Tucson. The proposal, which caps a five-year effort by lawmakers to open dog-racing to competition, cleared debate lust week with only technical changes. One provision would prevent a con- cessionaire or other party, from gaining a stake in the tracks" through loans, a limitation directed ut the Funk financial help. Meantime, House Majority Leader Burton Barr. said he ex- pects to bring the proposed repealer of the auto emissions control law to the floor for debate Friday. He expected amdnemenls to the existing law to be ready today for a preview by mujoritv Republicans. "We'll take it before the Hepublioan caucus Wednesday for a formal look and hope that we can change some Barr. Barr hopes to save the existing law. mandating auto emission controls in Maricopa and Pima counties, by easing off on supervisions. He did nol disclose the proposed previsions, but they are known to set some ceiling on the costs of repairing older cars to meet emission standards. The House Health and Welfare Committee revived a stringent welfare fraud measure defeated on the House floor by attaching it to a Senate bill relating to child abuse. The committee, headed by Rep. Diane McCarthy. K-Glendalc, voted along mostly party lines Monday to hitch the welfare fraud bill to Ihe child abuse measure. Minority Democrats protested it as an attempt to bring back a measure already defeated by the House. The welfare fraud bill fell one vote short of the 31 needed last week when the Republicans were absent from the floor. It failed to get a single vote from Democrats, who contended that the provision requiring welfare recipients to carry identity cards with their thumbprints went too far. They also objected to setting up 'an investigative bureau within the Department of Economic Security to seek out welfare cheaters. The Senate bill lo which it was at- tached would require social service workers lo report any evidence of child abuse. Doctors, social workers and others with knowledge of. abuse of youngsters would be liable to a SI.000 fine and up to one year in jail if they failed to report such evidence to law enforcement agencies. Consultants are considered for city water expansion Three consultants presented proposals for studies of the need for expansion of Yuma's water facilities at a Yuma City Council study session last night. The session was conducted jointly by the council and the Sewer and Water Commission. A letter was sent out to a number of consulting firms by the city ad- ministrator's office at the beginning of April inviting proposals lo be sub- mitted. The letter stated the study will lead to a bond election to expand wnter treatment and distribution facilities. The city received six replies. Of those, it chose to hear more details from three of the firms. Presented at last night's session were proposals from R.B. Williams and Associates of Yuma; a joint venture by PACE Associates of Yuma and Johannessen and Girand of Phoenix; and John Carollo of Phoenix. The companies were told in the city's letter that the proposed study would include, but not be limited to, 10 areas: "Would the present location of the water plant be the best place for ex- pansion? well water available in sufficient quantities to provide a stable and safe source? prepared by Black and Vcatch, which are 90-95% complete, will be used. What degree of modifications would be required? is the recommended of this expansion phase? BULLETIN CHARLOTTE AMALIE, Virgin Islands (AP) An American Airlines passenger jot crashed Tuesday in the U.S. Virgin Islands, tho Federal Aviation Administration said. The crash was reported at Harry S. Truman airport in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas. Inside the Sun are still not equal. I'age 2. continues on growing consumer power. Page 5. TREES Immaculate Conception third graders raised money and planted tree. graders Page 9. TIIOSF. stars again as Padres beat Cubs 6-2. Page 11. Comics .....13 Parker.......6 Crossword 7 Somerton ___3 Editorial Markets......2 Weather......7 Movies......13 Women ......9 Grain quality bill is facing veto by Ford WASHINGTON (AP) Legislation that would create a special agency to assure that foreign buyers get the quality and amount of grain they pav for may face a presidential veto. The measure, passed 52 to 18 by the Senate on Monday, is aimed at placing more government controls on the business of weighing nnd shipping grain following scandals involving bribery, misgrading, shorlweighling and other abuses. additions to the distribution system are recommended? role would an interconnect between MCAS's and Ihc city's water supplies play? is the feasibility of a dual distribution system for irrigation? would be the estimated revenue adjustments if any, and what would the effect be on water rates? is Ihe estimated cost of the recommended improvements? much time would.be required to complete the study? R.B. Williams estimalecl the study would take four months and cost S12.500; PACE, 90 days and Carollo, four to six months, City administrator Jim Clevenger said he expects to have a recom- mendation Friday from the Water and Sewer Commission on which firm to retain. He said Ihe recommendation would probably he given to the city council at its Monday night work session. The weather LowthtMimrnint; Low tonight mKliWi-iIni'silnv Relative htimidity nl II ii.in. AvcrnKc low thi-; date rrtrrrnsi fur nml vicinity. ihr SiinsH? 17 SunriM mil Mils nid Ms [HTM-; 89 oil   

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